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On layoffs, very bad attendance, and Iger's legacy being one of disgrace

GeekySparkles

New Member
You’re here often? You just joined! 😂😂😂

Or do you mean you‘ve been lurking? By the way there are other people here who have blogs, and have them listed in their profile. It isn’t against the rules and it isn’t a secret. So what’s your blog, might be interesting for people to know, and help drive viewers / readers there.
Yes..lurking. I've been watching for a long time and I have told many people to come over here. It's a great forum! I appreciate all your insight over here, even when people disagree with me ;)
 
How is it a “dumpster fire”?

I was a lot like you for the better part of the Iger regime. Full of optimism for the parks. And that's not a bad thing at all, in fact it's better than being cynical like some of us. However when Chapek took over I remember sitting down and crying. A full grown man crying. Why? Because I knew this was the final nail in the coffin of Walt's legacy. Whatever magic and inspiration that was left had died out.

I'd say the match that lit the dumpster fire was Frank Wells' death and Micheal Eisner going off the deep end. Here's some of the main reasons I and others view the company as a dumpster fire:

1. Rising costs with diminishing additions/enhancements to the property. Nothing has opened at any of the parks in the last few years to justify the ticket and pass increases implemented under the Bobs.

2. Disgusting upkeep of the parks. Magic Kingdom and the other Disney parks haven't looked as it should in terms of Walt's quality standards since the late 90's. Disneyland was in the worst shape in the late 90's. The monorails in WDW are a disaster.

3. Mistreatment of Annual Passholders. This is a big one. Josh D'amaro really helped fix this in Disneyland (he's really the only hope we have for the Parks). Kalogridis really ruined this at WDW. Occasional magnets, while nice, are not enough. APs are treated as an after thought due to the fact that paying guests are more profitable.

4. IPs being inserted everywhere. No need for elaboration here.

5. Disregard for the history, legacy, and classics. The Bobs simply don't care. Classics such as Splash Mountain (though I highly doubt this will actually happen), Mealstrom, Great Movie Ride and the ENTIRE EPCOT overhaul are just a few examples of complete diregard for the company's rich history.

6. Poor Business Decisions in an attempt to make Iger's legacy one of "expansion". This has gone on for YEARS under Iger and has really been debatable. There was NO reason to acquire Fox, and the acquisition ultimately ended up using TONS of money that did not need to be wasted.

There is so much to list, but I'll keep it short to this for now, as these are the main reasons.
 

UNCgolf

Well-Known Member
How is it a “dumpster fire”?

I’m not happy with a lot of choices or priorities that the company has had under the Bobs (particularly with the parks) but it’s tough for me to see it characterized in such a way. It’s more that the parks are addressed in ways that parks purists don’t like than they are run “poorly”.

That’s my problems with a lot of these types of discussions on here. They often go from a reasonable and even enlightening discussion about concerns or complaints about the parks into a huge leap about how the company as a whole is somehow poorly run or on the verge of financial ruin (without any evidence).

Not trying to pick on your post in particular just that I see it often and don’t get it

I don't think the company as a whole has been run poorly, but I think the parks have been. Maintenance levels, food quality, and so on have declined tremendously over the past couple of decades (which started with Eisner, but Iger certainly didn't do anything to fix it). Budgets have ballooned to insane levels and they still end up slashing things because they can't get them done for that gigantic price.

More importantly, (and this applies to the company as a whole to an extent) a lot of decisions have been made for short-term gain without much thought (or at least much care) for how they might affect things long-term. That's actually understandable to an extent, because their job in the current economy (for better or worse) is to maximize shareholder gains right now, not to worry about what might happen 15 years down the road when they will likely no longer be in their current jobs anyways. But it's certainly not good for parks fans who of course are concerned about what things will look like 10-15 years from now.

The company isn't on the verge of financial ruin, though. That's silly.
 

Sirwalterraleigh

Premium Member
I don't think the company as a whole has been run poorly, but I think the parks have been. Maintenance levels, food quality, and so on have declined tremendously over the past couple of decades (which started with Eisner, but Iger certainly didn't do anything to fix it). Budgets have ballooned to insane levels and they still end up slashing things because they can't get them done for that gigantic price.

