Politics 28000 Layoffs coming to Disney's domestic theme parks - statement from Josh D'Amaro

This thread contains political discussion related to the original thread topic

flynnibus

Premium Member
Do you work in the live entertainment industry?

I do. I know the difference between being hired for a gig and being hired full time. They aren’t the same thing.

No job on the planet comes with a guarantee.

Im sorry you are hanging your whole argument on insisting “gig” meaning a singular event instead of what everyone knows the conversation is about. “Their show ends, or their job finishes, and they know they are rotating out unless they find a new chair to sit in.”
 

TrainChasers

Well-Known Member
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Im sorry you are hanging your whole argument on insisting “gig” meaning a singular event instead of what everyone knows the conversation is about. “Their show ends, or their job finishes, and they know they are rotating out unless they find a new chair to sit in.”
I don’t even know what point you are trying to make. That all wdw employees should have expected to be laid off despite their 20-30+ years with the company?
 

flynnibus

Premium Member
I don’t even know what point you are trying to make. That all wdw employees should have expected to be laid off despite their 20-30+ years with the company?

That people in the roles mentioned are used to fluidity in the roles and job outlook.

And anyone who looks at your number of years as some impervious job shield is bound to get blindsided some day (unless you are in a union with seniority ranking). You should always look at your position as based on what value you are able to deliver now and to where the company is headed. Else you’ll be like the film developer at Kodak and jobless regardless of how long and how great you did your old job.
 

wannabeBelle

Well-Known Member
I have spoken with a few friends in Entertainment and they realize that this is a contract type of employment and they can be terminated once the contract is up. That isnt in question. The question that is being discussed is that are all of the layoffs necessary given some other financial decisions made by Disney and is it in the best interest of the company to do that, for multiple reasons.
For example, Off Kilter has a large following and that is still true. Not long ago they did a live stream event that had over 800 people logged in to see them. Not too shabby for a band who was let go from Disney 6 years ago. Would they be an asset to the company if they were re-hired? I would tend to think so and I think I would be more likely to plan a trip to see them than any of the executives that just had their pay restored to pre-pandemic seven figure levels. Marie
 

eliza61nyc

Well-Known Member
I don’t even know what point you are trying to make. That all wdw employees should have expected to be laid off despite their 20-30+ years with the company?


I don’t even know what point you are trying to make. That all wdw employees should have expected to be laid off despite their 20-30+ years with the company?
I think that the job seeker of today is way more realistic than folks on this forum are. Most recognize that unless you get some type of federal, state ,city government job or a unionized job ( teacher, fireman, police) that there is no thing as job security. If you work for a major corporation like Disney, Dow chemicals, HP etc you know for the most part your job is based upon corporate Bean counters.
To act like this is 1965 is a delusion, so no you may not expect to be paid off but you do have to look at the economic situation realistically. DISNEY is not exempted.

I was furloughed for 2 months early in the pandemic, not one person was surprised. Come on, companies are not going to keep 10k people on the books and they weren't even able to work. Personally we were happy they agreed to keep our benefits. I'm not saying it isn't horrible sad, I hate what this pandemic is done to the economy. My oldest son just went and recertificatied for his CDL. Said that if he gets laid off he can easily go back to driving and make a living wage
 
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Goofyernmost

Well-Known Member
Disney used to have "creatives" in high level, influential leadership positions. What you are seeing is what happens when leadership is comprised almost exclusively of business school grads.
Yea, those business school grads are the worst. Wait, I'm a business school grad and we were trained to recognize exactly what it takes to make a business successful and it always fell to sufficient numbers of skilled people to keep things running smoothly and effectively. I think you are trying to say 'when leadership is comprised almost exclusively of cost accountants and retail store clerks.'
 

