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One Day-One Park ticket $71!!!

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JimboJones123

Well-Known Member
one of you just paid $2500 for WDW tickets and lodging..

But this doesn't cover your food, travel expenses, any sort of buying to, from and in the parks, or any sort of OUTSIDE expenses.. like a different theme park or what not,, Nasa or a day and night on the beach....


$2500 just as a BASE.. your final figures have to be close to $3000 minimum if not much higher..


$3000 for your stay at Disney.. this isn't the WALDORF ASTORIA.. this is ORLANDO... where its getting to be tough just going downtown..


Others mentioned $1500.. think about that.. thats lodging and Tickets only for a family of 4.. how much do you spend on food per day? toys and trinkets PER DAY?


again your final figure is far from $1500.. completely different..

and if you are covering all the costs, ,meaning that no one else is kicking in, how does that affect your family budget the rest of the year..


if you are making $40,000 per year, can you afford 8 or 9% of your income on just DISNEY?

and $40000 above the average family income in this country.. most have about $35-37000 per year...

these are real numbers folks..

and Disney is not looking at people who make this type of money any more.. its for all those who make more then $40000 per year.. in fact WDW is really looking at those who make $50,000 per year.. and some of those people spent 10% of their wages at WDW per year. .

and its very easy to give WDW $5000. very easy and you won't be staying at the prime stuff either..

WDW is like going to Las Vegas.. except you have NO chance of getting your money back..

Very true, that $5000 on a premium pkg at a GF suite is easily $10-12K.

People are spending money. Anybody notice that base rates at Value and Moderate have remained almost unchanged for over a decade? That's a decade. Not to many things don't change prices for a decade. WDW 1 day tix have doubled. So, maybe a WDW trip isn't that bad after all.
 

sbkline

Well-Known Member
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I don't doubt that WDW is trying to encourage people to stay at the resort as opposed to one day visits and that this is part of their strategy. However, before we buy totally into this idea that it's a big conspiracy to rip people off and exclude certain groups of people, we also have to keep in mind that they are a business and, like all businesses, they have to raise prices to keep up. Walmart does it. KMart does it. Every business does it. As expenses increase, or if minimum wage increases, businesses have to raise their prices a little to make up the extra cost. Heck, even if minimum wage doesn't increase, I'm sure Disney still gives pay raises, which means, in all likeliehood, that they will slightly increase their fees in order to make up for those wages. And again, since everyone presumably gets some kind of raise throughout the year, $4 per day on a ticket really isn't that much at all by itself, let alone when compared to the extra income that one gets from an annual raise.

I have two jobs. My part time job now gives a flat 40 cent raise per year. My full time job gives a percentage raise. Supposed to be 3 percent, but due to budget problems, sometimes only 2 percent. Assumming they don't jack up our insurance payroll deduction this year, a 2 percent raise would get me about 18 dollars more per pay period (before taxes). Multiply that by 24 paychecks in a year, and I really don't think an extra 4 dollars for a one day ticket is going to send me to the poor house.
 
On the disney web site right now they are offereing Value resorts at something like $64 a night (I think that is the actual amount but I might be a little off). I got married 2 months ago (in Altoona, PA--not anywhere close to being a big city)and booked hotel rooms at 3 different hotels for my guests. None of the rooms were that cheap...even with the room discounts. I think the cheapest of the 3 hotels was $89 a night.

I think the best point so far has been.....if this increase is really going to throw your yearly budget way off then Disney is probably not an every year vacation for you. The only reason that I have gone so many times in the past couple of years is because 2 of the trips were for conventions. We went last summer and our next trip will probably be next year. After that...who knows. Part of the fun of Disney for us is seeing the new attractions and being away long enough to make it really special when you go back.
 

JimboJones123

Well-Known Member
On the disney web site right now they are offereing Value resorts at something like $64 a night (I think that is the actual amount but I might be a little off). I got married 2 months ago (in Altoona, PA--not anywhere close to being a big city)and booked hotel rooms at 3 different hotels for my guests. None of the rooms were that cheap...even with the room discounts. I think the cheapest of the 3 hotels was $89 a night.

