Politics OC Register - Disneyland and Universal Studios ask Newsom not to finalize theme park reopening plans just yet

This thread contains political discussion related to the original thread topic

el_super

Well-Known Member
They finally got to see the final draft of the guidelines last Thursday morning, and it completely freaked them out.

So? Every other business, industry and sector in thos state had to abide by the state guidelines, whether they disagreed with them or not. Why should Disney get preferential treatment and get to negotiate the definition of safety?
 

TP2000

Well-Known Member
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So? Every other business, industry and sector in thos state had to abide by the state guidelines, whether they disagreed with them or not. Why should Disney get preferential treatment and get to negotiate the definition of safety?

That's exactly my concern. I know for a fact (and mentioned it here a month ago, the lady who owns a half dozen salons in San Diego County) that the nail salon industry in California was getting absolutely no information and no cooperation from Sacramento for months. They had to push and plead for the ability to reopen even as Governor Newsom claimed very oddly that the first Covid case in California came from a nail salon. It finally worked, and nail salons were given a process by which they could reopen.

So what's the sticking point for the theme parks? We all know what the guidelines are for many components of a theme parks' operation; dining, shopping, transportation, live theater, museums, movie theaters, etc.

What was it about those guidelines they got to see last Thursday that made it seem more restrictive and unworkable than the already established guidelines for individual components of theme park operation; restaurants, malls, trains, movie theaters, zoos, museums, etc.?
 
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lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
No reason for tinfoil hat Dr. Hans. Your opinion is always respected. I think Disney is perpetually up to their eyeballs in B.S.
In this whole argument, I’m just not understanding the continued theory being used by the “keep theme parks closed because it’s to dangerous and we don’t know what would happen crowd,” when we have an absolute perfect trial run that we can base our facts off of in WDW and USO. It has worked and Disney has proven they can manage the situation.
Is the argument that employees in California are just dumber than the employees in Florida and couldn’t follow the protocols?
What’s the argument?
Florida is not definitive proof of anything. Despite claims by the county there has not been capacity for any meaningful surveillance. No evidence does not equal proof. There are also very different local populations. Despite being open people are not going to Florida.
 

TP2000

Well-Known Member
Florida is not definitive proof of anything. Despite claims by the county there has not been capacity for any meaningful surveillance. No evidence does not equal proof. There are also very different local populations. Despite being open people are not going to Florida.

What about Disneyland Paris as a comparison? They've reopened in Paris, even though the deaths per 100,000 French citizens is higher than California's death rate.
 

Darkbeer1

Well-Known Member
From District 6 Anaheim Councilmember Trevor O'Neil's Facebook page.

>>“Responsibly reopening amusement parks and fighting this pandemic do not need to be mutually exclusive... Tens of thousands of amusement park workers and their families, businesses surrounding amusement parks and desperate local governments are counting on the state to do both.”

Governor Newsom's actions have cost thousands of Orange County jobs and strained cities' budgets that count on tourism tax revenue.

California theme parks were ready to reopen in July, and then labor unions made a plea to the Governor and everything came to a grinding halt. There is no question in my mind that Newsom's continued posturing is absolutely a political power play over conservative Orange County.<<
 

Tamandua

Well-Known Member
From District 6 Anaheim Councilmember Trevor O'Neil's Facebook page.

>>“Responsibly reopening amusement parks and fighting this pandemic do not need to be mutually exclusive... Tens of thousands of amusement park workers and their families, businesses surrounding amusement parks and desperate local governments are counting on the state to do both.”

Governor Newsom's actions have cost thousands of Orange County jobs and strained cities' budgets that count on tourism tax revenue.

California theme parks were ready to reopen in July, and then labor unions made a plea to the Governor and everything came to a grinding halt. There is no question in my mind that Newsom's continued posturing is absolutely a political power play over conservative Orange County.<<
I'll know Disney is serious when all their social acounts start linking to the recall petition. Until then, they're holding back.
 

Dr. Hans Reinhardt

Well-Known Member
From District 6 Anaheim Councilmember Trevor O'Neil's Facebook page.

>>“Responsibly reopening amusement parks and fighting this pandemic do not need to be mutually exclusive... Tens of thousands of amusement park workers and their families, businesses surrounding amusement parks and desperate local governments are counting on the state to do both.”

Governor Newsom's actions have cost thousands of Orange County jobs and strained cities' budgets that count on tourism tax revenue.