Mr Mindcrime

Active Member
Yea, those business school grads are the worst. Wait, I'm a business school grad and we were trained to recognize exactly what it takes to make a business successful and it always fell to sufficient numbers of skilled people to keep things running smoothly and effectively. I think you are trying to say 'when leadership is comprised almost exclusively of cost accountants and retail store clerks.'
Thanks for interpreting what I was trying to say....unfortunately that's not what I was trying to say at all. I'm a business school grad myself (pretty famous school in Philadelphia) and a CFO with a CPA license (i.e. bean counter). I completely understand the necessary roles of business school grads. But in my years of experience I've also learned that companies that only rely on bean counters making decisions usually aren't the best companies. A company has to focus and give equal weight to operations and sales and in Disney's case creative products (whether it be movies or theme parks). Sometimes a few, extra beans are worth it for the overall good and longevity of the company. Goofy, let's check back in a couple of years and see if focusing only on the bottom line at the expense of the core product, paid off. The "core product" in this discussion being more than just an amusement park, but rather a theme park resort with lots of tasty little extras.
 

DCBaker

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
"According to an FAQ posted by the union, 1,351 Cast Members will be laid off that previously had positions at various Disneyland attractions. Per the union contract, this puts a lot of Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge Cast Members at risk."

"Layoffs are determined by seniority, and a significant amount of Cast Members transferred over from Disney California Adventure (DCA) to Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge at Disneyland Park. Per the terms of the union contract, those Cast Members would lose their previous seniority because DCA and Disneyland are “separate and distinct entities”.

While Local 495 didn’t specify just how many Cast Members would be laid off per “land”, seniority at Disneyland was given to Cast Members who had worked within Disneyland before March 2018. Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge opened in May 2019, putting all transfers from DCA at risk. Cast Members who transferred within Disneyland are not at risk, per the terms negotiated by the union."

 

nickys

Premium Member
"According to an FAQ posted by the union, 1,351 Cast Members will be laid off that previously had positions at various Disneyland attractions. Per the union contract, this puts a lot of Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge Cast Members at risk."

"Layoffs are determined by seniority, and a significant amount of Cast Members transferred over from Disney California Adventure (DCA) to Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge at Disneyland Park. Per the terms of the union contract, those Cast Members would lose their previous seniority because DCA and Disneyland are “separate and distinct entities”.

While Local 495 didn’t specify just how many Cast Members would be laid off per “land”, seniority at Disneyland was given to Cast Members who had worked within Disneyland before March 2018. Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge opened in May 2019, putting all transfers from DCA at risk. Cast Members who transferred within Disneyland are not at risk, per the terms negotiated by the union."

That’s crazy, and devastating for those involved. Does that happen at WDW too, CMs switched between parks lose seniority and have to start again “building” it?
 

asianway

Well-Known Member
"According to an FAQ posted by the union, 1,351 Cast Members will be laid off that previously had positions at various Disneyland attractions. Per the union contract, this puts a lot of Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge Cast Members at risk."

"Layoffs are determined by seniority, and a significant amount of Cast Members transferred over from Disney California Adventure (DCA) to Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge at Disneyland Park. Per the terms of the union contract, those Cast Members would lose their previous seniority because DCA and Disneyland are “separate and distinct entities”.

While Local 495 didn’t specify just how many Cast Members would be laid off per “land”, seniority at Disneyland was given to Cast Members who had worked within Disneyland before March 2018. Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge opened in May 2019, putting all transfers from DCA at risk. Cast Members who transferred within Disneyland are not at risk, per the terms negotiated by the union."

I’m assuming this goes back to DCA opening? If there is no reciprocity between the contracts, why would anyone have ever moved from DL to DCA in 2000? @Darkbeer1 any insight?
 

Sirwalterraleigh

Premium Member
That’s crazy, and devastating for those involved. Does that happen at WDW too, CMs switched between parks lose seniority and have to start again “building” it?
Unless the rules have changed...seniority is based on hire dates in most locations...it doesn’t reset during transfers

Still...often fresh blood can be just as useful as experience...there won’t be any “fresh blood” left. That’s unfortunate ☹️
 

asianway

Well-Known Member
Unless the rules have changed...seniority is based on hire dates in most locations...it doesn’t reset during transfers

Still...often fresh blood can be just as useful as experience...there won’t be any “fresh blood” left. That’s unfortunate ☹️
I believe it resets if you change unions
 

-em

Well-Known Member
I believe it resets if you change unions
If it’s STCU then no- not sure of the others. A few jobs have seniority date ‘suppression’ for a period of time after transfer but most don’t (I haven’t heard if this affects displacement because that union hasn’t been as transparent)
A 15 year culinary cast will have 15 year seniority in attractions or merchandise.

seniority date is upon becoming Full Time within the union not necessarily your hire date. Very few people original hire date = seniority date.