I think the best point so far has been.....if this increase is really going to throw your yearly budget way off then Disney is probably not an every year vacation for you. The only reason that I have gone so many times in the past couple of years is because 2 of the trips were for conventions. We went last summer and our next trip will probably be next year. After that...who knows. Part of the fun of Disney for us is seeing the new attractions and being away long enough to make it really special when you go back.

And you can't beat $64 a night off site very easily, esp w/ free parking and the quickest shuttle system.
 

Scooter

Well-Known Member
I realize that prices have to go up...I have no problem with that.
It's NOT about a 4 dollar price increase for a park ticket.
It's about Disney raising prices TWICE a year...which I believe comes to about a 10 or 12 percent increase.
I don't get two raises a year. I don't know anyone that does. If I DO get a raise it's usually 3% or 4% at best.
When I budget for a vacation I expect things to go up every year...but it's the fact that these prices are going up so often and so much that is causing me grief.

I keep hearing things like "Whats 4 bucks gonna hurt?" but if you have a family of 6 it all adds up. Plus parking keeps going up, room rates keep increasing, food prices increase. again...for a family of 6 on a budget, it's hard to save up for vacation like this.

Some of you have said things like "If you can't afford it...don't go...that leaves more room for me and my family" well I can't even begin to say what I want to say to you people...But the fact is, Walt wanted to build his parks so that ALL familys could go and enjoy them, not just a certain percentage of upper class folks.

All I'm saying is this...I work hard for the money I make, and have always been fortunate enough to be able to afford my nice week long Disney vacations...but if Disney keeps raising their prices at the speed and amount they have been recently, I think myself, and a LOT of other familys will be forced to rethink their vacation plans.
It's all about making money..I know that...but let's not get greedy..ok?
 

LudwigVonDrake

Well-Known Member
If you buy a MYW ticket for 7 days with the park hopper option, how much does it come out to a day? Probably $40-$50 a day (I'm guessing). That's a great deal. I'm sure they raised the prices to 1) put more money in their pocket and 2) to get people to stay longer and "save" money. You don't really save money, you spend it elsewhere in the resort. :)

I'm curious, anyone know what the cost of a ticket Disneyland cost back in 1955?
 

ClemsonTigger

Naturally Grumpy
Disneyland 1972 (prices about the same for Disneyworld)...let me try to go back further....

http://www.justdisney.com/Features/tickets.html

Heres a link for WDW: http://www.allearsnet.com/tix/tixpix70.htm

A Coupon- 10¢
Main Street Horse Cars (Main Street)
Horseless Carriage (Main Street)
Omnibus (Main Street)
Sleeping Beauty Castle (Fantasyland)
Fire Engine (Main Street)
King Arthur Carousel (Fantasyland)

B Coupon- 25¢
Main Street Cinema (Main Street)
Swiss Family Treehouse (Adventureland)
Motor Boat Cruise (Fantasyland)
Casey Junior Circus Train (Fantasyland)
Alice in Wonderland (Fantasyland)

C Coupon- 40¢
Peter Pan Flight (Fantasyland)
Dumbo Flying Elephants (Fantasyland)
Mr. Toad's Wild Ride (Fantasyland)
Snow White's Adventures (Fantasyland)
Fantasyland Theater (Fantasyland)
Mad Tea Party (Fantasyland)
Mike Fink Keel Boats (Frontierland)
Great Moments with Mr. Lincoln (Main Street)
Autopias (Fantasyland, Tomorrowland)
Shooting Galleries (Frontierland, Adventureland)

D Coupon- 40¢
Rocket Jets (Tomorrowland)
PeopleMover (Tomorrowland)
Flight to the Moon (Tomorrowland)
Storybookland Canal Boats (Fantasyland)
Skyway (Tomorrowland, and Fantasyland)
Tom Sawyer Island Rafts (Frontierland)
Davy Crockett's Explorer Canoes (Bear Country)
Santa Fe & Disneyland Railroad (Main Street, New Orleans Square and Tomorrowland)
Columbia Sailing Ship (Frontierland)
Mark Twain Steamboat (Frontierland)

