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Surprise! Red Tier Now Begins Sunday; Downtown Disney Restaurants???

Darkbeer1

Well-Known Member
California's health order falling on many deaf ears (apnews.com)

>>Paz Jackson, a registered nurse, said she and her husband took the half-hour drive from Los Angeles to Manhattan Beach to eat lunch outdoors — something they can no longer do near their home.

She said she felt safe grabbing a burger and taking it to the public patio as there were few people and no crowds. But she said she understands why Newsom issued the order, especially in larger cities where the virus is surging.

“We love to eat outside,” she said. “A lot of people would like to go out and not be staying at home all the time. It’s an individual decision.”<<
 

Darkbeer1

Well-Known Member
Found the reason why St. Vincent wasn't reopened as a Surge Hospital.

Blame Disney/ABC, LA Times and others....

Los Angeles Surge Hospital That Treated COVID-19 Patients Now Appears To Be Site Of Full-Scale Hollywood Production | CauseACTION Clarion

>>As California officials warn about an impending wave of COVID-19 infections, a shuttered hospital in Los Angeles that briefly reopened in the spring to help treat an expected surge of cases now appears to be the site of a major Hollywood production.

The parking lot of the former St. Vincent Medical Center is currently filled with trailers typically used by movie studios and television production companies for on-location shoots. A truck from a company called Cinelease, which describes itself as “a market leader in lighting and grip equipment rentals,” sits nearby. Tents cover outdoor dining areas and a line of cooks, who are busy preparing food.

There’s filming happening at St. Vincent Hospital AKA the abandoned hospital that was reopened for 39 days as Los Angeles Surge Hospital. Dr. Anand Annamalai called LASH “a clinically led socialistic system.”
Pictures via @BlueShell_Party pic.twitter.com/SEOPR72go4
— Brittani Nichols (@BisHilarious) December 7, 2020
What could be interpreted as a makeshift crew parking sign pointing to an indoor lot reads “TRIAGE,” a common word around hospitals but also the name of a pilot greenlit by ABC executives earlier this year.

After a shortage of intensive-care unit beds triggered a regional stay-at-home order throughout Southern California and beyond, public health authorities have been warning of a wave of new infections from Thanksgiving gatherings that is about to hit.

Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong, a billionaire who owns The Los Angeles Times, purchased the former 366-bed hospital out of bankruptcy earlier this year for $135 million. After a federal judge approved the sale on April 10, The Times reported that its owner “plans to create a coronavirus research facility on the campus” that would “attract doctors and experts on the virus” and “relieve pressure on other hospitals.”

The bankruptcy judge conveyed a sense of urgency for the parties to complete the transaction. Judge Ernest M. Robles wrote, “there is a risk that the purchaser will walk away if the sale does not close promptly, since the purpose of the sale – establishing a research center to address the COVID-19 pandemic – would be defeated absent a prompt closing.”

As the L.A. Times reported at the time:

Before Soon-Shiong purchased the hospital, the state announced in March that it would lease the empty hospital. The state is paying $16 million for a six-month lease, an agreement that’s now been transferred to Soon-Shiong.
The state is also paying healthcare companies Kaiser Permanente and Dignity Health a monthly management fee of $500,000 each to oversee the hospital.
The state will also pay for equipment and hospital staff. The total cost will depend on the number and acuity of patients treated, said Rodger Butler, a spokesman with the California Health and Human Services Agency.
The temporary state-funded hospital opened on the St. Vincent complex on April 13, three days after the bankruptcy judge approved the property’s sale to Soon-Shiong.

State officials said the pop-up facility was needed to secure additional beds to treat COVID-19 patients. Democratic Governor Gavin Newsom had said California would need 50,000 more beds to respond to what was to come. Called the Los Angeles Surge Hospital (LASH), it only admitted coronavirus patients who met certain criteria.

So @GavinNewsom & @MayorOfLA is that Mercy medical ship coming back? What about that backup hospital in the L.A.? St Vincent Medical Center? #COVID19
— Mia Alanis (@MiaAlanisPR) December 9, 2020
However, state officials closed LASH after just 39 days in operation and only treating 64 patients. Nine of them died.

Area hospitals were not overwhelmed, and the expected wave of sick people did not materialize. LASH never had more than 25 patients at a time and only grew to 63 beds, far short of its projected capacity of 266.

As The Times reported, “In time, the initial COVID-19 surge in Los Angeles County became more manageable,” and:

Operating costs for the surge hospital through May 31, according to the Governor’s Office of Emergency Services, were $21.5 million which covered medical treatments and physician salaries, as well as food services and the lease on the property.
Dr. Jamie Taylor, who worked at St. Vincent and LASH, told The Times in July that she did not expect another surge hospital to open on the property.

