Should Disney enforce the Flash Photography policy?

Should Disney eject people who disregard the no flash policy?

  • Yes

    Votes: 137 80.6%
  • No

    Votes: 33 19.4%

  • Total voters
    170
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captainkidd

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
Sorry, but if you're taking a picture in a dark ride and you don't use the flash, you're an idiot. If you do use the flash, you're rude and an idiot.
 

jvenegas

Member
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I think it's both types that take pictures. I never said it was one or the other.

And yes, if I come to Puerto Rico and don't know any Spanish, I deserve whatever kind of problems I get.

I can speak French. Does that make me smarter than you?
No , I guess it doesn't. I already apologized for my remark a couple of posts back, but speaking French makes you look classier :lol: As I said before, if you come visit, pm me first and I'll go pick you up at the airport and make sure you don't get into any trouble:wave:
 

DisneyJoe

Well-Known Member
The rules on the signs clearly state No Flash Photography. No question, no "what-if" scenario's added, no clauses stating special circumstances in which the rule is void. It says No Flash Photography. The announcements prior to shows say: Please Refrain From Flash Photography. "Please Refrain" meaning: Please Do Not Do It
The OP was asking not if the rule was valid, but how it should be enforced if broken.

The poll asked "Should Disney eject people who disregard the no flash policy?"
 

Timekeeper

Well-Known Member
The OP was asking not if the rule was valid, but how it should be enforced if broken.

The poll asked "Should Disney eject people who disregard the no flash policy?"
Exactly. And the word "disregard" implies intentional behavior. It does not take accidents into account. But apparently some members of this forum consider themselves to be perfect. I am not one of them. :cry:
 

Bob Saget

Well-Known Member
Exactly. And the word "disregard" implies intentional behavior. It does not take accidents into account. But apparently some members of this forum consider themselves to be perfect. I am not one of them. :cry:
Nobody's perfect. But one thing that irks me more than others at WDW is the inflating usage of flash cameras inside dark attractions. It seems to get worse every trip to the point that something needs to be done.

But like I told my daughter Stephanie when she accidently drove Uncle Joey's car into the kitchen...everyone makes mistakes.
 

Timekeeper

Well-Known Member
You're right, it is getting worse. Regardless, it will be interesting to see if/when/how Disney addresses it (but I doubt that park ejection will be the next step).
 

Disneydreamer23

Well-Known Member
When I was there In October my husband and I went on HM and literally every 2 seconds the non speaking English people next to me kept flashing let me put it this way bu the end of the ride i was seeing so many white dots when i blinked it was hard to walk lol. I thought it was so rude because I couldn't even enjoy the ride because i kept closing my eyes to avoid my retinas hurting!
 

kbmum

Well-Known Member
This. I will never understand the logic behind flash photography. I'm not photographer, but I can tell you that with the (mostly crappy) cameras a lot of people use combined with the fact that its a dark ride, and meant to be seen in the dark, using the flash is only going to result in a bad picture anyways. You'd think they'd notice after their first picture comes out bad that maybe they should turn the flash off, but nope, apparently not.
Most people won't notice the pictures didn't come out right until after they're home from vacation. It's hard to tell if the photo is blurry or has other problems when you're looking at it on a two- or three-inch screen on the back of a camera.
 

kbmum

Well-Known Member
Sorry, but if you're taking a picture in a dark ride and you don't use the flash, you're an idiot.
That's not necessarily true. Dark ride pictures can be taken without a flash, depending upon the camera, its settings, and the photographer.
 

G00fyDad

Well-Known Member
Sorry, but if you're taking a picture in a dark ride and you don't use the flash, you're an idiot. If you do use the flash, you're rude and an idiot.

Sorry but I disagree. Set the camera for A mode (Aperture Priority Mode) and raise the ISO. Trust me, it works and you get a photo that looks very close to what the naked eye will see. Remember that the higher you raise the ISO the more "noise" you get in the photo. The following photos were taken by me in very dark spots and with A mode on and ISO3200. They may not be the greatest dark ride photos but photos without the flash can be done.


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tdpolo26

Active Member
I think anyone who takes flash photography on a dark ride should be chained to its a small world and be forced to sing the songs for the remainder of the day ....lol
 

CP_alum08

Well-Known Member
And the thing is those photos still come out looking terrible when you get home and pull them up on your computer. People just don't get it.
More so I think it's just that people don't know HOW to turn the flash off, heaven forbid they read the manual!

