News Coronavirus and Walt Disney World general discussion

flynnibus

Premium Member
The number of people that have heart attacks a day at Disney are probably less than zero. It definitely happens, but it’s not something Disney is having to constantly adjust their operations for. (And when someone DOES have a heart attack, you better believe Disney helps the families out with magical moments and refunds and whatnot. I’ve seen it happen many times).

I guarantee you more than one person is going to test positive for a fever per day. Whether it’s from Covid-19, some other illness, a sunburn, or someone who just happens to run hot normally. Do you honestly think it’s going to make good business sense for them to turn away dozens of families every single day for something that may or may not even be an illness, let alone a contagious one?
That is a different discussion entirely. It is immaterial to the suggestion that Disney should or would be liable to pay for all their expenses they voluntarily undertook to make a vacation because ultimately they are unable to visit the parks how they wanted.

And then denying them Disney transportation back to their hotel? Or does he transportation back to the airport? And then when the airplanes don’t allow them on the plane because of the fever? When this happens to dozens of families a day, do you honestly think this isn’t going to cause some sort of uproar?
How do you get from worrying about a DIsney bus to justifying they should be compensated for their time off work, airline costs, etc? That's where your 'what if..' completely falls apart and has no standing. Disney isn't going to dump you on the side of World Drive... but they aren't going to be paying people back for their vacation time, etc because they got sick on their own. This is rediculous hyper extrapolation stuff that has zero standing.

And again, what happens when that family proves they weren’t positive for Covid-19? That they just had a sunburn, or their baby was teething, or they just run hot naturally, or they just had a random fever not really related to anything serious? You honestly think they’re just gonna suck up the loss and accept that Disney denied them for no valid reason? You honestly think Morgan & Morgan wouldn’t have a field day with all these people wrongfully turned away?
Then people are free to try to challenge Disney... and spend their money trying. "public safety" and putting thousands at risk is going to be a pretty freaking tall barrier to climb if Disney's screening methods are the acceptable methods from the medical experts.

how many people have heart attacks on Disney property a day? Yes, it happens, but it’s probably one a day or less. (Btw, they go above and beyond for families of those who have heart attacks on property - I’ve seen it, first-hand.) How many people have temperatures over 98.6? I guarantee you it’s going to be far more than 1 a day. It’s going to be dozens, easily.
How many are in this potential has nothing to do with Disney's liability on people's personal voluntary costs outside of Disney.

Everything you are saying has merit... somewhere else... That doesn't mean it's support or reasoning to justify your postulate. These are largely points about 'is it viable for Disney to do this...' -- nothing to do with what Disney would be liable for.

Your line of thinking would say you should get free airline tickets if you were denied entry to the parks due to crowds... but the crowds weren't REALLY dangerous. Sorry... That's not how any of this works.
 

UNCgolf

Well-Known Member
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And again, what happens when that family proves they weren’t positive for Covid-19? That they just had a sunburn, or their baby was teething, or they just run hot naturally, or they just had a random fever not really related to anything serious? You honestly think they’re just gonna suck up the loss and accept that Disney denied them for no valid reason? You honestly think Morgan & Morgan wouldn’t have a field day with all these people wrongfully turned away?
As I said above, Disney likely doesn't require any reason to turn you away. That lawsuit would be a waste of time and money, especially if they refund your ticket.

I also did do a quick check, and as I suspected, Disney reserves the right to refuse entry to anyone under their sole and absolute discretion.
 

eliza61nyc

Well-Known Member
Is there any evidence that higher temperatures will kill the virus?
so let's remember that there isn't a lot of evidence on this specific virus because we're just getting started but there are a couple of research theories believing that the virus is vulnerable to higher temperatures.

1) evidently its a very "weak" virus, the outer cell wall is easily destroyed which is why hand washing is so effective.
2) is related to the SARS virus which has been proven to be vulnerable to higher temperatures
3) like the flu we just seem to see a decrease in cases during the summer. maybe it's because we're outdoors more.

I know University of Penn is doing research on temperature and the virus.

https://www.nbc4i.com/news/u-s-world/myth-busted-does-heat-kill-the-coronavirus/ doesn't really say much but it is being looked at

 
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lilypgirl

Well-Known Member
It’s not helping New Orleans right now, but I guess if those people were infected weeks ago it wasn’t as hot then. It would be great if the heat really helped, but we don’t have the science to back that up yet.
Living there I would hardly call low 80’s hot plus the temp drops at night. I don’t know if heat does help but several doctors have mentioned it to include Dr. Fucci . He specifically mentioned heat and humidity. So I was just wonder if constant 90 degree days with warm nights would make these percussions necessary or not.
 

rowrbazzle

Well-Known Member
Disney almost certainly reserves the right to refuse entry to anyone for any reason as part of the terms and conditions of having a ticket. I haven't specifically checked to see if that's the case, but I'd be absolutely shocked if they don't.

It's a private business. As long as they aren't discriminating against a legally protected class across the board, then they have absolutely no obligation to let you into the parks. Someone could try to sue them, but they'd be almost guaranteed to lose.
In effect, they'd be discrimating based on medical conditions. That's not generally permissible. Typically companies need a job-related reason to make employees submit to a medical exam. Not sure where customers fit in to those protections.