The lease with the state reportedly expired on September 30.

The L.A. City Council voted unanimously in October to initiate discussions with Dr. Soon-Shiong or his foundation about establishing a partnership to provide medical and mental health services to homeless people, older adults, and low-income residents in need of acute care.

Last month, it was announced that Dr. Soon-Shiong hired a brokerage firm to lease and reposition the 674,000 square-foot, five-building medical complex.

@thelapod @safrazie @hayesdavenport @awalkerinLA if you’re wondering why the city isn’t setting up St Vincent’s Hospital for the covid increase, it’s cus (once again) city is prioritizing filming.
Supposedly a pilot. Def shooting inside(saw crew exiting entrance) pic.twitter.com/Hx5cKg8eGs
— Blue Shell Party (@BlueShell_Party) December 7, 2020
“The St. Vincent’s Medical Center campus is one of Los Angeles’ premier properties that will help boost the region’s economy and strengthen its position in the medical and life science industries,” said JLL Executive Vice President Chris Isola. “The 7.5-acre campus presents a rare opportunity for a company to position itself as a market leader and attract highly skilled professionals in a competitive workforce environment.”<<
 

TP2000

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
Just walked by a Buffalo Wild Wings in a nearby city. Full service on the patio.

I saw the exact same thing at my local shopping center a hew hours ago! The Buffalo Wild Wings, a Chipotle, and a local pizza joint all had their outdoor patios going full tilt tonight. If it scares you to eat outdoors, don't go.

This morning I texted my barber for an appointment next week, and his shop has gone into Speakeasy Mode where they put black plastic over the front windows and lock the front door. But then you go in the back door instead. The young barbers that staff my barbershop seem to like it this way, because they can drink beer and offer the customers shots of Jack Daniels, and it just makes the whole thing more fun. They're getting bigger tips in Speakeasy Mode also, so I don't blame them one bit. It's hysterical! 🤣

But if you are fine with the quick risk analysis based on your own circumstances, which is exactly what Newsom did when he decided it was fine for him to dine indoors at The French Laundry with 10 other people not in his household, then you should be able to eat outdoors, or get a manicure, or get your hairdo did like Aunt Nancy.

The only sad part is that the big corporate players, like Downtown Disney, are stuck having to play by the rules while all their smaller or locally owned competition in OC ignores Newsom's latest orders. Downtown Disney is now a ghost town, while Irvine Spectrum and South Coast Plaza and your local Buffalo Wild Wings or Habit Burger are booming, often in open defiance of Sacramento.

You have to weight the risks and the benefits. God knows I certainly have been doing that for many years now. 🧐
 
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drizgirl

Well-Known Member
Found the reason why St. Vincent wasn't reopened as a Surge Hospital.

Blame Disney/ABC, LA Times and others....

Los Angeles Surge Hospital That Treated COVID-19 Patients Now Appears To Be Site Of Full-Scale Hollywood Production | CauseACTION Clarion

>>As California officials warn about an impending wave of COVID-19 infections, a shuttered hospital in Los Angeles that briefly reopened in the spring to help treat an expected surge of cases now appears to be the site of a major Hollywood production.

The parking lot of the former St. Vincent Medical Center is currently filled with trailers typically used by movie studios and television production companies for on-location shoots. A truck from a company called Cinelease, which describes itself as “a market leader in lighting and grip equipment rentals,” sits nearby. Tents cover outdoor dining areas and a line of cooks, who are busy preparing food.


What could be interpreted as a makeshift crew parking sign pointing to an indoor lot reads “TRIAGE,” a common word around hospitals but also the name of a pilot greenlit by ABC executives earlier this year.

After a shortage of intensive-care unit beds triggered a regional stay-at-home order throughout Southern California and beyond, public health authorities have been warning of a wave of new infections from Thanksgiving gatherings that is about to hit.

Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong, a billionaire who owns The Los Angeles Times, purchased the former 366-bed hospital out of bankruptcy earlier this year for $135 million. After a federal judge approved the sale on April 10, The Times reported that its owner “plans to create a coronavirus research facility on the campus” that would “attract doctors and experts on the virus” and “relieve pressure on other hospitals.”

The bankruptcy judge conveyed a sense of urgency for the parties to complete the transaction. Judge Ernest M. Robles wrote, “there is a risk that the purchaser will walk away if the sale does not close promptly, since the purpose of the sale – establishing a research center to address the COVID-19 pandemic – would be defeated absent a prompt closing.”

