News WDW Food and Beverage Price Increases 10/1/2019

Lilofan

Well-Known Member
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For those prices, does the glassware come alive and do a fancy dance and song for you as they make their way to your seat?
Like talking Remy in the restaurant in France in Epcot?
 

beertiki

Well-Known Member
I paid $5 for a 20 ounce Powerade at DS last week. Price was not displayed at the kiosk. Figured it was going to be about $4, and knew I was getting ripped off, but I was real thirsty. $5 is awful.

Prices have reached the point that it is cheaper to take an Uber off site to a restaurant, and have better food and still save money.

Beer prices have gone way up. A Bud Light draft was $8 at the pool bar.
 

Sandman85

New Member
We were Florida resident passholders for many years in a row. We let them lapse almost two years ago after rising costs and overcrowded parks just took the fun out of it for us. We needed a break. But it wasn't so long ago, we'd pop over to the parks and if we grabbed quick service lunch while there (couple burgers and fries) it was like $20 for both of us. Then it was like $25. Now it's like $35. For the same thing. I mean, we're talking two pretty low-standard burgers and fries and a couple cokes! It's one of those things where it goes from a easy, low stress day to actually needing to plan out your day and the costs of everything. If I suddenly need a $100 just to get a lunch, a few drinks and maybe a snack or two for the day, that's a much bigger investment and not something I am going to want to do as often. I know $1 here and $2 there doesn't seem like much but it's a very cumulative thing. I just looked and found a 1/4 lb burger and fries combo at Cosmic Rays was $6.69 in 2011. A 1/3 lb burger and fries is now $12.29. That's a pretty steep increase. And I'm just going for a day! People who are there for a week - well, it adds up even faster.
Well stated.. My wife and I have enjoyed so many times at Disney Orlando since 1984. We have stayed in most of the hotels and spent our fair share in all the parks. Sadly, we no longer feel the magic and excitement we once did. Maybe that feeling will return one day, but the pricing increases (tickets, parking, food, beverages, etc..) may keep us away forever.
 

Lilofan

Well-Known Member
We try to eat a big meal off property prior to entering Epcot. But you know what they say about EPCOT. - Every Person Comes Out Tired , ( and broke).
 

Ricky Spanish

Well-Known Member
I paid $5 for a 20 ounce Powerade at DS last week. Price was not displayed at the kiosk. Figured it was going to be about $4, and knew I was getting ripped off, but I was real thirsty. $5 is awful.

Prices have reached the point that it is cheaper to take an Uber off site to a restaurant, and have better food and still save money.

Beer prices have gone way up. A Bud Light draft was $8 at the pool bar.
And that's why I bring my own Powerade.
32oz. bottles that cost me 49 cents (on sale) each.
 

unmitigated disaster

Well-Known Member
For some perspective, a bottle of Sprite cost me €4.50 across the street from the Vatican. Captive audience.

There's actually another reason why Disney - and other places- don't want you to bring in your own food to restaurants: food borne illnesses. In some places local health laws forbid it. It wasn't allowed where I lived when I worked fast food and we did have to go tell people yeah, can't eat that outside food in here.
 

ImperfectPixie

Well-Known Member
For some perspective, a bottle of Sprite cost me €4.50 across the street from the Vatican. Captive audience.

There's actually another reason why Disney - and other places- don't want you to bring in your own food to restaurants: food borne illnesses. In some places local health laws forbid it. It wasn't allowed where I lived when I worked fast food and we did have to go tell people yeah, can't eat that outside food in here.
They're not even supposed to throw away used cups from other locations, etc. I've forgotten to toss a cup at a drive-thru more than once, and been told they weren't allowed to take it to throw it away.
 

KikoKea

Well-Known Member
We were Florida resident passholders for many years in a row. We let them lapse almost two years ago after rising costs and overcrowded parks just took the fun out of it for us. We needed a break. But it wasn't so long ago, we'd pop over to the parks and if we grabbed quick service lunch while there (couple burgers and fries) it was like $20 for both of us. Then it was like $25. Now it's like $35. For the same thing. I mean, we're talking two pretty low-standard burgers and fries and a couple cokes! It's one of those things where it goes from a easy, low stress day to actually needing to plan out your day and the costs of everything. If I suddenly need a $100 just to get a lunch, a few drinks and maybe a snack or two for the day, that's a much bigger investment and not something I am going to want to do as often. I know $1 here and $2 there doesn't seem like much but it's a very cumulative thing. I just looked and found a 1/4 lb burger and fries combo at Cosmic Rays was $6.69 in 2011. A 1/3 lb burger and fries is now $12.29. That's a pretty steep increase. And I'm just going for a day! People who are there for a week - well, it adds up even faster.
I agree. For the first time, we started going back to Shades of Green for dinner because we were tired of paying too much for so-so food. For the same price, we were able to enjoy the hotel's buffet and soda/juice. We have a few places we'll go for TS, either for the themeing or the food, but it's not every trip, and maybe once or twice, it at all. I understand and expect prices will be higher at WDW, but the value for us has dropped .
 

tirian

Well-Known Member
Perhaps a few are waking up to reality and are getting their financial closets in order? Perhaps paying off debt, meeting monthly expenses on time so they don't lose their house, or condo, or car, to the bank? 😉
Another day, another lunchtime Disney conversation with regular people (aka “not fans”).

This time it was a department head of global sales, who was visiting our office and definitely makes good money. Our group was talking about holiday plans, and someone is going to WDW, and the first words out of the exec’s mouth: “Ugh, we don’t go anymore because it’s too expensive and complicated.”

Then she told me how her family went two years ago and she felt “nickeled and dimed.” Incidentally, she’s taking her family to Germany for their Christmas markets.

This woman must make over $400k/year plus bonuses.