That is beyond depressing with the Edge ‘West’ cast because as they were probably all hand selected they are among the best of the best..
 

eliza61nyc

Well-Known Member
Thanks for interpreting what I was trying to say....unfortunately that's not what I was trying to say at all. I'm a business school grad myself (pretty famous school in Philadelphia) and a CFO with a CPA license (i.e. bean counter). I completely understand the necessary roles of business school grads. But in my years of experience I've also learned that companies that only rely on bean counters making decisions usually aren't the best companies. A company has to focus and give equal weight to operations and sales and in Disney's case creative products (whether it be movies or theme parks). Sometimes a few, extra beans are worth it for the overall good and longevity of the company. Goofy, let's check back in a couple of years and see if focusing only on the bottom line at the expense of the core product, paid off. The "core product" in this discussion being more than just an amusement park, but rather a theme park resort with lots of tasty little extras.
Lol all I'll say is that, that has been a familiar refrain here for decades. " Just wait a few years_____" every time there is a change the old guard doesn't like. The old "Disney is becoming a six flags" has been predicted for decades now.
And basically it's taken a global pandemic to kill attendance.

So I'm betting on the house, 10 years from now Disney will be packed to the gills and we'll be complaining about crowds again
Now who knows, I've a number of friends who are regular Disney visitors and haven't heard anyone think it's like every other amusement park but they didn't go in the 70-90's so maybe they have nothing to compare it to.
 
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Sirwalterraleigh

Premium Member
Thanks for interpreting what I was trying to say....unfortunately that's not what I was trying to say at all. I'm a business school grad myself (pretty famous school in Philadelphia) and a CFO with a CPA license (i.e. bean counter). I completely understand the necessary roles of business school grads. But in my years of experience I've also learned that companies that only rely on bean counters making decisions usually aren't the best companies. A company has to focus and give equal weight to operations and sales and in Disney's case creative products (whether it be movies or theme parks). Sometimes a few, extra beans are worth it for the overall good and longevity of the company. Goofy, let's check back in a couple of years and see if focusing only on the bottom line at the expense of the core product, paid off. The "core product" in this discussion being more than just an amusement park, but rather a theme park resort with lots of tasty little extras.
Were your records sealed? 😉
 

Robbiem

Well-Known Member
Thanks for interpreting what I was trying to say....unfortunately that's not what I was trying to say at all. I'm a business school grad myself (pretty famous school in Philadelphia) and a CFO with a CPA license (i.e. bean counter). I completely understand the necessary roles of business school grads. But in my years of experience I've also learned that companies that only rely on bean counters making decisions usually aren't the best companies. A company has to focus and give equal weight to operations and sales and in Disney's case creative products (whether it be movies or theme parks). Sometimes a few, extra beans are worth it for the overall good and longevity of the company. Goofy, let's check back in a couple of years and see if focusing only on the bottom line at the expense of the core product, paid off. The "core product" in this discussion being more than just an amusement park, but rather a theme park resort with lots of tasty little extras.

Since the 2008 crash I’ve seen a lot of this in action. Where I worked in transportation we were flooded with MBA type grads who would have gone into financial areas previously. A lot of these didn’t care about the business in the way people who joined previously did and didn't care about the service aspects of the job or take time to understand the people.

the relentless targets and cutting created a culture of fear and back stabbing as people became more and more scared of being laid off in the yearly reorg and culls. Rather than motivating people people did the bear minimum to get by and all the years of good will were lost along with productivity Eventually after several battles against some of these people I lost my job in a cull and ended up having a breakdown which I’ve not really fully recovered from.

please dont get me wring I’m not anti MBA but what you need is a balance of all talents. When one becomes dominant it usually leads to a fall and I fear thats what Disney is going through now
 

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