As the L.A. Times reported at the time:


The temporary state-funded hospital opened on the St. Vincent complex on April 13, three days after the bankruptcy judge approved the property’s sale to Soon-Shiong.

State officials said the pop-up facility was needed to secure additional beds to treat COVID-19 patients. Democratic Governor Gavin Newsom had said California would need 50,000 more beds to respond to what was to come. Called the Los Angeles Surge Hospital (LASH), it only admitted coronavirus patients who met certain criteria.


However, state officials closed LASH after just 39 days in operation and only treating 64 patients. Nine of them died.

Area hospitals were not overwhelmed, and the expected wave of sick people did not materialize. LASH never had more than 25 patients at a time and only grew to 63 beds, far short of its projected capacity of 266.

As The Times reported, “In time, the initial COVID-19 surge in Los Angeles County became more manageable,” and:


Dr. Jamie Taylor, who worked at St. Vincent and LASH, told The Times in July that she did not expect another surge hospital to open on the property.

The lease with the state reportedly expired on September 30.

The L.A. City Council voted unanimously in October to initiate discussions with Dr. Soon-Shiong or his foundation about establishing a partnership to provide medical and mental health services to homeless people, older adults, and low-income residents in need of acute care.

Last month, it was announced that Dr. Soon-Shiong hired a brokerage firm to lease and reposition the 674,000 square-foot, five-building medical complex.


“The St. Vincent’s Medical Center campus is one of Los Angeles’ premier properties that will help boost the region’s economy and strengthen its position in the medical and life science industries,” said JLL Executive Vice President Chris Isola. “The 7.5-acre campus presents a rare opportunity for a company to position itself as a market leader and attract highly skilled professionals in a competitive workforce environment.”<<
You know, honestly, if they wrote this into a script for a movie about a pandemic, I wouldn't believe it.
 

Stevek

Well-Known Member
That's not an invalid question. But you could also ask the following...

Most old humans die. So how many of these old humans dying actually count because they died due to Covid and not just during Covid?

Just ribbing of course! I'm in a Friday kind of mood, as I'm headed up to Solvang this weekend for a big dose of Scandinavian Christmas cheer! (The entire city is refusing to close outdoor dining and shopping) Have a great weekend, gang! 🎅
High Roller Tiki Bar. Owned by a former Disneyland CM. Right in the middle of town.
 

el_super

Well-Known Member
OC ICU capacity down to 2.3%. County doctors begging people to take these directives seriously.

Dr. Clayton Chau, who was foisted into the position of County Health Director in a sad attempt to skirt a mask order, is now also begging people. “I’m begging you. Do not gather. Do not mix households. The transmission is really high in the community right now.”
 

drizgirl

Well-Known Member
OC ICU capacity down to 2.3%. County doctors begging people to take these directives seriously.

Dr. Clayton Chau, who was foisted into the position of County Health Director in a sad attempt to skirt a mask order, is now also begging people. “I’m begging you. Do not gather. Do not mix households. The transmission is really high in the community right now.”
I doubt that what's happening now is within their control within a mostly free society. I really think it's coming from irresponsible people gathering in homes, and with Christmas coming, it's just going to be ugly. I honestly think that the heavy handed measures have made things worse instead of better.
 

Sonconato

Well-Known Member
I was waiting in line at SeaWorld for the bathroom and the woman in front of me was saying that she had been to Disney World for a few days and Busch Gardens. I heard her say she was from California and couldn't understand why Disney California was closed. All the theme parks in Florida she had been to were very strict on the mask policy but she was just so happy to be at the theme parks. I was happy for her.
 

el_super

Well-Known Member
I doubt that what's happening now is within their control within a mostly free society. I really think it's coming from irresponsible people gathering in homes, and with Christmas coming, it's just going to be ugly. I honestly think that the heavy handed measures have made things worse instead of better.

I disagree. Having things like outdoor dining and malls open, only promote a sense of normalcy and safety when there clearly is none. If these were closed, people may be willing to understand the severity of the situation and be willing to make the sacrifice of not meeting friends and family.
 

drizgirl

Well-Known Member
I disagree. Having things like outdoor dining and malls open, only promote a sense of normalcy and safety when there clearly is none. If these were closed, people may be willing to understand the severity of the situation and be willing to make the sacrifice of not meeting friends and family.
Not shockingly, I disagree. I think being out doing normal things in a safe way reminds people of the distancing and wearing masks. With all these things closed, people are hanging out in private residences without either masks or distancing. They're living in a pre-pandemic fashion and likely mixing with others doing the same. I think it's causing them to mingle with friends and family more rather than less.
 

el_super

Well-Known Member
Not shockingly, I disagree. I think being out doing normal things in a safe way reminds people of the distancing and wearing masks. With all these things closed, people are hanging out in private residences without either masks or distancing. They're living in a pre-pandemic fashion and likely mixing with others doing the same. I think it's causing them to mingle with friends and family more rather than less.

