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News Paradise Pier Becoming Pixar Pier

ixjr

Well-Known Member
I mean, it’s going to be as Victorian as ever - more so in spots, since some vestiges of DCA 1.0 will be upgraded. The coaster line area will be a clashing mid-century, but right now that area is themed to Six Flags, so it’s kind of a sideways move.
Ironic. 11 years ago Disney never fully addressed the queue of California Screamin'. They are now, but it will still illustrate as a stylistic clash. The entire Pier was initially designed to show the heyday of the boardwalk. Screamin' was designed to resemble a classic wooden coaster. However its entire queue, marquee, and Fastpass machines scream 1950's hotrod... Its paint scheme and launch sequence exploit 1960's surfing culture... It's being redesigned but with the same modern mid-century mentality only now with a residential purpose. How is any of this the Victorian heyday of a beach side boardwalk?

This goes back to why, in its inception, California Adventure failed and why six years later the billion dollar investment wasn't as thoughtfully genuine. I think a lot of people thought portions of DCA would try to capture what Main Street initially did. They hoped that DCA would give you romantically historic glimpses of California's past. Instead you are currently greeted with a little bit of everything. Creatively speaking Buena Vista Street would be a return to the old tradition. It would attempt to transport you into a romantic view of LA's past. Unfortunately the efforts of Buena Vista Street is lost because around the corner lies Cars Land. For every step forward another is taken in the opposite direction.

Paradise Pier's promise of an intricately themed Victorian boardwalk has been abandoned. Sure, the Sun Wheel got overlayed with characters then but it's being done again now. However still, Walt Disney Imagineering doesn't see a need to address its queue to anything other than Six Flags. King Triton's Carousel was supposed to get a wood lattice permanent structure early on. Instead, it will still stand as a tacky testament to cheapness only now with a Pixar overlay. This statement is even more powerful when you look right past it to the intricate gingerbread details of Toy Story Midway Mania. Incredicoaster is a lost cause, as the 1950's and 60's will still remain only now with more characters.
 
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Thank you for the reminder. Most of Pixar Pier is going to be an upgrade from its current stucco-and-cement circa 2001 vestiges. Agreed that Incredicoaster queue is a sideways move, but the onboard experience should be an upgrade.

The one thing that may stick out like a sore thumb is Jessie's carousel. For the last 17 years that was a cheap dress-up of a carousel, plopped on a cement pad surrounded by painted stucco. While technically they are upgrading it, I think it's going to look weird wedged in between mod Incredicoaster and lavishly Victorian Midway Mania. But we'll see.

The boardwalk around the Fun Wheel will be a nice big plus if it ends up like the renderings. And what they're replacing was even the "plussed up" version that they did in 2012, which was an improvement over the even cheaper looking 2001 version.

I'm totally fine with this look going away...

What? Have we finally turned the corner on this debate?
 
I just realized that each individual neighborhood represents a different location/time period.

The entrance neighborhood represents modern day boardwalks, with grand buildings and entrance points and modern designs inside Knick's Knacks and Lamplight Lounge.

Ex. Screen Shot 2018-04-15 at 6.47.52 PM.png

The Incredibles neighborhood represents the middle of the century boardwalks with The Incredicoaster.

The Toy Story neighborhood represents the 70s style boardwalks with grand architecture and giant structures (Jessie).
Ex.


The Pixar Neighborhood represents the 1920s Victorian Boardwalks we all love.

1523834389074.png

And the Inside Out Neighborhood represents the funky, bright colored boardwalks of the early-21st century.

Ex. 1523834512346.png

So if you think about it in a way, Pixar Pier is a journey through the boardwalks of the past into the present day. It still takes you back to places in periods of time. The only thing I can't get over is the Toy Story Critter Carousel. That just seems like "oh keep the steel structure, nobody will notice with the Giant Jessie distracting them".
 

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This goes back to why, in its inception, California Adventure failed and why six years later the billion dollar investment wasn't as thoughtfully genuine. I think a lot of people thought portions of DCA would try to capture what Main Street initially did.
I get your point, and somewhat agree, but let's be honest, Main Street isn't really any more authentic at representing a small Midwestern town than Pixar Pier is at representing an early 20th century California seaside pier. For me Main Street has always felt exactly like what it is: a very nice welcome/exit to Disneyland with adequately themed turn-of-the-century shops and restaurants.

To me the most egregious aspect of PP is the unnecessary Pixar storytelling. If they had toned down the IP a bit some of the incongruous new theming might be forgivable. Considering this, I think what many people are reacting to is the fact that they're transforming Paradise Pier into something that looks like a thinly veiled experiential advertisement for Pixar Studios.
 
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TROR

Well-Known Member
I just realized that each individual neighborhood represents a different location/time period.

The entrance neighborhood represents modern day boardwalks, with grand buildings and entrance points and modern designs inside Knick's Knacks and Lamplight Lounge.

