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The Spirited Seventh Heaven ...

Clamman73

Well-Known Member
Is SDL's Enchanted Storybook Castle too big?
005FWG36jw1eljzip3fpdj30rc153qg5.jpg~original
They can do some nice nightime projections on that castle.
 

mahnamahna101

Well-Known Member
Well yes, Harry did put Disney behind, not once but Twice, with two expansions. FLE didn't bring in the raise in attendance Disney hoped for like Harry has for many years already for Uni Parks.

But lets not forget Disney has its very own Harry coming, hopefully in this decade, Avatar-land. It has a greater potential for stale than Harry. Heck, as I type this and ponder, Avatar is already pretty stale and Disney has barely broke ground, the Disney way, build it even slower than FLE.

Even if Potter does loose popularity, like that Mermaid ride in FLE & DL, we are still dealing with 3 Disney Parks that are very stale and an overlay at Norway isn't going to solve Epcot Future Worlds problems anymore than Avatar is going to make AK a full day park. As for the Studios another name change will not solve its problems, it will take at least a decade to revitalize that park and Disney has a short attention span these days, by the time Disney actually closes a large chunk of all the old attractions, the Corporate sword will come out and they will likely dice the heck out of what they could do and do the minimum instead. Look at what happened to Dwarf Mountain.

Disney World has its direction, it is time share expansion. Corporate Disney's overall direction is stock buy-backs.
One funds the other.
  1. J.K. Rowling is rumored to be writing a continuation of Harry Potter's adventures. Potter's not done, essentially
  2. Pottermore website releases short stories, etc
  3. Fantastic Beasts is being made into a trilogy from November 2016-November 2020.
  4. Great/solid theming can survive without a relevant theme anyways (Splash Mountain is based on what? Where does the Tower of Terror come from? DINOSAUR huh?)
  5. Harry Potter is almost to Star Wars levels of timelessness. By the 2020s, Rowling should have her rumored new stories ready. HP will be 25+ years old. It's not necessarily a fad - and I could see many 4th-6th grade classes reading HP books as part of their reading curriculum in the decades to come.
  6. Universal has invested in durable IPs lately. Transformers - 30+ years. Simpsons - 25+ years. HP - 15+ years. Kong - 80+ years. Universal doesn't invest in the latest flavor anymore (Twister, MIB, Mummy, Shrek, etc). They wait until it's a known commodity that has stayed relevant.
HP isn't going to lose popularity as a land due to its stellar theming. There's still plenty to be recreated for HP (Forbidden Forest, MoM, something from Fantastic Beasts) and high-quality always draws in audiences. If you build it, they will come... and if you maintain it, they will keep on coming.
 

CDavid

Well-Known Member
I know I am probably baiting the psycho tea totalers by saying this, but I remain convinced that if WDW relaxed their alcohol policy for the MK to serve in table service restaurants, BOG wouldn't be a big problem. I've eaten dinner at BOG a number of times -- and I personally think the food is of a lesser quality than most of the other table service options in the MK -- and thats not saying much at all. The reason we continue to eat there is that I think it's flat out moronic to not be able to order a glass of wine or a good beer with dinner. Im not the only one. As a result, we continue to book ADRs at BOG, despite me preferring some of the other options.

I also agree with @PhotoDave219 about the stupidity of not making BOG table service for both meals and that the MK needs more Table service options. I think two more is pushing it...but I think if the MK added one more table service with the same alcohol policy that BOG has -- and then added similar options at Palace, Liberty Tree, Tonys and the Plaza --- this problem would largely go away.

I honestly think the booze has nothing to do with BoG's popularity. They need more restaurants with theming like that.

I agree. I seriously doubt that booze is the reason that people want to eat there.

I strongly suspect an immersive theme - and particularly upgraded menu selections and (much) better food quality - would be the factors which would drive the success of an additional table-service restaurant. I'm a very poor judge as I don't drink, but surely there aren't many people who really make restaurant selections based on the availability of booze. There are some, to be sure, but that's not what is driving the crowds at Be Our Guest.

It would be hilarious if this social media outrage convinces them to keep the hat.

No, that wouldn't be the least bit amusing. It would be a sad commentary on current-day Walt Disney World guests, however.

Actually, if it is centered primarily on social media, how much of an "outrage" can it be, really?
 

TomP

Well-Known Member
Time for a tangent....

To the woman who was getting gas at Wawa on Poinciana Boulevard and 17/92… clearly you work it up got because you're wearing in Epcot winter coat. It's 64° out.

It's not winter, it's not cold, It's absolutely beautiful and gorgeous out. I'm wearing a T-shirt and shorts, there is no need for you to wear your winter coat.