I am all for drastic measures taken to flash photographers. Maybe not to the extreme of kicking them out of the park, but off the ride, absolutely. There is no other word for it besides rude...well there are, but they aren't G-rated :lol:
 

Polydweller

Well-Known Member
I have been following this thread and trying to figure out how it could be enforced. I would really like to see flash photography stopped but can't see how it can be done. By the way, I have never used flash, my cell phone, or video camera monitor on any ride.

I have been on rides where CMs have been very forceful trying to get someone to stop but that just made everyone else in the ride uncomfortable and instead of improving the experience actually hurt it. The flash was better than the angry attempt at correction.

Stopping a ride to deal with someone would ruin the ride for everyone in the attraction and slow the process for all waiting in line. Besides, the stopped ride then has to be restarted and that may not be a simple process in many attractions from what I've read.

Then there is the idea of dealing with them after the ride. You can bet that would create a really ugly scene in many cases at the end of ride. That would detract from many innocent peoples' experience. Even if you could do this, what would be the correct punishment. Banishment from the parks even for that day seems a bit extreme, and I doubt it would do anything but bring bad press for Disney. You can see the headline 'Disney bans family for taking pictures'. Hmm, we fans would understand but I doubt the general public would get it.

So, yeah, I'd love to see them do it but I don't think it's as easy to do as one think.
 

dkosdros

Active Member
Yes it should be enforced. When I was at Universal a few years ago. I tried taking pictures/videos on Cat in the Hat since it is my nieces favorite. They came on the loudspeaker and told me to stop. So I did. I only did it because we were in a car by ourselves and I didn't think it would take anything away from other guests.

If Disney did the same it would help. However my only concern is when someone hears the command, and continues to flash away. It is bad enough my ride is being ruined with flash but to hear the CM have to interrupt the ride over and over would make for one terrible riding experience.

Would be nice to have the CM at the end of the ride to then pull the guests to the side, scan their ticket to give them a strike or something. All the more reason to get the Nexgen Xpass bracelet thingy in place. :)
 

timoteo

Member
If you take a picture in a Broadway theater you are out on your butt at the next interval, no refund, nothing. Disney is really just a 3d broadway show. Its their theater, its their content, its their audience. I would warn once, warn twice with threat of removal. Third time focus a low frequency beam at the guest which voids there ticket and ask them to leave.
 

Timekeeper

Well-Known Member
Would be nice to have the CM at the end of the ride to then pull the guests to the side, scan their ticket to give them a strike or something. All the more reason to get the Nexgen Xpass bracelet thingy in place. :)
If a guest is only visiting for one day (and does not have a pass that would need to be re-used in the future), what duty would that guest have to hold onto their ticket at all times? Other than the people who want to keep them a souvenirs, others would just as well throw them out. Some people keep their movie ticket stubs as souvenirs, but others toss them once passing all necessary points of admission.

Having security (or any CMs) approach guests and ask them to "see their papers" might be a bit too reminiscent of segments in history that we would rather not be reminded of ...and certain geographical areas in this country where such police action is being heavily debated.

When Disney implemented their guest safety conscious programs years ago, a lot of their effort focused heavily on proactive education and providing guests with additional reminders and information; and even incorporated characters. That's likely the route they will go if they want to decrease the use of flash photography in certain attractions.
 

flynnibus

Premium Member
If a guest is only visiting for one day (and does not have a pass that would need to be re-used in the future), what duty would that guest have to hold onto their ticket at all times? Other than the people who want to keep them a souvenirs, others would just as well throw them out. Some people keep their movie ticket stubs as souvenirs, but others toss them once passing all necessary points of admission.
Now you are just being argumentative...

You know damn well every guest keeps their ticket. Why? Because they need them for FP.. they need them for readmission.. etc. You make it sound like keeping your ticket is some oddity.. when you know damn well it's not.

Having security (or any CMs) approach guests and ask them to "see their papers" might be a bit too reminiscent of segments in history that we would rather not be reminded of ...and certain geographical areas in this country where such police action is being heavily debated.
Which is exactly what they will do if they catch you in something they find offensive.. like trying to sneak into the park... stealing... etc.

Your 'concern' is exaggerated to say the least.
 

captainkidd

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
If you take a picture in a Broadway theater you are out on your butt at the next interval, no refund, nothing. Disney is really just a 3d broadway show. Its their theater, its their content, its their audience. I would warn once, warn twice with threat of removal. Third time focus a low frequency beam at the guest which voids there ticket and ask them to leave.
Excellent point.
 
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