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Kman101

Well-Known Member
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I liked the castle cake I guess ... I appreciate they made the effort they did for the 25th but like everything "temporary" at WDW it overstayed it's welcome but at least it didn't last as long as the BAH or wand.
 

L.C. Clench

Well-Known Member
But surely we can all come together and agree that the 25th anniversary cake castle was a crime against nature and an affront to all that is good and holy, right? Right?!
I liked it. One of my favorite pictures I ever took at Disney was a black and white picture of it. I didn't even mind when they TP'd it but that wand. Blech.
 

Goofyernmost

Well-Known Member
I appreciated the Castle Cake as well. Went there twice that year. I thought it was a imaginative, creative and great way to celebrate the 25th. However, a lot of people take their plastic castles pretty seriously. Personally, I like surprises and thinking outside the box.
 

larryz

Clearly Visible
Premium Member
I appreciated the Castle Cake as well. Went there twice that year. I thought it was a imaginative, creative and great way to celebrate the 25th. However, a lot of people take their plastic castles pretty seriously. Personally, I like surprises and thinking outside the box.
And letting Pandora loose was "thinking outside the box," too... (no reference to DAK intended)
 

creathir

Monorail and PeopleMover Fanatic
Premium Member
So here is a thought: what if the GMR has to be removed, for restructuring of the park layout?

Is it possible the theater itself is detrimental to the general flow of the entire park?

Especially given the alignment of the fireworks launch area.
 

Casper Gutman

Well-Known Member
But surely we can all come together and agree that the 25th anniversary cake castle was a crime against nature and an affront to all that is good and holy, right? Right?!
I liked the cake! It was fun and cheesy and, most of all, it was monumental and showed that WDW could and would still do impressive things. And it never threatened to become permanent, like certain other additions...
 
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marni1971

WDW History nut
Premium Member
I appreciated the Castle Cake as well. Went there twice that year. I thought it was a imaginative, creative and great way to celebrate the 25th. However, a lot of people take their plastic castles pretty seriously. Personally, I like surprises and thinking outside the box.
Complaints about the castles appearance skyrocketed. Apparently it's sacrosanct for those who wanted the once in a lifetime photo in front of it. They expected the quintessential fairy tale castle.
 

Goofyernmost

Well-Known Member
Complaints about the castles appearance skyrocketed. Apparently it's sacrosanct for those who wanted the once in a lifetime photo in front of it. They expected the quintessential fairy tale castle.
I still think that grown ups should be beyond the worship of plastic. My opinion, I know, but, it isn't going to change anytime soon. Seeing the birth of your child is a once in a lifetime activity. Seeing a plastic castle is not. It is beyond suspension of disbelief, it is complete suspension of reality along with the inability to recognize what is important and what isn't.
 

britain

Well-Known Member
I still think that grown ups should be beyond the worship of plastic. My opinion, I know, but, it isn't going to change anytime soon. Seeing the birth of your child is a once in a lifetime activity. Seeing a plastic castle is not. It is beyond suspension of disbelief, it is complete suspension of reality along with the inability to recognize what is important and what isn't.
Well said, and I totally agree. I do think, however, that if you're a going to be married there and you're expecting the castle to provide a proper backdrop to your wedding, you would be pretty disappointed to have the cake version back there.
 

Goofyernmost

Well-Known Member
That is why opinions are important. What doesn't matter to someone matters greatly to another.

The castle mattered to a huge amount of people. Thankfully nothing like it will be done again in Orlando.
You say thankfully, I say tragically. I think that the upset about the cake started us on the path of blandness and sameness that plagues the parks right through today and has stopped us from ever experiencing a lot of new and interesting things. This museum mindset has stopped a lot of creativity and change that is needed to keep the place alive and vibrant. I'm sure that a group of imagineers and TDO were completely demoralized by the reaction to this novel idea and never really made the effort to create new things and excite the public again. For some that is good, but, for me, is the reason that most of the time, I now go to Universal instead. Something that until a few years ago, I would never even have considered.
 

huwar18

Well-Known Member
You say thankfully, I say tragically. I think that the upset about the cake started us on the path of blandness and sameness that plagues the parks right through today and has stopped us from ever experiencing a lot of new and interesting things. This museum mindset has stopped a lot of creativity and change that is needed to keep the place alive and vibrant. I'm sure that a group of imagineers and TDO were completely demoralized by the reaction to this novel idea and never really made the effort to create new things and excite the public again. For some that is good, but, for me, is the reason that most of the time, I now go to Universal instead. Something that until a few years ago, I would never even have considered.
I think that both mindsets can exist at the same time. There is no need to replace iconic attraction with new attractions. There is so much room for expansion that this should never be an issue. Why can't the company update older attractions and add new attractions to expansion pads? Personally, I want new attractions. However, I do not want them to replace iconic attractions with new out of theme or place attractions. I do hear what you are saying. I have a lot of friends who share your feelings.
 

Goofyernmost

Well-Known Member
I think that both mindsets can exist at the same time. There is no need to replace iconic attraction with new attractions. There is so much room for expansion that this should never be an issue. Why can't the company update older attractions and add new attractions to expansion pads? Personally, I want new attractions. However, I do not want them to replace iconic attractions with new out of theme or place attractions. I do hear what you are saying. I have a lot of friends who share your feelings.
I'm only talking about special event creations. I agree totally with the mix in regular attractions. I was there for the change, went twice that year, and the fun of the cake, the whimsy far outweighed the fact that it covered the Castle. There was nothing going on inside, no rides or shows were sacrificed and it was just a fun "temporary" idea. Something we don't really see much of anymore, but, were pretty common in the beginning.
 

wdisney9000

Well-Known Member
I think that the upset about the cake started us on the path of blandness and sameness that plagues the parks right through today and has stopped us from ever experiencing a lot of new and interesting things.
There are tons of new and interesting things to experience. Cabanas, up charge cup cake parties, FP+ viewing areas for shows, express bus service, water and chips from a golf cart in the parking lot, and my personal favorite.....D-Zone at Epcot. That was some serious theming.

I'm sure that a group of imagineers and TDO were completely demoralized by the reaction to this novel idea and never really made the effort to create new things and excite the public again
Or....certain executives decided that cutting the red tape was an easier way to keep the bottom line looking good rather than allowing the Imagineers to create new things and excite the public. Just slap an IP on it and the public will wet their pants and call us geniuses!!!
 
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