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News Coronado Springs Expansion - Gran Destino Tower

Missing20K

Well-Known Member
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Again - my comments refer to the Gran Destino hotel itself, and not the issue of a lack of an overarching theme for the entire resort.
The cookie-cutter exterior leaves a lot to be desired, but I don't believe for a second that Disney would construct a building that looks like it is melting in the hot Florida Sun. Not even something as subtle as this:
View attachment 388928
My comments also only referred to the Tower. Any mention of the surrounding resort is because the tower is in conflict with it due to design decisions or lack thereof.

Agree that DIS wouldn't build something like that stateside.
 

note2001

Well-Known Member
I admit that I'm confused as to how you and others aren't seeing it, because it seems obvious to me. A couple of examples:
The ironwork as an architectural. element is Gaudí -inspired. The eyes in the middle, are Dalí .
View attachment 388887View attachment 388890View attachment 388894
The lattice in the Dahlia lounge has the bell-shaped dancer from the short at the 2:30 mark, as well as more eye shapes.
View attachment 388901
I'm not saying there aren't tiny touches from the film in the resort (if you can call those eyes tiny, LOL) but that the touches are too mathematical.

If Imagineering was given free reign I'm sure they would have come up with designs that echoed of Dali's influence and transformed before our eyes with lighting. Imagine that lattice work morphing from what it is, to the flock of birds flying, to casting shadows of the bell/woman on the ground as the directions and reflections change. An upgrade could still be done to make it so, but Disney almost never goes back to resorts once built and improves upon design. Last time I saw that happen it was to put covered walkways out to the bus stops at Kidani.

For the record: I love the interior.
 

MisterPenguin

Rumormonger
Premium Member
I'm not saying there aren't tiny touches from the film in the resort (if you can call those eyes tiny, LOL) but that the touches are too mathematical.

If Imagineering was given free reign I'm sure they would have come up with designs that echoed of Dali's influence and transformed before our eyes with lighting. Imagine that lattice work morphing from what it is, to the flock of birds flying, to casting shadows of the bell/woman on the ground as the directions and reflections change. An upgrade could still be done to make it so, but Disney almost never goes back to resorts once built and improves upon design. Last time I saw that happen it was to put covered walkways out to the bus stops at Kidani.

For the record: I love the interior.
The artists in us certainly would have liked to have seen Disney push the boundaries and have a tower facade that looked like it was melting and other Daliesque touches.

But I don't think the conventioneers would have been into that. This tower was made for the high-roller conventioneer. Subtle touches and grand non-threatening architectural elements was the best compromise one would expect.
 

lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
Again - my comments refer to the Gran Destino hotel itself, and not the issue of a lack of an overarching theme for the entire resort.
The cookie-cutter exterior leaves a lot to be desired, but I don't believe for a second that Disney would construct a building that looks like it is melting in the hot Florida sun. Not even something as subtle as this:
View attachment 388928
Why couldn’t Disney do something simple like this if the story is so important? It could all be done as carved stucco. Even on the interior, filleting the corners would go a long way towards reducing the stark contrast.
 

SorcererMC

Well-Known Member
Why couldn’t Disney do something simple like this if the story is so important? It could all be done as carved stucco. Even on the interior, filleting the corners would go a long way towards reducing the stark contrast.
Ruling out a materials or time issue, too risky in a market that loves minimalism in hotel design. Call me cynical but I don't think the consumer market would respond favorably to it, to look like somewhere they would want to stay.

And might seem too 'out of place', increasing the obvious differences between the existing resort and the new building.
(Didn't they re-paint some? I haven't seen it.)
 

Missing20K

Well-Known Member
Why couldn’t Disney do something simple like this if the story is so important? It could all be done as carved stucco. Even on the interior, filleting the corners would go a long way towards reducing the stark contrast.
Cause story isn't that important?

Or at least story that costs significant capital outlay without a foreseeable ROI, isn't that important?

Though, there is quite a bit of stucco in FL, so one would think they could have found the necessary contractors to create such items at a reasonable expense.

Could have also just texture painted custom fypon details and that would have given it a more sculptural look.
 

Sam4D23

Well-Known Member
In terms of theming and story telling this resort could be a lot better. It's still a very nice and very beautiful hotel it just clashes with the Disney tradition. All I can simply hope for is that Disney went with a more watered down approach to appease conventioneers.

In other words, I hope the buck stops here as far as Disney building resorts with lazy theming. I won't hold my breath, but I'll hope. Disney can and should do better. Disney should never settle for 'just okay' and 'nice enough', it should always push beyond that because pushing the boundaries of what we expect or think we want is what has always made Disney 'Disney'.

For those of you who love this new resort, great. I'm glad that you're pleased with the final product. Please just understand that some other fans are as disappointed as you are pleased. What I think we can all agree on is that we expect Disney to deliver high-quality facilities and experiences.
 