Ex. View attachment 278085

The Incredibles neighborhood represents the middle of the century boardwalks with The Incredicoaster.

The Toy Story neighborhood represents the 70s style boardwalks with grand architecture and giant structures (Jessie).
Ex.


The Pixar Neighborhood represents the 1920s Victorian Boardwalks we all love.

View attachment 278086

And the Inside Out Neighborhood represents the funky, bright colored boardwalks of the early-21st century.

Ex. View attachment 278088

So if you think about it in a way, Pixar Pier is a journey through the boardwalks of the past into the present day. It still takes you back to places in periods of time. The only thing I can't get over is the Toy Story Critter Carousel. That just seems like "oh keep the steel structure, nobody will notice with the Giant Jessie distracting them".
I think this is a bit of a stretch, particularly since Luna Park was built in 1912.
 

ixjr

Well-Known Member
I get your point, and somewhat agree, but let's be honest, Main Street isn't really any more authentic at representing a small Midwestern town than Pixar Pier is at representing an early 20th century California seaside pier. For me Main Street has always felt exactly like what it is: a very nice welcome/exit to Disneyland with adequately themed turn-of-the-century shops and restaurants.
Main Street was never intended to be an exact, antithetic recreation however. Realism is great, but Disneyland isn't about being a portrayal of the most realistic of everything. Main Street looks nothing like the typical dusty, telephone-wire-festooned roads of "real" Main Streets (including Marceline). It's about fantasy-but all great fantasy relies on a veneer of reality, which helps to "heighten" the fantasy. That's why today, Main Street "feels" less real. It used to have just enough reality that the mind could be fooled; could be lulled away to thinking that "this must be what a real Main Street 'felt' like."

Main Street has seen changes (often ones I disagree with) but when I think about it, overall, not much has changed on a holistic level. It's still supposed to represent a typical late 19th century business thoroughfare, with civic institutions and commerce, where the guest could feel one was actually taking part. It still does that pretty well, although I would argue that the removal of many of the immersive details has weakened the effect.

The point is, you're not going to get perfect theming even in a "living museum" like Colonial Williamsburg, where the "wenches" will still serve modern Sam Adams beer, and ring up your debit card. "Theme" may be imperfect, but the "Story" is easily understood. Where Main Street succeeds Pixar Pier fails, still.
 
"Theme" may be imperfect, but the "Story" is easily understood.
Pixar Pier looks like it'll be a mess story-wise primarily because it uses Pixar films as an excuse for its content instead of just being a romanticized seaside pier. Strip the Pixar elements from it and it would be roughly as historically accurate and as evocative as Main Street.

Where Main Street succeeds Pixar Pier fails, still.
I would not be a bit surprised if Disney eventually put some kind of IP overlay on Main Street someday.
 
Off topic, but relates to the IP nonsense:

TBH whenever people say "Mickey Avenue is there because the Chinese don't want to experience a turn of the century, small-town America." I'm like False. That might be a minor part of it, but then they could have put a different style Main Street, like World Bazar in Tokyo. But they decided to go with a Toontown entrance. It's just them throwing in IPs in that park, whenever they can and using "we are making this a park for the Chinese" as an excuse.

Same thing with Toy Story Land in Shanghai. It has an entire Western Village area, with shops and rides. They could have created a Grizzly Gulch style area for that park, but they had to IP-fie it and add it to Toy Story Land.
 
I would not be a bit surprised if Disney eventually put some kind of IP overlay on Main Street someday.
This IP overlay occurs nightly via fireworks and digital mapping. Main Street also has IP window display cases and IP merchandise. Halloween decorations has a distinct Disney feel during the season. This has been done before. Are you more outraged about Pixar than noticing this is nothing new?
 

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TROR

Well-Known Member
This IP overlay occurs nightly via fireworks and digital mapping. Main Street also has IP window display cases and IP merchandise. Halloween decorations has a distinct Disney feel during the season. This has been done before. Are you more outraged about Pixar than noticing this is nothing new?
Are you like an alien or something because you so consistently miss the point of what people say
 
Are you like an alien or something because you so consistently miss the point of what people say
This is a contrary viewpoint that you’re not capable of understanding. You see Disney as doing everything wrong when it’s entirely possible they are doing it correctly and consistently all along. Seems like you’re the alienated Disney fan.
 
This IP overlay occurs nightly via fireworks and digital mapping. Main Street also has IP window display cases and IP merchandise. Halloween decorations has a distinct Disney feel during the season. This has been done before. Are you more outraged about Pixar than noticing this is nothing new?
Actually what I’m arguing is that Main Street and Pixar Pier are roughly similar in that they are inconsistent in the general way they approach authenticity in their storytelling. The biggest difference between the two is that IP is being baked into PP. That said Main Street does host IP based entertainment, parades, and nighttime spectacles daily that are completely incongruous with a turn-of-the-century Midwestern town. So thanks for helping me prove my point.
 
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