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Politics 28000 Layoffs coming to Disney's domestic theme parks - statement from Josh D'Amaro

This thread contains political discussion related to the original thread topic

UNCgolf

Well-Known Member
Creative professionals are typically exempt, provided the minimum weekly salary threshold is achieved.

That was my point.

I'm just not sure that all of Disney's entertainment cast would qualify (some of them almost certainly would) because I don't know what positions they consider entertainment.
 

crispy

Well-Known Member
I think the problem is that Disney now has a rep as a company that wants to provide a pricey experience on the cheap. It's not so much the layoffs themselves--obviously there will be cuts when business is this badly affected--it's that this is a service-oriented business and you have to show ticket buyers that they're getting an experience that they can't get cheaper somewhere else. Yet it's assumed that Disney is going to try to keep the corona level of service AFTER they get back up to higher levels of attendance.

Put another way--If people can't see Mickey or Minnie or the princesses even when corona is "over," then why should they go all the way to Disney World when it's easier to just go to the beach/a cabin/a local theme park? (Or, if you're heading down to Florida anyway... why not pick Universal?)
Disney has been this way for years which is why we haven't visited in a while. I still have a soft spot for Disney (thus posting on this thread), but I can't in good conscience support them financially. I feel really bad for the laid off employees, but this was an inevitable end. The pandemic just sped up the process. As fans, we want magic, but as a business, they want leanness and efficiency. Those things don't coexist well especially when you have to answer to shareholders. I don't necessarily blame Disney for laying off employees during a pandemic...so has most every other company. I do blame them for allowing Iger to sacrifice the company's reputation and well-being at the altar of his ego. The pandemic made things worse, but the chickens were coming home to roost at some point.

As someone who once loved Disney, it kinda hurts to realize that a company doesn't love you back. As a customer, I was a walking wallet and nothing more. Employees are seen as commodities, not people. I quit going to WDW when I realized I was giving more than I was getting. It hasn't been worth the price of admission for me in a long time. Disney way of doing things in recent years is to charge more for less. People have made Disney magic, not overpriced cupcakes or dessert parties, but people cost money while cupcakes make money. That's all that matters. Disney lost the balance between maximizing profits and offering superior service a long time ago, but they have been able to outrun it.

I truly feel terrible for the employees who have lost their jobs and have had some friends affected. It is awful for all of them because so many have poured their lives into the company.
 
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natatomic

Well-Known Member
When I was part-time, I often worked more than 40 hours a week. However, you can’t just say, “hey, I worked full-time hours this week, give me benefits!” You have to work more than X number of hours (I believe it is 32 for Disney, if memory serves correctly) consistently over a period of time. I think you have to average full-time hours for 6 whole months. And Disney keeps track. If you reach that threshold, you are immediately “capped,” and you are not allowed to work more than 31 hours per week for a certain period of time. Enough time that you’re no longer in danger of averaging full-time hours.
(That’s a rough explanation anyway)
 

ImperfectPixie

Well-Known Member
When I was part-time, I often worked more than 40 hours a week. However, you can’t just say, “hey, I worked full-time hours this week, give me benefits!” You have to work more than X number of hours (I believe it is 32 for Disney, if memory serves correctly) consistently over a period of time. I think you have to average full-time hours for 6 whole months. And Disney keeps track. If you reach that threshold, you are immediately “capped,” and you are not allowed to work more than 31 hours per week for a certain period of time. Enough time that you’re no longer in danger of averaging full-time hours.
(That’s a rough explanation anyway)
I hate that practice.
 

GeneralKnowledge

Well-Known Member
When I was part-time, I often worked more than 40 hours a week. However, you can’t just say, “hey, I worked full-time hours this week, give me benefits!” You have to work more than X number of hours (I believe it is 32 for Disney, if memory serves correctly) consistently over a period of time. I think you have to average full-time hours for 6 whole months. And Disney keeps track. If you reach that threshold, you are immediately “capped,” and you are not allowed to work more than 31 hours per week for a certain period of time. Enough time that you’re no longer in danger of averaging full-time hours.
(That’s a rough explanation anyway)
They also play games with people’s jobs being designated as “temporary assignments” that just seem to be magically renewed every so often.
 

etc98

Active Member
Chapeks salary is $10mil that equates to 400 cast members making $25K/year.

