News Star Wars Galactic Starcruiser coming to Walt Disney World 2021

VaderTron

Well-Known Member
If there's anything about fire exits it's that they should depend upon some rube goldberg mechanism in order to become accessible to everybody.

I'm just thankful nothing ever mechanically fails. Especially something that lowers a door lip every time someone comes within 5 feet of it. It probably only happens a couple hundred times a day.
So true. We wouldn't want to have to rely on devices that detect smoke before sounding an alarm and turning on emergency lighting, or waiting for high heat to trigger the sprinkler system. We should just have those alarms sounding at all times, the sprinklers running all day every day and emergency lighting always on. That way we don't have any failures.

We should also remove all doors from buildings because we wouldn't want to take the chance that the automatic opener has an electrical fault.

There's enough red tape holding back ingenuity today. Why wrap every idea with miles more?:hilarious:
 

corran horn

Well-Known Member
So true. We wouldn't want to have to rely on devices that detect smoke before sounding an alarm and turning on emergency lighting, or waiting for high heat to trigger the sprinkler system. We should just have those alarms sounding at all times, the sprinklers running all day every day and emergency lighting always on. That way we don't have any failures.
Do you think a smoke alarm is anywhere near as mechanically complex as what you're talking about?
 

VaderTron

Well-Known Member
Do you think a smoke alarm is anywhere near as mechanically complex as what you're talking about?
What I'm talking about is as complex as an automatic door opener; something that is used hundreds of times a day at nearly every commercial store.

It could be designed to automatically retract to flush level during a fault (gravity). Seriously, it was something I gave a few minutes' thought to. The whole point is, let the guys who get paid the big bucks figure out the "how". It's doable. The problem is well illustrated by what I have experienced. When there's an issue brought up it's easier (and sadly expected these days) that the idea will be abandoned for status quo rather than finding solutions to the problems it presents.

That tenacity to make the impossible happen (outside of the digital/fake world) is mostly dead at Disney.
 
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danlb_2000

Premium Member
So true. We wouldn't want to have to rely on devices that detect smoke before sounding an alarm and turning on emergency lighting, or waiting for high heat to trigger the sprinkler system. We should just have those alarms sounding at all times, the sprinklers running all day every day and emergency lighting always on. That way we don't have any failures.

We should also remove all doors from buildings because we wouldn't want to take the chance that the automatic opener has an electrical fault.

There's enough red tape holding back ingenuity today. Why wrap every idea with miles more?:hilarious:

Do you know how fire sprinklers work? There isn't some complex mechanism that detects a fire and turns them on. They have something in the sprinkler head the melts when it gets hot which releases the water. Extremely simple mechanism so it can be relied on in an emergency.
 

lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
What I'm talking about is as complex as an automatic door opener; something that is used hundreds of times a day at nearly every commercial store.

It could be designed to automatically retract to flush level during a fault (gravity). Seriously, it was something I gave a few minutes' thought to. The whole point is, let the guys who get paid the big bucks figure out the "how". It's doable. The problem is well illustrated by what I have experienced. When there's an issue brought up it's easier (and sadly expected these days) that the idea will be abandoned for status quo rather than finding solutions to the problems it presents.

That tenacity to make the impossible happen (outside of the digital/fake world) is mostly dead at Disney.
There are things called prescribed codes which means you have to do what they say.
 

Wendy Pleakley

Well-Known Member
1639430663856.png
 

VaderTron

Well-Known Member
Do you know how fire sprinklers work? There isn't some complex mechanism that detects a fire and turns them on. They have something in the sprinkler head the melts when it gets hot which releases the water. Extremely simple mechanism so it can be relied on in an emergency.
So true. We wouldn't want to have to rely on devices that detect smoke before sounding an alarm and turning on emergency lighting, or waiting for high heat to trigger the sprinkler system. We should just have those alarms sounding at all times, the sprinklers running all day every day and emergency lighting always on. That way we don't have any failures.

We should also remove all doors from buildings because we wouldn't want to take the chance that the automatic opener has an electrical fault.

There's enough red tape holding back ingenuity today. Why wrap every idea with miles more?:hilarious:
No complex mechanism in an automatic door. The technology has been around for decades.

Y'all keep the pointless "buts" coming trashing a hypothetical suggestion. This is why Disney won't try anything interesting. The pushback is so tiring. Every miniscule detail is debated and denounced. It's easier to hand out an overly cautious but mediocre product and hit the mute button so they don't hear the complaints of nothing new, authentic or exciting.
 

VaderTron

Well-Known Member
Do you know how fire sprinklers work? There isn't some complex mechanism that detects a fire and turns them on. They have something in the sprinkler head the melts when it gets hot which releases the water. Extremely simple mechanism so it can be relied on in an emergency.