E Coupon- 85¢ Adults, 75¢ Children
Mine Train Ride (Frontierland)
Pack Mules (Frontierland)
Jungle River Cruise (Adventureland)
It's a Small World (Fantasyland)
Disneyland-Alweg Monorail Trains (Tomorrowland)
Matterhorn Bobsleds (Fantasyland)
Enchanted Tiki Room(Adventureland)
Submarine Voyage (Tomorrowland)
Pirates of the Caribbean (New Orleans Square)
Country Bear Jamboree (Bear Country)
Haunted Mansion (New Orleans Square)





Coupon Books
For families, and large groups, buying coupons individually would cost too much. So, Coupon Books were also sold.
Coupon Books, from August 1972
10-Ride Ticket Book
Coupon Book: A-10¢ (1), B-25¢ (1), C-40¢ (2), D-70¢ (3), E-85¢ (3), General Admission Ticket (1)
Adult: $4.95 ($10.00 value)
Junior (12 thru 17): $4.45 ($9.00 value)
Child (3 thru 11): $3.95 ($7.25 value)

15-Ride Ticket Book
Coupon Book: A-10¢ (1), B-25¢ (2), C-40¢ (3), D-70¢ (4), E-85¢ (5), General Admission Ticket (1)
Adult: $5.95 ($12.35 value)
Junior (12 thru 17): $5.45 ($12.00 value)
Child (3 thru 11): $4.95 ($9.50 value)
 

ClemsonTigger

Naturally Grumpy
OK, here's original Disneyland:

http://www.yesterland.com/tickets.html

The Big 10 Ticket Book
Coupon Makeup: A-10¢ (1), B-25¢ (1), C-35¢ (2), D-45¢ (3), E-60¢ (3), General Admission Ticket (1)

Adult: $4.00 ($6.20 value)
Junior (12 thru 17): $3.50 ($5.40 value)
Child (3 thru 11): $3.00 ($4.50 value)

The Deluxe 15 Ticket Book
Coupon Makeup: A-10¢ (1), B-25¢ (2), C-35¢ (3), D-45¢ (4), E-60¢ (5), General Admission Ticket (1)

Adult: $5.00 ($8.45 value)
Junior (12 thru 17): $4.50 ($7.65 value)
Child (3 thru 11): $4.00 ($6.55 value)
 

sbkline

Well-Known Member
It's about Disney raising prices TWICE a year...which I believe comes to about a 10 or 12 percent increase.
I don't get two raises a year. I don't know anyone that does. If I DO get a raise it's usually 3% or 4% at best.


I'm not thrilled about them raising rates either, don't get me wrong. But just to keep things in perspective here, 10 or 12 percent of 67 dollars is still a heck of a lot smaller than 3 or 4 percent of your salary. I have no clue what you make, but I'll just say, for example, 25 grand a year. 3 percent of that is $750. 4 extra dollars per person compared to $750 is still not a big deal. And I doubt you are taking that whole family down there for just one day. The price per day gets smaller the more days you get on your pass. So if you take your family down there for 4 days, you're not paying $71 a day. I'll have to double check and see what the rate is for that on the new price breakdown, but just looking at last year's prices, it looks like the per day rate for a 5 day pass is a little more than $20 cheaper than the price of a one day ticket.
 

sbkline

Well-Known Member
I just checked. The new price for a 5 day parkhopper pass would be $251: 206 for the pass and 45 for the parkhopper option. Last year's price would have been $193 plus $35 for parkhopper. So an increase of $26 per person on a 5 day parkhopper pass. But the per day price comes out to just a little more than $50. Still not too bad.
 

maleficent_man

New Member
I continue to be confused by this discussion. A trip to Disney (for non-locals) is a luxury. It is not meant, nor ever has been something for everyone to do. Just look at the constant sales and expansion of DVC...obviously there is money available for a large number of people.

When I hear of complaints with restaurant prices....it is the same as when we go out here...granted, we don't go out 7 days a week. Even a couple of pizza's on Friday night is $20-30. Airfares used to be $59 or so one way...are we close to that anywhere? Others have given the price of tickets to baseball, football, broadway and the like. A trip for five to the movies is $40-50 plus snacks if you get them. A basic beach house here starts at about $3,000 per week...no food, no laundry, no AC, no beach badges.

