News Tiana's Bayou Adventure - latest details and construction progress

Homemade Imagineering

Well-Known Member
I’m kind of surprised they decided to install the frog statues without paint, you’d think they’d want to complete figure finishing and hold off on installing something exposed to the elements until a handful of weeks before opening. I’d imagine they’re waiting until just before opening to paint em anyways, as it’d be pointless to retouch something guests aren’t seeing rn. On a side note, I would assume most of the attention is being shifted to the queue as I’d imagine it’s the most incomplete section. The interior is likely finished with all the testing going on, although by now I am sure it’s all about reconfiguring show elements to synchronize the vehicles. One thing I am curious about is whether they’ll begin testing exterior attraction audio during park hours
 

zipadee999

Well-Known Member
I’m kind of surprised they decided to install the frog statues without paint, you’d think they’d want to complete figure finishing and hold off on installing something exposed to the elements until a handful of weeks before opening. I’d imagine they’re waiting until just before opening to paint em anyways, as it’d be pointless to retouch something guests aren’t seeing rn. On a side note, I would assume most of the attention is being shifted to the queue as I’d imagine it’s the most incomplete section. The interior is likely finished with all the testing going on, although by now I am sure it’s all about reconfiguring show elements to synchronize the vehicles. One thing I am curious about is whether they’ll begin testing exterior attraction audio during park hours
For the audio, I wonder if they’ll keep the 3-song structure from Splash. The ride system was designed for it where each song coincides with a drop
 

FerretAfros

Well-Known Member
View attachment 769949

What is going on here? The reason for the colors is obvious, but what for? The bottom of some sort of small pool in the queue? Given the blue border, I'm assuming this is the final arrangement. Is it going to be glued into place and be a ceiling feature? I've no idea.
If I had to guess, it’s probably going to be exposed glass aggregate that will be embedded in the concrete pavement. Looking at the way this is set up, these appear to be panels that will be cast face down (so the colors can be arranged before the concrete is poured), and then once the panels have cured, they can be flipped over, moved into place, and surrounded by cast-in-place concrete to surround it.

Glass can be used to add a little bit of color and/or sparkle to otherwise-traditional concrete. It’s very durable and will hold up well to the constant traffic of a theme park. The concrete itself can be dyed or stained any number of colors to further accent the area (given the dark glass colors shown, I would guess something lighter, maybe yellow to fit the Mardi Gras color scheme).

While not super common, they’ve used this technique in the parks before for accents here and there. Here’s a photo of something similar in front of Mission:Space:
1708802305524.jpeg


I’m not sure that the aesthetic of this technique lends itself to either historic New Orleans or a rustic swamp, but I suppose it could be used as an accent in areas where they want people to pay a little more attention to their exact location, like at a FP touch point or queue entry under the attraction marquee.
 

SilentWindODoom

Well-Known Member
If I had to guess, it’s probably going to be exposed glass aggregate that will be embedded in the concrete pavement. Looking at the way this is set up, these appear to be panels that will be cast face down (so the colors can be arranged before the concrete is poured), and then once the panels have cured, they can be flipped over, moved into place, and surrounded by cast-in-place concrete to surround it.

Glass can be used to add a little bit of color and/or sparkle to otherwise-traditional concrete. It’s very durable and will hold up well to the constant traffic of a theme park. The concrete itself can be dyed or stained any number of colors to further accent the area (given the dark glass colors shown, I would guess something lighter, maybe yellow to fit the Mardi Gras color scheme).

While not super common, they’ve used this technique in the parks before for accents here and there. Here’s a photo of something similar in front of Mission:Space:
View attachment 770093

I’m not sure that the aesthetic of this technique lends itself to either historic New Orleans or a rustic swamp, but I suppose it could be used as an accent in areas where they want people to pay a little more attention to their exact location, like at a FP touch point or queue entry under the attraction marquee.

That seems to be it. The material around the circumference looked far too flimsy for permanent construction, especially if water were involved, but as a concrete form to be pulled away afterward... it just makes perfect sense.