Relied on 88% of the time.

ScreenHunter 227.png



*Source: NFPA.org
 

networkpro

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
Yes
Womder how.fast


Here's a reference I think they were using when they designed this "hotel" given it external appearace

U.S. Department of Justice National Institute of Corrections JAIL DESIGN GUIDE A Resource for Small and Medium-Sized Jails

 

peter11435

Well-Known Member
No complex mechanism in an automatic door. The technology has been around for decades.

Y'all keep the pointless "buts" coming trashing a hypothetical suggestion. This is why Disney won't try anything interesting. The pushback is so tiring. Every miniscule detail is debated and denounced. It's easier to hand out an overly cautious but mediocre product and hit the mute button so they don't hear the complaints of nothing new, authentic or exciting.
You can’t “try anything interesting” when it comes to codes. The thing about automatic doors is that they are designed to be pushed open from the inside in an emergency.

So far the galactic starcruiser seems like an epic fail of design and execution but not because they didn’t violate fire codes.
 

TikibirdLand

Well-Known Member
So true. We wouldn't want to have to rely on devices that detect smoke before sounding an alarm and turning on emergency lighting, or waiting for high heat to trigger the sprinkler system. We should just have those alarms sounding at all times, the sprinklers running all day every day and emergency lighting always on. That way we don't have any failures.

We should also remove all doors from buildings because we wouldn't want to take the chance that the automatic opener has an electrical fault.

There's enough red tape holding back ingenuity today. Why wrap every idea with miles more?:hilarious:
Well, that would certainly be immersive. If I was on the planet Kamino...
 

Cesar R M

Well-Known Member
The perfect analogy for the Galactic Starcruiser :)
Indeed, big reveal, big cheer.. then collapse...
Relied on 88% of the time.

View attachment 607095


*Source: NFPA.org
With no maintenance, even the most reliable devices will collapse and fail.

Here's a reference I think they were using when they designed this "hotel" given it external appearace

U.S. Department of Justice National Institute of Corrections JAIL DESIGN GUIDE A Resource for Small and Medium-Sized Jails

Do you recon if in another life.. Chapek was the Shawshank Redemption's Warden? XD
 

mmascari

Well-Known Member
You can’t “try anything interesting” when it comes to codes. The thing about automatic doors is that they are designed to be pushed open from the inside in an emergency.
On a technical level, it'll be interesting to see if that's how access to the real windows in rooms is handled.

Is there some emergency panel that can be pushed open to gain access to the window. Ready for the rescue team to break the glass from the outside and then save you with the truck ladder/lift.

Is it worth the fine for breaking open the interior cover, when there isn't actually an emergency, enough for a blogger to do it.

Those plastic bubbles over hallway fire extinguishers were expensive enough back in college. I cannot imagine the cost to repair the cabin emergency panel. I assume it'll be a little harder to actually open then those bubbles were.
 

UNCgolf

Well-Known Member
It's...it's not supposed to look like a spaceship from the outside.

I agree, but I don't think that was their point -- I think they were just using Bay Lake as an example of curves. The idea of curved hallways is a pretty good one that would definitely help sell the illusion that you were in something other than just a rectangular building.

With that said, they probably wouldn't work based on the Halcyon's supposed exterior. It's not a curved vessel and the windows are in a straight line down the hull in the concept art.
 
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TikibirdLand

Well-Known Member
It should have.
Not sure why it should have... As part of the story, this isn't the Halcyon. It's the cruiseship terminal. You take transport up to the actual ship. For all you know, you're looking at some warehouses or offices that support the terminal and ship.

I guess you're either into the story or not. If it was a few hundred bucks, I'm in. At a few thousand, I'm out. But, I'm also looking forward to hear from the real passengers (not the vloggers who got invited on this).

Kinda reminds me of the Michael Strahan's free "trip" to outer space (what was it? 10 minutes?). ABC ( Disney Company has been milking the trip for at least a month now, showing his "training" and preparations for the trip. Talk about over-saturation of Blue Origin. Looks like Disney is trying to copy that model for the star cruiser.
 

JoeCamel

Well-Known Member
I agree, but I don't think that was their point -- I think they were just using Bay Lake as an example of curves. The idea of curved hallways is a pretty good one that would definitely help sell the illusion that you were in something other than just a rectangular building.

With that said, they probably wouldn't work based on the Halcyon's supposed exterior. It's not a curved vessel.
I'm pretty sure they used the curved hallways on the space shows to control the sightlines and give the impression you are in an aerodynamic vehicle that can navigate through an atmosphere. This is something that was built in space and never meant to leave space hence the need for shuttles. No need for anything but a space freighter box
 

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