But the numbers we are seeing hitting the hospitals now, are the people who were meeting friends and family, eating out at restaurants and shopping as a group, prior to the introduction of the newest restrictions. Which means, while all those things were open, hospitalizations got worse.

As time goes on, the the outcome of the current restrictions become known, we should see hospitalizations decrease. If that doesn't happen though, more things will need to close.
 

drizgirl

Well-Known Member
But the numbers we are seeing hitting the hospitals now, are the people who were meeting friends and family, eating out at restaurants and shopping as a group, prior to the introduction of the newest restrictions. Which means, while all those things were open, hospitalizations got worse.

As time goes on, the the outcome of the current restrictions become known, we should see hospitalizations decrease. If that doesn't happen though, more things will need to close.
I guess we'll have to see if numbers rise or drop going forward.
 

lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
OC ICU capacity down to 2.3%. County doctors begging people to take these directives seriously.

Dr. Clayton Chau, who was foisted into the position of County Health Director in a sad attempt to skirt a mask order, is now also begging people. “I’m begging you. Do not gather. Do not mix households. The transmission is really high in the community right now.”
I don’t like some politicians so I’m not going to listen to doctors.
 

Darkbeer1

Well-Known Member
I don’t like some politicians so I’m not going to listen to doctors.

But we have a facility that can add ICU Capacity, but since it is owned by the owner of the LA Times, and helped get many things passed on the Ballot the way the Governor wanted. No need to force them to shut down. No you have a large TV crew mingling in it, making money.

Can't shut them down to allow the Hospital to be used as a Surge Hospital. Heck, it was a Surge Hospital earlier this year.

Instead we have an old Mental Hospital to be used as a Field Hospital that can only accept stabilized COVID patients.

But we can shut down many other businesses.

What is wrong with this picture?
 

mandstaft

Well-Known Member
Months of not meeting with family or having to close businesses and be unemployed are also great causes of stress and deteriorating mental health. It's not just physical health we need to think of. Those who don't understand that these issues are also a big health risk are not looking at the whole picture.
 

Club Cooloholic

Well-Known Member
Not shockingly, I disagree. I think being out doing normal things in a safe way reminds people of the distancing and wearing masks. With all these things closed, people are hanging out in private residences without either masks or distancing. They're living in a pre-pandemic fashion and likely mixing with others doing the same. I think it's causing them to mingle with friends and family more rather than less.
I agree with keeping things open(not just for mental health but these businesses need it). If people follow the rules, life can go on with more things open. The issue is some people make NOT following the rules a sort of mission, and it screws it up for everyone.
 

Darkbeer1

Well-Known Member
She Couldn't Open for Outdoor Dining. The Film Crew Next Door Could. (yahoo.com)

>>For more than a week, tensions have flared between Los Angeles restaurant owners and politicians over the county’s ban on outdoor dining, which health officials say is necessary to slow the surging pandemic — and restaurateurs say is destroying their livelihoods.

The controversy came to a head Saturday when a restaurant owner shared a video on social media showing tents, tables and chairs set up as a catering station for a film crew — just feet away from her eatery’s similar outdoor dining space, which has sat empty since the restriction went into effect late last month.

“Tell me that this is dangerous, but right next to me — as a slap in my face — that’s safe?” Angela Marsden, who owns the restaurant, Pineapple Hill Saloon & Grill, said as the video panned from her outdoor dining space to the film crew’s catering site.<<

 

lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
But we have a facility that can add ICU Capacity, but since it is owned by the owner of the LA Times, and helped get many things passed on the Ballot the way the Governor wanted. No need to force them to shut down. No you have a large TV crew mingling in it, making money.

Can't shut them down to allow the Hospital to be used as a Surge Hospital. Heck, it was a Surge Hospital earlier this year.

Instead we have an old Mental Hospital to be used as a Field Hospital that can only accept stabilized COVID patients.

But we can shut down many other businesses.

What is wrong with this picture?
Doctors aren’t asking for more physical space. There isn’t enough staff.
 

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