If you are careful, you can do Disney on a budget, and tickets along with a stay at All Star and limited dining can be done relatively cheaply. Speaking of hotels....where can you stay any cheaper than All Star with the discount...it is about the same as Quality, Hampton Inn and the like. With the dining option of $35/day, you can eat better than you can anywhere else for that.

To be perfectly honest, I don't know of any other recreation that I feel I get as much for the money as I do at Disney.
Ladies and gents...we have a winner - this is the best post so far! I'll say it again - in terms of value for money, nothing comes close to a day spent in the Disney theme parks. How many people on here actually pay for a day ticket? In terms of what you get and the admission goes to ensuring Disney stays magical (parades, shows, cm's, new attractions) then it is excellent value for money.
 

Brian Noble

Active Member
these price hikes utterly exclude the casual visitor
And that's exactly the point! The new ticket plan is designed entirely around one premise: encouraging longer trips, and discouraging shorter ones. We can argue about whether or not that's a wise business decision, but it is a very conscious, and deliberate decision. Just as was the extension of EMH into the evening, the addition of ME, the very attractive pricing of DDP, and a host of other little marketing messages and loss leaders that encourage guests to stay longer, and in a Disney-owned hotel. The goal is to put heads in beds. I would bet a mickeybar that the resorts have a much higher operating margin than do the parks.

because if you actually pay the bills, you would be singing a different tune..
I pay the bills, thanks, and this increase is not that big of a deal. We are a family of 2A+2C. We have to fly to get there: about $1K. Tickets are about another $1K. We are offsite heathens, and typically rent a pool home for about $120/night or so---another thousand. We spend a bit less than the DDP costs for food: about $80 per day. Plus assorted trinkets, etc. etc. etc., and our trip comes in right around $4K. Our tickets (2A+2C 7+Hop) have gone up about $100 over the past year.

Walt wanted to build his parks so that ALL familys could go and enjoy them
That's the story, but it isn't the whole truth. Walt was nothing if not a businessman and a showman besides. The "gosh darn it, there must be *something* I can do with my girls" shtick is cute, but the parks have always been priced to be viewed as "something special."

When MK opened, it cost about $10 to get in and get a 7-coupon book. That's about $48 in 2005 dollars. So, yes, the tickets have grown faster than inflation, but only slightly. But, incomes have risen similarly. Median income for a 4-person family in 1974 was a shade under $15000. That's a bit more than $58K in 2003 dollars, but the 2003 median income was $65K.

(I'm taking inflation computations from westegg.com, and median income data from census.gov.)

So, if median income is growing faster than inflation, that menas that median discretionary income is also growing. Since WDW is a discretionary expense (as is all of the other comparison prices of concerts, etc. etc.) it makes sense that it, too, grows faster than inflation. After all, you only have so much time to spend your discretionary income, so economic demand naturally increases, increasing prices.

Perhaps the most surprising thing (to me) is that the income/inflation trend doesn't support the hypothesis that WDW is excluding market segments---income is growing faster than inflation, so it's no surprise that the price of discretionary activities is, too.
 

Nemo14

Well-Known Member
And that's exactly the point! The new ticket plan is designed entirely around one premise: encouraging longer trips, and discouraging shorter ones. We can argue about whether or not that's a wise business decision, but it is a very conscious, and deliberate decision. Just as was the extension of EMH into the evening, the addition of ME, the very attractive pricing of DDP, and a host of other little marketing messages and loss leaders that encourage guests to stay longer, and in a Disney-owned hotel. The goal is to put heads in beds. I would bet a mickeybar that the resorts have a much higher operating margin than do the parks.


I pay the bills, thanks, and this increase is not that big of a deal. We are a family of 2A+2C. We have to fly to get there: about $1K. Tickets are about another $1K. We are offsite heathens, and typically rent a pool home for about $120/night or so---another thousand. We spend a bit less than the DDP costs for food: about $80 per day. Plus assorted trinkets, etc. etc. etc., and our trip comes in right around $4K. Our tickets (2A+2C 7+Hop) have gone up about $100 over the past year.