I'm trying to think of situations where individuals are required to undergo medical exams to engage in commerce. Aside from insurance, I'm coming up blank.
 

Clyde Birdbrain

Unknown Member
Premium Member
So my question is if the heat does in fact kill the virus and makes it unable to move why would any of these measures even be needed in the extremely hot months of June, July, August and Sept.?
If that is true then there are still a lot of cold inside places with air conditioning where the virus could spread more freely.

Unless they turn off all the air conditioning. 😅
 

scorp16

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
No
Not sure if this has been shared before. If it has, apologies.

 

peter11435

Well-Known Member
In effect, they'd be discrimating based on medical conditions. That's not generally permissible. Typically companies need a job-related reason to make employees submit to a medical exam. Not sure where customers fit in to those protections.

I'm trying to think of situations where individuals are required to undergo medical exams to engage in commerce. Aside from insurance, I'm coming up blank.
Boarding a cruise. If a guest reports being ill or recently being ill they are subject to further examination by the ship nurse/doctor before being allowed to board.
 

durangojim

Well-Known Member
I'm in favor of Disney doing whatever they think is necessary to keep their guests as safe and healthy as possible. This will be controversial but I think if they decide to limit the amount of guests at the park they should restrict the guests to people staying on site and AP holders initially. I'm in favor them taking temperatures or anything else, but I think they need to inform the guests when the reservations are made and through mass communications to the Passholders. That's why I'm suggesting these two groups initially. AP holders are typically engaged and people who are staying on site are a captive audience that would have plenty of opportunities to be informed that they may not be let in if certain criteria are or are not met.
 

UNCgolf

Well-Known Member
In effect, they'd be discrimating based on medical conditions. That's not generally permissible. Typically companies need a job-related reason to make employees submit to a medical exam. Not sure where customers fit in to those protections.

I'm trying to think of situations where individuals are required to undergo medical exams to engage in commerce. Aside from insurance, I'm coming up blank.
That's not really the case. You're thinking of the Americans with Disabilities Act, which doesn't allow employers to discriminate against otherwise qualified individuals specifically because of a medical condition.

It's been a long time since I did anything with the ADA (aka since I was in law school), but I don't believe that that carries over to customers. Beyond that, I'm not aware of any time a contagious illness was considered a medical condition for purposes of a disability classification.

Private businesses are generally allowed to refuse service to anyone as long as the reason for refusal isn't one that falls into a protected class. I'm struggling to think of a way a contagious illness alone would fall into a protected class. For example, if a black person was refused entry because they had a fever and a white person was not, then there would be a racially based discrimination claim (and race is a protected class). If everyone with a fever was refused entry, though, that's likely permissible.
 

Lilofan

Well-Known Member
In effect, they'd be discrimating based on medical conditions. That's not generally permissible. Typically companies need a job-related reason to make employees submit to a medical exam. Not sure where customers fit in to those protections.

I'm trying to think of situations where individuals are required to undergo medical exams to engage in commerce. Aside from insurance, I'm coming up blank.
A guest made a stink on camera but one of the Disney cruise ships denied entry to a female guest that tried to board to start her family cruise that was pregnancy related but I think rules regarding pregnancy are stated in the ticket.
 

durangojim

Well-Known Member
Boarding a cruise. If a guest reports being ill or recently being ill they are subject to further examination by the ship nurse/doctor before being allowed to board.
Unfortunately with the volume of guests at WDW and the current inability to have quick reliable testing for COVID, even an exam by a doctor would not be sufficient.
 

TheDisneyDaysOfOurLives

Well-Known Member
No. But temperature checks followed by a 15 minute test for those who fail is not out of the realm of possibility eventually.
It's not out of the realm of possibility, but what is Disney doing with that data? Are they collecting it and recording it? There's areas here where Disney has to be careful because once they start collecting that data, they have to protect that data and I don't think Disney wants to get into the area of keeping and maintaining medical records.
 

scorp16

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
No
No. But temperature checks followed by a 15 minute test for those who fail is not out of the realm of possibility eventually.
It goes deeper than that (depending on how they in fact choose to test). In the cruise line scenario. They could be tested prior to boarding. The ship has to clear customs in every port of call it stops in. So in theory they could be tested again as a prerequisite before being permitted to debark. They also may be subject to be tested before rejoining the ship.

With Disney, what does that do to multiple parks. You check in and get tested. Then get to the MK early afternoon and get tested again. Then park hop to Epcot early evening and get tested again. Then dip out of International Gateway for a meal at Yachtsman for another test. And then go back in through IG.

It's crazy, even if they could do it. Not to say that they won't
 

peter11435

Well-Known Member
It's not out of the realm of possibility, but what is Disney doing with that data? Are they collecting it and recording it? There's areas here where Disney has to be careful because once they start collecting that data, they have to protect that data and I don't think Disney wants to get into the area of keeping and maintaining medical records.
It likely wouldn’t be ‘Disney’ doing the testing.
 
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