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News Tron coaster coming to the Magic Kingdom

MickeyMario

Well-Known Member
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Projects would have a better chance of approval if spending was not ridiculously out of control.
The GotG coaster has a ridiculous budget, according to out insiders, and it got approved.

The point is, blaming Imagineers for what projects do and don't get approved shows a complete misunderstanding of how Disney works
 

lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
The GotG coaster has a ridiculous budget, according to out insiders, and it got approved.

The point is, blaming Imagineers for what projects do and don't get approved shows a complete misunderstanding of how Disney works
You’re taking one point of the process and ignoring the larger context. Walt Disney Imagineering is very much to blame because they cannot get projects done for a reasonable amount of money. Project Sausalito doesn’t disprove that. It’s very much part of a larger pattern of withholding investment as long as possible and then focusing on large marquee projects. Small projects like more frequently updating a simple ride don’t make sense because the Imagineers are unable to do so for a reasonable amount of money.
 

MansionButler84

Well-Known Member
You’re taking one point of the process and ignoring the larger context. Walt Disney Imagineering is very much to blame because they cannot get projects done for a reasonable amount of money. Project Sausalito doesn’t disprove that. It’s very much part of a larger pattern of withholding investment as long as possible and then focusing on large marquee projects. Small projects like more frequently updating a simple ride don’t make sense because the Imagineers are unable to do so for a reasonable amount of money.
Exactly. And more acutely the budget cuts that we bemoan are a direct result of WDIs inability to control costs.
 
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MickeyMario

Well-Known Member
You’re taking one point of the process and ignoring the larger context. Walt Disney Imagineering is very much to blame because they cannot get projects done for a reasonable amount of money. Project Sausalito doesn’t disprove that. It’s very much part of a larger pattern of withholding investment as long as possible and then focusing on large marquee projects. Small projects like more frequently updating a simple ride don’t make sense because the Imagineers are unable to do so for a reasonable amount of money.
So executives' decisions to spend billions on MDE, DVCs and misplaced attractions that don't expand park capacity (and in some cases actively decrease it), disregard park and land theming, while also refusing to do basic upkeep of older attractions and effects that haven't worked in years, it's all Imagineers faults?

That's funny, because these same Imagineers work on the Tokyo parks, and their parks don't have any of these problems.
 

lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
So executives' decisions to spend billions on MDE, DVCs and misplaced attractions that don't expand park capacity (and in some cases actively decrease it), disregard park and land theming, while also refusing to do basic upkeep of older attractions and effects that haven't worked in years, it's all Imagineers faults?

That's funny, because these same Imagineers work on the Tokyo parks, and their parks don't have any of these problems.
It’s not the sole problem, but it most definitely plays a large role. The Pressler model and micromanaging specifically came out of controlling costs and would be less justified if such massive sums were not involved. Every new attraction is a larger cost, representing a greater risk that has to be more of a sure thing so that it can meet ever rising performance expectations. Tokyo has also very much seen a lack of investment and a change to just repeating the same few franchises. Tokyo DisneySEA is getting a Fantasyland with water poured all over it so that it has a shallow water connection to the park.
 

Bocabear

Well-Known Member
It’s not the sole problem, but it most definitely plays a large role. The Pressler model and micromanaging specifically came out of controlling costs and would be less justified if such massive sums were not involved. Every new attraction is a larger cost, representing a greater risk that has to be more of a sure thing so that it can meet ever rising performance expectations. Tokyo has also very much seen a lack of investment and a change to just repeating the same few franchises. Tokyo DisneySEA is getting a Fantasyland with water poured all over it so that it has a shallow water connection to the park.
I keep wondering where the risk is? They have theme parks that continue to perform even with non working effects and multiple shuttered attractions...the guest numbers climb any time they do anything new no matter how lame...almost anything including a cupcake party can be seen as a success... so exactly where is the risk? If they do anything it is going to be successful in some way. I don't believe risk plays any role...It's just a lack of willingness to invest back into the parks instead of stock buybacks and upper tier executive bonuses.
 

lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
I keep wondering where the risk is? They have theme parks that continue to perform even with non working effects and multiple shuttered attractions...the guest numbers climb any time they do anything new no matter how lame...almost anything including a cupcake party can be seen as a success... so exactly where is the risk? If they do anything it is going to be successful in some way. I don't believe risk plays any role...It's just a lack of willingness to invest back into the parks instead of stock buybacks and upper tier executive bonuses.
We are talking about an organization that went into an all out panic last fall because they were forecasting a dip in quarterly bookings and attendance. It’s all a risk because leadership doesn’t understand why theme parks work as a business, why people go to them in the first place. They’ve been convinced that it does require spending but Walt Disney Imagineering has completely squandered that change.
 

MickeyMouse10

Well-Known Member
Ooooo yeah, those are some nice tracks you're laying down Disney. Go a little to the left a bit. Oh yeah... right there. That's good. Do it a little faster. YES, YES.... YESSSS, OHHHH DON'T STOP. You know where to put that track. Yes you do.
 

GlacierGlacier

Well-Known Member
It’s not being installed all that fast. Steel coasters are a kit of parts and they routinely go up in a matter of months.
Yeah, it's not fast in regards to coaster construction.

People have been staring at a mound of dirt with a bunch of holes in it for months now (me included, on the edge of my seat for construction) and seeing recognizable shapes fly over the horizon at a much more visible construction pace is very, very satisfying.
 

tparris

Well-Known Member
Yeah, it's not fast in regards to coaster construction.

People have been staring at a mound of dirt with a bunch of holes in it for months now (me included, on the edge of my seat for construction) and seeing recognizable shapes fly over the horizon at a much more visible construction pace is very, very satisfying.
It is very nice to see this happen at this pace after it being just a pile of dirt for a year.
 
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