That's the story, but it isn't the whole truth. Walt was nothing if not a businessman and a showman besides. The "gosh darn it, there must be *something* I can do with my girls" shtick is cute, but the parks have always been priced to be viewed as "something special."

When MK opened, it cost about $10 to get in and get a 7-coupon book. That's about $48 in 2005 dollars. So, yes, the tickets have grown faster than inflation, but only slightly. But, incomes have risen similarly. Median income for a 4-person family in 1974 was a shade under $15000. That's a bit more than $58K in 2003 dollars, but the 2003 median income was $65K.

(I'm taking inflation computations from westegg.com, and median income data from census.gov.)

So, if median income is growing faster than inflation, that menas that median discretionary income is also growing. Since WDW is a discretionary expense (as is all of the other comparison prices of concerts, etc. etc.) it makes sense that it, too, grows faster than inflation. After all, you only have so much time to spend your discretionary income, so economic demand naturally increases, increasing prices.

Perhaps the most surprising thing (to me) is that the income/inflation trend doesn't support the hypothesis that WDW is excluding market segments---income is growing faster than inflation, so it's no surprise that the price of discretionary activities is, too.
Just for the record, we (DH and I) have not had a pay raise in 3 years, and in fact took a cut in pay this year, and I'm sure we're not the only ones.
 

niteobsrvr

Active Member
I don't doubt that WDW is trying to encourage people to stay at the resort as opposed to one day visits and that this is part of their strategy. However, before we buy totally into this idea that it's a big conspiracy to rip people off and exclude certain groups of people, we also have to keep in mind that they are a business and, like all businesses, they have to raise prices to keep up. Walmart does it. KMart does it. Every business does it. As expenses increase, or if minimum wage increases, businesses have to raise their prices a little to make up the extra cost. Heck, even if minimum wage doesn't increase, I'm sure Disney still gives pay raises, which means, in all likeliehood, that they will slightly increase their fees in order to make up for those wages. And again, since everyone presumably gets some kind of raise throughout the year, $4 per day on a ticket really isn't that much at all by itself, let alone when compared to the extra income that one gets from an annual raise.

I have two jobs. My part time job now gives a flat 40 cent raise per year. My full time job gives a percentage raise. Supposed to be 3 percent, but due to budget problems, sometimes only 2 percent. Assumming they don't jack up our insurance payroll deduction this year, a 2 percent raise would get me about 18 dollars more per pay period (before taxes). Multiply that by 24 paychecks in a year, and I really don't think an extra 4 dollars for a one day ticket is going to send me to the poor house.
Has everyone stopped to think yet, why we only get 4% raises at best and have to change companies to get hihger pay?

One big reason is this. Imagine standing in the middle of Walmart looking at toilet paper. Now imagine the smiley face on the sign right above it, :), that states prices are falling.

You cant get a decent raise if the manufacturers are constantly having to cut prices and productions cost to meet our expectations that prices remain unchanged or go lower. Supply and demand in basic economics jsut doesnt work that way.

What kind of situation ahve we really created here?
 

LilRoo714

New Member
When MK opened, it cost about $10 to get in and get a 7-coupon book. That's about $48 in 2005 dollars. So, yes, the tickets have grown faster than inflation, but only slightly. But, incomes have risen similarly. Median income for a 4-person family in 1974 was a shade under $15000. That's a bit more than $58K in 2003 dollars, but the 2003 median income was $65K.

(I'm taking inflation computations from westegg.com, and median income data from census.gov.)

So, if median income is growing faster than inflation, that menas that median discretionary income is also growing. Since WDW is a discretionary expense (as is all of the other comparison prices of concerts, etc. etc.) it makes sense that it, too, grows faster than inflation. After all, you only have so much time to spend your discretionary income, so economic demand naturally increases, increasing prices.

Perhaps the most surprising thing (to me) is that the income/inflation trend doesn't support the hypothesis that WDW is excluding market segments---income is growing faster than inflation, so it's no surprise that the price of discretionary activities is, too.
I applaud the very well-researched and well-written argument. :sohappy: Thanks for putting the situation into those terms.
 

sbkline

Well-Known Member
You cant get a decent raise if the manufacturers are constantly having to cut prices and productions cost to meet our expectations that prices remain unchanged or go lower. Supply and demand in basic economics jsut doesnt work that way.