While the buildings are historic and rustic, they're being repurposed and we've seen what was done with the old building that became Tiana's Place. Perhaps the center of the mill entrance if that's redone? Or it could just be at a major junction or such.
 

TheEPCOTHistorian

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
Yes
I wish WDI would stop trying to fit modern and contemporary design into attractions that take place in eras which wouldn’t have featured these installations.

It’s a commonly recurring situation that continuously leaves me puzzled. You’re going through the trouble of fully immersing me Iin an employee owned food co-op in 1920’s New Orleans, yet presenting the space with numerous features that take design queues from… the later 1900’s. Yeah. That makes sense.
 

peter11435

Well-Known Member
I wish WDI would stop trying to fit modern and contemporary design into attractions that take place in eras which wouldn’t have featured these installations.

It’s a commonly recurring situation that continuously leaves me puzzled. You’re going through the trouble of fully immersing me Iin an employee owned food co-op in 1920’s New Orleans, yet presenting the space with numerous features that take design queues from… the later 1900’s. Yeah. That makes sense.
Are you referring to the unfinished concrete forms?
 

bmr1591

Well-Known Member
That waterfall has a low setting that they would switch to either in the colder months or whenever a boat halted there for more than a few seconds. It doesn't really get people wet at that setting, and i'm fine with it remaining in such a case.

I'm more curious whether they've removed the soakers that would drench the boats between the first and second lifts. Those I hope they leave off, or again switch them permanently to the low setting they would often set them to so they don't reach the boats. I haven't spotted any of the pipes in any of the construction photos yet, though getting angles of them is tricky.

They should do what Japan does and have a line to get really wet in that has it spray a lot.
 

EPCOT-O.G.

Well-Known Member
I wish WDI would stop trying to fit modern and contemporary design into attractions that take place in eras which wouldn’t have featured these installations.

It’s a commonly recurring situation that continuously leaves me puzzled. You’re going through the trouble of fully immersing me Iin an employee owned food co-op in 1920’s New Orleans, yet presenting the space with numerous features that take design queues from… the later 1900’s. Yeah. That makes sense.

Are you referring to the unfinished concrete forms?
I don’t want to speak for him/her, but probably talking about stuff like this

1708865956438.png
 

Nubs70

Well-Known Member
From on operations standpoint, ideally you have at least enough logs/boats to ensure that there is always another one ready to enter load assuming a perfect dispatch every single time.

Using an imaginary version of Splash/Tiana's as in example, the ride loads 3 logs at a time and has a ride time of 12 minutes. Another assumption is under idea circumstances it takes 1 minute from the 3 logs entering the load/unload to leave the area. Finally lets assume they stagger the 3 log releases every 20 seconds to spread out the course
So after 12 minutes we need all 3 original logs back ready to meet the load/unload station

Time of where Log 1 isWhere is log 3 into the ride?How many logs have left unload ideally
00 mins3
1 min40 seconds6
2 mins1 min, 40 seconds9
Break
12 mins and 40 seconds12 minutes (Ready to enter load42
Now as boats 43,44,45 leave the station in 20 seconds boats 1,2,and 3 are ready to take their place. (Boat 4 will bump right into 3 as it's taken into the unload station in 20 seconds)

However, if the ride misses even 1 of the ideal 60 second dispatch times, boats 43,44,45 are waiting to enter the loading area still, so 1-3 will bump in behind them. If it misses more and more, the back up gets bigger and bigger

So ideally this ride have 45 logs on it, but to be safe, however, most people would probably add at least 6 more incase a calculation or 2 is off.
This why 3 load stations, in my view, is a design flaw. They should have gone with 2 parallel load stations.
 

zipadee999

Well-Known Member
If only they took the opportunity to build an indoor queue. The SM queue was brutal in the summer. Pretty much the only E ticket off the top of my head with most of it outdoors.
For some reason they just copied the Disneyland queue which already had a compact design to fit into Critter Country, and then used all of the additional courtyard space at MK just for a bunch of outdoor bullpens. Tokyo really got lucky, I think their’s is all indoors if I’m not mistaken
 

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