California theme parks were ready to reopen in July, and then labor unions made a plea to the Governor and everything came to a grinding halt. There is no question in my mind that Newsom's continued posturing is absolutely a political power play over conservative Orange County.<<

Facebook. Ugh.

Remember when a couple of guests were killed over a relatively short period of time in the late 90s/early 2000s due to the park's negligence, prompting the state to issue stricter regulations on theme parks? Disneyland was opposed. Since then I have not been able fully trust that Disneyland will consistently do the right thing for the public or its workers.
 

el_super

Well-Known Member
California theme parks were ready to reopen in July, and then labor unions made a plea to the Governor and everything came to a grinding halt. There is no question in my mind that Newsom's continued posturing is absolutely a political power play over conservative Orange County.<<

Political nonsense. These people citing a concerns for the workers and employees just come across as so shallow. The employees have already spoken: they asked the governor to keep the park closed.

Newsom has nothing to gain politically by keeping Disneyland closed, unless you admit that a majority of voters support the decision.

Democracy at work.
 

Mac Tonight

Well-Known Member
Facebook. Ugh.

Remember when a couple of guests were killed over a relatively short period of time in the late 90s/early 2000s due to the park's negligence, prompting the state to issue stricter regulations on theme parks? Disneyland was opposed. Since then I have not been able fully trust that Disneyland will consistently do the right thing for the public or its workers.
I guess it’s a good job no one is forcing you to be a Disneyland fan or ever set foot in their dangerous parks anymore.
 

Tamandua

Well-Known Member
Facebook. Ugh.

Remember when a couple of guests were killed over a relatively short period of time in the late 90s/early 2000s due to the park's negligence, prompting the state to issue stricter regulations on theme parks? Disneyland was opposed. Since then I have not been able fully trust that Disneyland will consistently do the right thing for the public or its workers.
If that's your attitude, why would you ever go to a Disney park, and why spend your time here?
 

lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
Facebook. Ugh.

Remember when a couple of guests were killed over a relatively short period of time in the late 90s/early 2000s due to the park's negligence, prompting the state to issue stricter regulations on theme parks? Disneyland was opposed. Since then I have not been able fully trust that Disneyland will consistently do the right thing for the public or its workers.
IF I am remembering correctly, one of the issues with Equity performers at Walt Disney World has been backstage space. Proper space for distancing shouldn’t have to be a demand.
 

TP2000

Well-Known Member

"Initial draft guidelines from the state reportedly call for reopening individual California theme parks at 25% capacity once their county reaches the least-restrictive 'minimal' risk level and limiting attendance to residents who live within 120 miles of each park."


Ah ha! There they are! And I can see why they were so shocking and unacceptable to the theme parks, especially the big ones like Disneyland and Universal Studios. It appears that of the various scenarios we were guessing at, the two big roadblocks are;
  • Theme Park can't reopen until the county it's in reaches the Yellow Tier.
  • Theme Park can't allow anyone in who lives more than 120 miles away.
So only Southern Californians can get into Disneyland. Santa Barbara is 121 miles away, so it's out, but folks in Montecito could get in. Bakersfield is 137 miles from Disneyland, so they're out for Disneyland but could get in to Universal Studios. San Diegans could get in to Disneyland and Knott's, but not Universal Studios. Palm Springs gets in to all SoCal parks except Six Flags. Etc., etc.

Then there's the whole mythical Yellow Tier status, that no county with more humans than coyotes will ever be able to reach. At least not in 2021. Maybe by 2022?

But getting Orange County down to the Yellow Tier most definitely can't happen in 2020. So Disneyland is closed until sometime in '21, meaning it's entirely possible the Disneyland closure would extend past March, 2021 and stretch into a second year.

No wonder the theme park industry group freaked out, and no wonder Disney's senior executives have been so publicly dismissive of Governor Newsom's plans and committees thus far. No wonder Bob Iger quit Newsom's worthless business roundtable group. This is basically Sacramento telling California theme parks to stay closed for a full year, then reopen at only 25% capacity and only let in the locals.

What an absolute nightmare. It's almost as if Sacramento doesn't want theme parks in California any more. Why?
 
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TP2000

Well-Known Member
IF I am remembering correctly, one of the issues with Equity performers at Walt Disney World has been backstage space. Proper space for distancing shouldn’t have to be a demand.

I just got back from Trader Joe's. It was bustling with customers and employees. The employees were working shoulder to shoulder with the customers, moving out of the way when I needed to get into the dairy case, handing a lady a box of cereal from the top shelf, etc., etc.