:) Sometimes your comments remind me of that word game "Mad Gab" It took me a minute of reading this one out loud to get it.
(Yeah, I know it's the speech to text thing, but wow. I'm not being mean, it is fun to decipher)
 

Bolna

Well-Known Member
Apparently. :bored:

I knew there was a portion of the Disney fandom that believed that, but I didn't realize how large it was until today. Seems almost like 50%+ of the comments I'm reading on social media are pro-hat.

You weren't around (here on wdwmagic) when the wand came down at Epcot - the number of people saying who sad they were and how this was destroying the Disney magic at Epcot was mind-blowing. Quite a few had to admit afterwards that Spaceship Earth was far improved with out. I think so many people can't visualize something that they never experienced.
 

Bolna

Well-Known Member
But the schnitzel??? For years I frowned on it as bland and boring. Then I spent a semester in Germany, I could not get enough of it in all its variations. The humble schnitzel to jeagerschnitzel and the best of all, schnitzel with egg paired with kertoffel, spargelweiss, and a Krombacher.

Then I had the schnitzel at the Biergarten at Epcot. ...

The Schnitzel is one of the few things that is not that good there. However, at least it is pork now. It used to be chicken. Of course a real Schnitzel ought to be veal (only then it is allowed to be called Wiener Schnitzel, i.e. Schnitzel from Vienna). But in every day life the most common Schnitzel is a pork Schnitzel. It is great because it is from a very lean part of the pig and has very little fat. However, this also means that a good Schnitzel has to be prepared on the spot as otherwise it tends to dry out very quickly. Therefore it is not great for buffets in the first place. If I remember correctly, though, they had a mushroom sauce directly next to the Schnitzel so that you could turn it into a Jägerschnitzel (huntsmen Schnitzel).

View attachment 71248

This is the brauhaus I hung out at in Paderborn.

Aha! Paderborn - this explains why you had something so strange as a Schnitzel with egg! That must be something Northern German! That's the other thing about Biergarten: It is really not very "German" at all, it is far more "Bavarian". Of course, Bavaria is part of Germany. But we do have a lot of regional differences in food. Even beer from Northern Germany is far different from Bavarian beer. So maybe that was part of your disappointment.

Curious what was strange to you, DFIL did an exchange program with Lufthansa in the 70's and he commented that the Biergarten was a representation of a more 'upscale' Biergarten than the ones ordinary Germans frequent.

The one thing that was strange was that it was a buffet restaurant! The only buffets I know in Germany are for breakfast (and there they are common). Also, the whole seating people together things was a bit off. Yes, it is a concept here. But if you go to a standard Bavarian Biergarten, you don't have chairs, but just benches and you just find a spot where you can and you won't be seated. In a more restaurant type context you are generally free to seat yourself as well, but there is less table sharing going on. However, it is totally acceptable to ask if you can take over the other half of a larger table that only has a small group sitting there. However, you would try your best to not talk a lot to the other people at the table, but kind of let them have their privacy. One might make a short comment like saying "Good Appetite" when the others get served their food.

On the food I found the apple sauce being served with the roast pork a bit strange. The pickled beets (Rote Beete) were too sour and not sweet enough. The cheese in the Käsespätzle was far too mild. And the pork Schnitzel was too dry. Those were really the only complaints I had. Oh and the pretzel bread was not as delicious as from my favorite local baker! :p

Otherwise, I was impressed by the original and authentic selection. The cold sausages tasted very authentic, the warm sausages, too. I had the Weißwurst (veal sausage) and it was very good and was served with the correct sweet mustard. Also the normal mustard was definitely German mustard - in my experience every country has a slightly different mustard taste and this was German mustard. I also had the Leberkäse (Disney calls it Veal Meatloaf, but I don't think it is traditionally made out of veal. The literal translation would be liver cheese, but there is neither liver nor cheese in it). That was really good, too! Also, the desserts from the apple strudel to the Rote Grütze were really good.
 

ford91exploder

Resident Curmudgeon
The Schnitzel is one of the few things that is not that good there. However, at least it is pork now. It used to be chicken. Of course a real Schnitzel ought to be veal (only then it is allowed to be called Wiener Schnitzel, i.e. Schnitzel from Vienna). But in every day life the most common Schnitzel is a pork Schnitzel. It is great because it is from a very lean part of the pig and has very little fat. However, this also means that a good Schnitzel has to be prepared on the spot as otherwise it tends to dry out very quickly. Therefore it is not great for buffets in the first place. If I remember correctly, though, they had a mushroom sauce directly next to the Schnitzel so that you could turn it into a Jägerschnitzel (huntsmen Schnitzel).