Of course, there are multiple factors here. I don’t know where she stayed at WDW (probably Deluxe), or which resorts she considered, or any other detail about her last trip—except she felt like she was ripped off.

Disney has got to get their pricing strategy in line with people’s expectations. We enthusiasts will keep budgeting for the parks as long as we can, but average guests seem to be hitting their threshold for “value”: for the price of a WDW trip, they can go to Europe, Canada, Colorado, Hawaii, etc. and feel like they got more value for their money.*

Disney has never had that problem in the past. Their reputation used to be “expensive but worth the price.”

*It’s also worth pointing out how over the last few months, several business mags have commented that the Disney parks and hotels have finally been overpriced.
 

tirian

Well-Known Member
For some perspective, a bottle of Sprite cost me €4.50 across the street from the Vatican. Captive audience.

There's actually another reason why Disney - and other places- don't want you to bring in your own food to restaurants: food borne illnesses. In some places local health laws forbid it. It wasn't allowed where I lived when I worked fast food and we did have to go tell people yeah, can't eat that outside food in here.
The only difference is that people don’t live in a tourist piazza, sports arena, or movie theater for 4–7 days at a time.

The “captive audience” argument falls apart when people have to keep paying outrageous prices to feed a family of four over a week’s time. At that point, people move past “it’s a theme park” and into “I’m getting ripped off.”
 

Animaniac93-98

Well-Known Member
The only difference is that people don’t live in a tourist piazza, sports arena, or movie theater for 4–7 days at a time.

The “captive audience” argument falls apart when people have to keep paying outrageous prices to feed a family of four over a week’s time. At that point, people move past “it’s a theme park” and into “I’m getting ripped off.”
Believe it or not, there are people on this board who don't think this is a valid argument.

I can't explain their reasoning, but they will still insist up and down that no, this exact argument is wrong and doesn't make sense. :rolleyes:
 

Sparksfly

Member
See, park tickets I can understand as they upgrade the parks (which I see a lot more downgrading lately mind you), I can understand room rate increases with room updates and even the addition of the transportation like the skyliner, I could probably even understand food increases if it means quality increase as well...but we all know that isn't happening. So I honestly don't get why Disney chooses to increase prices on something like food and drink (which people need literally to not keel over while they're on week long+ vacations more or less on their property) especially when theres no increase in quality or upgrade in menu. They're just being ridiculous now.
 

Lilofan

Well-Known Member
So I honestly don't get why Disney chooses to increase prices on something like food and drink (which people need literally to not keel over while they're on week long+ vacations more or less on their property) especially when theres no increase in quality or upgrade in menu. They're just being ridiculous now.
Because Disney can. Other option is to go off property to eat fast food and come back to the park. Not for me. My time is valuable.
 

wannabeBelle

Well-Known Member
Because Disney can. Other option is to go off property to eat fast food and come back to the park. Not for me. My time is valuable.
Why would you think that only fast food is an option? I get that leaving the parks to go outside to a restaurant ( fast food or otherwise) does take time but it can be worth it. When I was down in May I left the property to go to dine outside and catch a great local band. I had a great time and do plan on doing it again!! Marie
 

xdan0920

Think for yourselfer
Another day, another lunchtime Disney conversation with regular people (aka “not fans”).

This time it was a department head of global sales, who was visiting our office and definitely makes good money. Our group was talking about holiday plans, and someone is going to WDW, and the first words out of the exec’s mouth: “Ugh, we don’t go anymore because it’s too expensive and complicated.”

Then she told me how her family went two years ago and she felt “nickeled and dimed.” Incidentally, she’s taking her family to Germany for their Christmas markets.

This woman must make over $400k/year plus bonuses.

Of course, there are multiple factors here. I don’t know where she stayed at WDW (probably Deluxe), or which resorts she considered, or any other detail about her last trip—except she felt like she was ripped off.

Disney has got to get their pricing strategy in line with people’s expectations. We enthusiasts will keep budgeting for the parks as long as we can, but average guests seem to be hitting their threshold for “value”: for the price of a WDW trip, they can go to Europe, Canada, Colorado, Hawaii, etc. and feel like they got more value for their money.*

Disney has never had that problem in the past. Their reputation used to be “expensive but worth the price.”

*It’s also worth pointing out how over the last few months, several business mags have commented that the Disney parks and hotels have finally been overpriced.
I made a very similar point recently. I played in a charity golf outing in one of the more prestigious NJ country clubs this summer. The topic of DisneyWorld came up since the group I was in all had kids and have been.

Everyone made the same points, keep your hand on your wallet or the mouse will swipe it. These are guys making well into 6 and even 7 figures. Money isn’t an issue. But value is. And to a man, they all felt ripped off. That’s not good.
 

unmitigated disaster

Well-Known Member
Why would you think that only fast food is an option? I get that leaving the parks to go outside to a restaurant ( fast food or otherwise) does take time but it can be worth it. When I was down in May I left the property to go to dine outside and catch a great local band. I had a great time and do plan on doing it again!! Marie
Because a lot of people don't have the means (a vehicle) or the desire to leave. Even Lyft or Uber can be a hassle, especially if you need an EVC, wheelchair or car seats.
 

Lilofan

Well-Known Member
I made a very similar point recently. I played in a charity golf outing in one of the more prestigious NJ country clubs this summer. The topic of DisneyWorld came up since the group I was in all had kids and have been.

Everyone made the same points, keep your hand on your wallet or the mouse will swipe it. These are guys making well into 6 and even 7 figures. Money isn’t an issue. But value is. And to a man, they all felt ripped off. That’s not good.
That's correct. These folks ( not all ) with high net worth and managing their assets are smarter than the average Joe that lives paycheck to paycheck and or always in debt and live like there is no tomorrow.
 
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