There are things you can do to minimize risk in the workplace, but at some point someone is just going to have to walk past you in the hall or get their sweater out of the locker next to yours. If it's good enough for the employees at Trader Joe's, it should be good enough for the kids playing Cinderella in the park.

But honestly, now that we know the guidelines California is demanding of theme parks, the question is moot. There won't be any theme parks open in California for a long time if these are actually the guidelines.
 
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Dr. Hans Reinhardt

Well-Known Member
If that's your attitude, why would you ever go to a Disney park, and why spend your time here?

Can one not admire something and have a point of view that isn't exactly aligned with the thing they admire? By the way I'm not a frequent Disneyland guest - my last trip to a Disney theme park was in 2015. I had planned to visit DLR in March, but Covid said no.
 

TP2000

Well-Known Member
Can one not admire something and have a point of view that isn't exactly aligned with the thing they admire? By the way I'm not a frequent Disneyland guest - my last trip to a Disney theme park was in 2015. I had planned to visit DLR in March, but Covid said no.

I agree with you that Disneyland lost credibility during the horrific visitor deaths of 1998-2003. And they have yet to gain that credibility back; it's going to take at least another decade of flawless operation I think.

(Two dead at Sailing Ship Columbia 1998, one dead at Roger Rabbit 2000, one dead at Big Thunder Mountain 2003)

That said, the guidelines that Sacramento wants for theme parks just seem... impossible. No tourists allowed? 25% capacity only if your county gets to the Yellow Tier? Heck, Hans, you can't even go to Disneyland because you live in Northern California. And I couldn't go to Great America because I live in SoCal. And @Curious Constance can't go to any California park because she lives in Oregon. Not that it matters because the Yellow Tier is nearly impossible to get to anyway.

The entire business model of California's major theme parks just collapsed with those rules.

Why even bother trying to reopen a California theme park? California theme parks might as well just sell their property to apartment developers and focus on their company's other parks in Florida, Japan and the Midwest.
 
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BuzzedPotatoHead89

Well-Known Member
While some of what’s been proposed is far more aggressive than I'm sure was ideal for Disney and company, the “yellow” tier requirement really strikes as the main “die on the sword” issue here for theme park operators.

Waiting until a county has been in “Orange” tier/status for a minimum 21 days and then allowing the County health department of jurisdiction to have final say to permit/approve the opening (under the states original guidelines for yellow) makes sense as a compromise. Just open the park tickets as a “reservation only validity period” with proof of residency required. Require maxpass as a way to reduce indoor queues.

Then if all goes well, when finally in yellow Disney could argue that they could extend the zip code radius and maybe “grandfather” in some of the out of area annual passes, too.
 

Mac Tonight

Well-Known Member
Can one not admire something and have a point of view that isn't exactly aligned with the thing they admire? By the way I'm not a frequent Disneyland guest - my last trip to a Disney theme park was in 2015. I had planned to visit DLR in March, but Covid said no.
You and I have butt heads in the past, but you have my respect. Hell, I even stopped to take a picture of the Dr. Hans Reinhardt costume at the 2019 D23 expo for you.

For as glib as I’ve been of late, I miss the old days of this forum. After awhile, the endless back and forth Covid talk is just filling empty space and no longer enjoyable. I think our conversations would be much more genial if we were strictly talking about elements within the park itself (except SWL).
 

TP2000

Well-Known Member
While some of what’s been proposed is far more aggressive than I'm sure was ideal for Disney and company, the “yellow” tier requirement really strikes as the main “die on the sword” issue here for theme park operators.

The Yellow Tier thing is likely the worst part of it operationally for them. It's nearly impossible to get to, especially for the three SoCal counties with theme parks that have between 3.2 Million to 10 Million people in each county.

Yellow Tier for Covid is like expecting LA County to only have two car crashes per day and Orange County can only have one car crash per day; it's just never going to happen.

Even then, to use Governor Newsom's favorite word, a county can "toggle" between Tiers very easily. Like this week Modoc County (Population 8,775) is in the Yellow Tier but is now headed back to the Orange Tier next Tuesday because it had a single Covid case reported.

The Yellow Tier requirement would seem to be the worst part of this plan operationally. The requirement that theme parks can't allow in any tourists or out-of-towners is a nightmare from a marketing and PR perspective, but more achievable than waiting for a county of millions of people to reach the Yellow Tier.
 

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