What kind of situation ahve we really created here?


On the other hand, one could wonder why we need pay raises if prices across the board stay the same or drop. Making the same amount of money while paying lower prices is, in effect, a "raise". On the other hand, if we get raises, but then everyone raises their prices to adjust, then what really is the point of the raise? We're spending more than we were before the raise, so how are we coming out ahead?
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niteobsrvr

Active Member
Some of you have said things like "If you can't afford it...don't go...that leaves more room for me and my family" well I can't even begin to say what I want to say to you people...But the fact is, Walt wanted to build his parks so that ALL familys could go and enjoy them, not just a certain percentage of upper class folks.
Walt never said that. He wanted to build a place where adults could enjoy the attractions with their children together. He built just such a place in Anaheim. The Florida Project was set to be more of a destination even in Walt's original concepts with the industrial area and Epcot and so forth.

And that is what it has become, a destination. If you are really well off, you can visit as often as you would like. If you aren't, saving and careful planning are required. It is no different than any other vacation. I can't afford to go to the west coast every year either. I do that about every 10 years or so unless work plays a part in going there.

Walt understood money all too well from his buisiness ventures. He once even said (and I paraphrase) that the one thing he knew about money was that he never had enough of it to do everything that he wanted to do. I think that in itself is a great lesson from a very famous man. If it is worth doing, it is worth working for seems to be the mantra. I don't think I ever read a quote form him where he blamed others for setbacks in his life. Even in the Oswald situation, while devasted, he moved forward and learned his leeson well.

Walt also had a much different reality than we have now. Air travel wasn't convenient or cheap. THat is another reason why DIsney World was placed where it is. Getting here by car was relatively easy compared to flying. I doubt that he even imagined that people would return annually or more frequently to visit. In that time, coming to Florida every couple of years to visit would have been considered reasonable.
 

bjlc57

Well-Known Member
but you are not....

see you are basing your costs on YOUR PERSONAL INCOME.. and If I was the real Brian Noble, I would have millions of dollars to spend..

but your $4000 is more then 10 percent of the AVERAGE AMERICAN'S FAMILY INCOME.. which I believe according to this months CNNFN is between $35- 37000 per year...

so how do you justify the AVERAGE MAN spending over 10 percent of his income? over 10 percent. that's more then you should give your church..


see its one thing if your income is $100,000 per year.. but the average American isn't making this..


the one gentleman is talking about WORKING TWO JOBS.. meaning over 40 hours per week, and then he is justifying $4000 for a week at WDW.. meaning that he has to take time away from his family to pay for this trip and other family expenses.. when you consistantly work over 40 hours per week, you deteriorate your family time and possibly affect your long term family needs..

is Disney worth giving up on your family on a daily basis to justify a trip? and can you sustain a good relationship while being away from your family year after year after year..


Put the dollars into the percentage of income.. NOt your personal income,because everyone is different.. If I were a retired football player getting my retireiment plus money from outside incomes as a tv person, heck I could easily justify spending $5000, but that is for ME PERSONALLY and not what WDW is all about..


WALT WANTED A PLACE WHERE EVERYONE COULD AFFORD TO COME..

One of his quotes was, There will always be 10 CENT COFFEE at Disneyland..

think of this priceing compared to the average American income and then tell me that we all can justify giving 10 percent of our income to Disney..
 

bjlc57

Well-Known Member
50,000 per year IF......

Yes some people average $50,000 IF YOU LIVE IN THE TOP 100 cities of America.. except that there are so many more cities in AMERICA then the top 100.. many, many areas are just like I stated.. $35- 37000 disposable income..

and YES WALT WANTED DISNEY TO BE A PLACE FOR EVERYONE.. Not just the rich..

when I hear justification about "walt not having enough money.. and the like"
This sounds like a stock holder talking. . Who cares what the price is , all I CARE ABOUT IS THE STOCK GOING UP.. meaning all I care about is ME...
 
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