Igers salary was $48mil that equates to 1920 making $25K/year.

If you total up all the executive salaries you don’t even make it 1/4 of the CM laid off.

BTW if you think DLR staying closed is a scapegoat, what should they do? Continue to pay everyone as if nothing is wrong? TWDC is hemorrhaging. If you’re naive enough to think it’s sustainable you’re in fantasy land.
The point is they can afford to restore executive pay to the tune of tens of millions of dollars, money that the executives do not need to survive by the way, but they can’t afford to pay their cast members, who absolutely do need that money to live. If they’re hemorrhaging, then they should have cut executive pay first, and then laid off cast after.

You said it yourself. If just Iger and Chapek didn’t take a salary this year, almost 2000 cast members might still have a job. But instead, those cast members have to worry about unemployment, and possibly being evicted or going hungry because the Bob’s wanted to buy third homes.

It’s because just like everything else about our economy right now, it’s set up so the rich get richer and the poor get poorer.
 

rowrbazzle

Well-Known Member
"Some loopholes"? FLSA is pretty clear what constitutes overtime for non-exempt employees. Also pretty clear what a non-exempt (hourly) and exempt (salaried) employee is.
Those classifications are more complicated and still open to interpretation. And the minimum pay for an exempt employee was very low ($23,600) until this year. As far as I know Amazon is still facing a class-action lawsuit over this issue.
 

Lilofan

Well-Known Member
They also play games with people’s jobs being designated as “temporary assignments” that just seem to be magically renewed every so often.
Many companies are on the same bandwagon. They call it outsourcing the work to outside companies. When job or project is finished, it's not the companies responsibility to keep those workers on the payroll anymore.
 

wannabeBelle

Well-Known Member
The point is they can afford to restore executive pay to the tune of tens of millions of dollars, money that the executives do not need to survive by the way, but they can’t afford to pay their cast members, who absolutely do need that money to live. If they’re hemorrhaging, then they should have cut executive pay first, and then laid off cast after.
I'm not even being that philanthropic honestly. I just know that when I go to the Parks, I dont plan on seeing or interacting with either of the Bobs, Josh, etc. al. I do plan on seeing the CM at the restaurant where I am dining, I know I plan on seeing musical acts and streetmosphere with multiple CM's, I know that I will be interacting with the CM's who make sure I am seated and strapped in properly on the rides. Im sure there are others but you get the idea. If you make cuts and they are in the areas that affect the guest experience, the quality of that experience will decline. I understand cuts can be made that WON'T affect the experience and in California due to the Parks being closed there is no job to return to. Florida is a different situation. While we shouldn't just employ people for the sake of employing them, the parks should not be the first place to be cut, as that is where your revenue now and in the future is coming from. Cut the experience and people will not be as anxious to come because the experience is not what they expect. Marie
 

natatomic

Well-Known Member
They also play games with people’s jobs being designated as “temporary assignments” that just seem to be magically renewed every so often.
Those are one that people choose to do and usually have to apply for. Not something people are forced to do. (Aside from temporary relocations like the workers at a closed water park, for example. But those are typically only for a month or two.)
 

TrainChasers

Well-Known Member
When I was part-time, I often worked more than 40 hours a week. However, you can’t just say, “hey, I worked full-time hours this week, give me benefits!” You have to work more than X number of hours (I believe it is 32 for Disney, if memory serves correctly) consistently over a period of time. I think you have to average full-time hours for 6 whole months. And Disney keeps track. If you reach that threshold, you are immediately “capped,” and you are not allowed to work more than 31 hours per week for a certain period of time. Enough time that you’re no longer in danger of averaging full-time hours.
(That’s a rough explanation anyway)
Yes.. this. Lol.
 

Riverrafter21

Well-Known Member
Here are my reasons against Old Fashioneds: If I want a Fanta (which I don't), I'll order a Fanta.
I get it, people can get heavy handed with the syrup while making an OF. Especially if they giving you the Don Draper version where they're practically adding a cherry kool-aid packet.

I think the bourbon is better enhanced in the Old Fashioned
 

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