Aha! Paderborn - this explains why you had something so strange as a Schnitzel with egg! That must be something Northern German! That's the other thing about Biergarten: It is really not very "German" at all, it is far more "Bavarian". Of course, Bavaria is part of Germany. But we do have a lot of regional differences in food. Even beer from Northern Germany is far different from Bavarian beer. So maybe that was part of your disappointment.



The one thing that was strange was that it was a buffet restaurant! The only buffets I know in Germany are for breakfast (and there they are common). Also, the whole seating people together things was a bit off. Yes, it is a concept here. But if you go to a standard Bavarian Biergarten, you don't have chairs, but just benches and you just find a spot where you can and you won't be seated. In a more restaurant type context you are generally free to seat yourself as well, but there is less table sharing going on. However, it is totally acceptable to ask if you can take over the other half of a larger table that only has a small group sitting there. However, you would try your best to not talk a lot to the other people at the table, but kind of let them have their privacy. One might make a short comment like saying "Good Appetite" when the others get served their food.

On the food I found the apple sauce being served with the roast pork a bit strange. The pickled beets (Rote Beete) were too sour and not sweet enough. The cheese in the Käsespätzle was far too mild. And the pork Schnitzel was too dry. Those were really the only complaints I had. Oh and the pretzel bread was not as delicious as from my favorite local baker! :p

Otherwise, I was impressed by the original and authentic selection. The cold sausages tasted very authentic, the warm sausages, too. I had the Weißwurst (veal sausage) and it was very good and was served with the correct sweet mustard. Also the normal mustard was definitely German mustard - in my experience every country has a slightly different mustard taste and this was German mustard. I also had the Leberkäse (Disney calls it Veal Meatloaf, but I don't think it is traditionally made out of veal. The literal translation would be liver cheese, but there is neither liver nor cheese in it). That was really good, too! Also, the desserts from the apple strudel to the Rote Grütze were really good.

Thank you @Bolna

Agree with you on the schnitzel my great grandmother was Hungarian and she used to make a mix of German and Hungarian dishes. Overall Biergarten is one of my favorites because where I live good German food is hard to come by.

I have never had the good fortune to visit Germany perhaps some time but most of my non us travel is to Asia and India
 
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Mike S

Well-Known Member
  1. J.K. Rowling is rumored to be writing a continuation of Harry Potter's adventures. Potter's not done, essentially
  2. Pottermore website releases short stories, etc
  3. Fantastic Beasts is being made into a trilogy from November 2016-November 2020.
  4. Great/solid theming can survive without a relevant theme anyways (Splash Mountain is based on what? Where does the Tower of Terror come from? DINOSAUR huh?)
  5. Harry Potter is almost to Star Wars levels of timelessness. By the 2020s, Rowling should have her rumored new stories ready. HP will be 25+ years old. It's not necessarily a fad - and I could see many 4th-6th grade classes reading HP books as part of their reading curriculum in the decades to come.
  6. Universal has invested in durable IPs lately. Transformers - 30+ years. Simpsons - 25+ years. HP - 15+ years. Kong - 80+ years. Universal doesn't invest in the latest flavor anymore (Twister, MIB, Mummy, Shrek, etc). They wait until it's a known commodity that has stayed relevant.
HP isn't going to lose popularity as a land due to its stellar theming. There's still plenty to be recreated for HP (Forbidden Forest, MoM, something from Fantastic Beasts) and high-quality always draws in audiences. If you build it, they will come... and if you maintain it, they will keep on coming.
MIB and Mummy may not be as popular as they once were but they did make great rides out of them. MIB is the best shooter ride in Orlando imo.
 

DC0703

Well-Known Member
I strongly suspect an immersive theme - and particularly upgraded menu selections and (much) better food quality - would be the factors which would drive the success of an additional table-service restaurant. I'm a very poor judge as I don't drink, but surely there aren't many people who really make restaurant selections based on the availability of booze. There are some, to be sure, but that's not what is driving the crowds at Be Our Guest.

I too think it is the theming. It's a very elaborate restaurant, much moreso than the others in MK. And it's a way to get fairy tale castle/princess type dining without the $$$$ of Cinderella's Royal Table. On top of that, the food is actually pretty good there (I had the pot roast for lunch and loved it) and the prices aren't bad (relative to Disney, of course).

I hope that the restaurant's success encourages the powers that be to put more restaurants in MK with a detailed theme like that. Given the profit potential, I would think this is one type of addition that the bean counters would actually approve.
 

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