MisterPenguin

Rumormonger
Premium Member
"The starting point for the project was to celebrate Spanish, Mexican and South American cultures, including food, music, colors, design and textiles," said David Stofcik, executive architect at Walt Disney Imagineering.
“As we started getting into it, especially from the Spanish side, we discovered an amazing collaboration that Disney had with Salvador Dali from Spain. And we really started to look into that from a graphic scenic kind of standpoint, colors,” Stofcik said.*

Hmmm... like some sort of Contempofusion Hispania motif...


*
 

note2001

Well-Known Member
The artists in us certainly would have liked to have seen Disney push the boundaries and have a tower facade that looked like it was melting and other Daliesque touches.

But I don't think the conventioneers would have been into that. This tower was made for the high-roller conventioneer. Subtle touches and grand non-threatening architectural elements was the best compromise one would expect.
I have a new life goal: build a beautiful melting house. Might be hard to keep the furniture in place though. 🤣
 

voodoo321

Well-Known Member
Is there really a Disney Imagineering department anymore? in any meaningful sense? These project designs are outsourced, as are things like Tron coaster. There just can't possibly be a team of Imagineers that are given any sort of creative decision making power anymore. The ones that are left sold their souls a long time ago. I'm not chastising them for it. They have no choice. It's the way the company operates now.
 

lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
Ruling out a materials or time issue, too risky in a market that loves minimalism in hotel design. Call me cynical but I don't think the consumer market would respond favorably to it, to look like somewhere they would want to stay.

And might seem too 'out of place', increasing the obvious differences between the existing resort and the new building.
(Didn't they re-paint some? I haven't seen it.)
What issue of materials? The tower is already stucco. If the market doesn’t like the concept, then develop a new concept. According to this thread, convention goers are an odd lot who demand their buildings to be regular, uniform and the same but also demand unique furniture and finishings.

Though, there is quite a bit of stucco in FL, so one would think they could have found the necessary contractors to create such items at a reasonable expense.
Nassal just built a moss covered Gothic ruin out of stucco. There are no bricks on Duff Gardens or the new Sesame Street, all hand carved stucco. Some of the guys who do brick carving even do it completely free hand. I imagine some curves would be something they could handle.
 

SorcererMC

Well-Known Member
What issue of materials? The tower is already stucco. If the market doesn’t like the concept, then develop a new concept. According to this thread, convention goers are an odd lot who demand their buildings to be regular, uniform and the same but also demand unique furniture and finishings.
The pic I posted was for stonework, which isn't something I would expect Disney to replicate for a hotel. I imagine that doing it right would be labor-intensive. Maybe for a boutique-style hotel (like SW), but I wouldn't expect it at this scale. As for as the interior design goes - this is an on-trend example, via AD:
388999

Someone tell me again how the Gran Destino lobby isn't 'Disney' enough, because I think that with its bold patterns and colors, it's the Disney version of this. Consumers don't want something 'in your face' or over-the-top. IMO despite the fact that it's Dali (who was larger than life), and Disney, it doesn't need to be.

Re: consumer markets. Business travelers are increasingly leisure travelers, too. WDW fits the bill for that as a vacation destination, when it might otherwise be considered just a 'family destination'. IMO this hotel would entice people (eg without kids or with older kids) to stay on-property at Disney who otherwise wouldn't. As for luxury travelers, if they want to see contoured architecture like Gaudi, they are just going to go to Spain...
(Disney probably could price these rooms higher given the novelty, but they aren't because that's not the market they want.)
 
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TJ Vazquez

Well-Known Member
Is there really a Disney Imagineering department anymore? in any meaningful sense? These project designs are outsourced, as are things like Tron coaster. There just can't possibly be a team of Imagineers that are given any sort of creative decision making power anymore. The ones that are left sold their souls a long time ago. I'm not chastising them for it. They have no choice. It's the way the company operates now.
TRON hate continues in this thread too I see..
 

voodoo321

Well-Known Member
The pic I posted was for stonework, which isn't something I would expect Disney to replicate for a hotel. I imagine that doing it right would be labor-intensive. Maybe for a boutique-style hotel (like SW), but I wouldn't expect it at this scale. As for as the interior design goes - this is an on-trend example, via AD:
View attachment 388999

Someone tell me again how the Gran Destino lobby isn't 'Disney' enough, because I think that with its bold patterns and colors, it's the Disney version of this. Consumers don't want something 'in your face' or over-the-top. IMO despite the fact that it's Dali (who was larger than life), and Disney, it doesn't need to be.

Re: consumer markets. Business travelers are increasingly leisure travelers, too. WDW fits the bill for that as a vacation destination, when it might otherwise be considered just a 'family destination'. IMO this hotel would entice people (eg without kids or with older kids) to stay on-property at Disney who otherwise wouldn't. As for luxury travelers, if they want to see contoured architecture like Gaudi, they are just going to go to Spain...
(Disney probably could price these rooms higher given the novelty, but they aren't because that's not the market they want.)
No
 
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