More importantly, (and this applies to the company as a whole to an extent) a lot of decisions have been made for short-term gain without much thought (or at least much care) for how they might affect things long-term. That's actually understandable to an extent, because their job in the current economy (for better or worse) is to maximize shareholder gains right now, not to worry about what might happen 15 years down the road when they will likely no longer be in their current jobs anyways. But it's certainly not good for parks fans who of course are concerned about what things will look like 10-15 years from now.

The company isn't on the verge of financial ruin, though. That's silly.
Fantastic.
 

denyuntilcaught

Well-Known Member
3. Mistreatment of Annual Passholders. This is a big one. Josh D'amaro really helped fix this in Disneyland (he's really the only hope we have for the Parks). Kalogridis really ruined this at WDW. Occasional magnets, while nice, are not enough. APs are treated as an after thought due to the fact that paying guests are more profitable.

So, this is the only one I disagree with. "Magnets, while nice, are not enough." You're paying for repeated entry in the parks. Everything else is extra, IMO.

You touch on other great points though. I wouldn't say it's a dumpster fire, but the criticisms are valid.
 
Yes, but I am referring more to the fact that single day guests get treated as superior simply because they spend more money in short bursts. Passholders commit a few thousand each year while day guests spend a fraction of that. Honestly passholder treatment has declined over the course of 20 years.
 

Lilofan

Well-Known Member
I don't think the company as a whole has been run poorly, but I think the parks have been. Maintenance levels, food quality, and so on have declined tremendously over the past couple of decades (which started with Eisner, but Iger certainly didn't do anything to fix it). Budgets have ballooned to insane levels and they still end up slashing things because they can't get them done for that gigantic price.

More importantly, (and this applies to the company as a whole to an extent) a lot of decisions have been made for short-term gain without much thought (or at least much care) for how they might affect things long-term. That's actually understandable to an extent, because their job in the current economy (for better or worse) is to maximize shareholder gains right now, not to worry about what might happen 15 years down the road when they will likely no longer be in their current jobs anyways. But it's certainly not good for parks fans who of course are concerned about what things will look like 10-15 years from now.

The company isn't on the verge of financial ruin, though. That's silly.
Then why are Park execs given high accolades for their excellent leadership? ( Weiss, D'Amaro, Colglazier, Kalogridis, Ouimet, Grier, Staggs, Rasulo, Chapek, the list can go on and on. I agree with the short term gain. The lives and compensation for these execs are what can you do for me Now.
 
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Sirwalterraleigh

Premium Member
So, this is the only one I disagree with. "Magnets, while nice, are not enough." You're paying for repeated entry in the parks. Everything else is extra, IMO.

You touch on other great points though. I wouldn't say it's a dumpster fire, but the criticisms are valid.
The days of kissing customers butts in Florida are long over. It’s not coming back.

They’d love to be done with it in California too...but different audience.
 

Sirwalterraleigh

Premium Member
Then why are Park execs given high accolades for their excellent leadership? ( Weiss, D'Amaro, Colglazier, Kalogridis, Ouimet, Grier, Staggs, Rasulo, Chapek, the !its can go on and on. I agree with the short term gain. The lives and compensation for these execs are what can you do for me Now.
...because they’re lying to promote a predetermined “result”

Did the mothership just land and drop you off? 👽🤪
 

Brer Oswald

Well-Known Member
Are we sure they're not the same person?

In all seriousness, I've enjoyed Martin's posts and not sure how to find his videos. Anyone have a link?
No. Kevin has a ridiculously huge ego, and overall isn’t a very nice person. I don’t know Martin personally, not do I know anyone that does, but he definitely does not give off the same vibe.

Kevin is also a lot younger.
 

ParentsOf4

Well-Known Member
From my perspective, a significant challenge to memory and nostalgia was attraction maintenance. The details that plussed many of these attractions were lost and not experienced by later guests.

With the Universe of Energy, for example, I can recall the original sensory experience upon entering the jungle. It was dark and cold. As the sun rose, it became warmer. You could feel the warmth of the day increase with the rising of the sun. There was a morning fog and swamp smell. You were in the jungle and could feel, hear, see, and smell it. To me, this is what makes an attraction immersive.
The attraction opened with ceramic heaters in the foliage. In its first 15 years the diorama was phenomenal
When I first visited Epcot in 1983, I remember being somewhat bored by it. But I was an undergrad and perhaps I didn't fully appreciate it for what it was.

However, I also remember being most impressed by the Universe of Energy. There was something haunting (dictionary meaning of the word) in the mood it set.
 

Sirwalterraleigh

Premium Member

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