News Tiana's Bayou Adventure - latest details and construction progress

SpectreJordan

Well-Known Member
Man, that post about the ride's backstory is something else. How bland & non-exciting.

After reading it, something donned on me about this ride. Why isn't the plot something about Tiana & friends going out west to find ingredients or to build a new restaurant? The adventure writes itself there & then you can have an actual mountain.
 

Trauma

Well-Known Member
and when it opens and the crowds are huge because everyone wants to see it and what replaced a popular attraction, they’ll claim success and everyone involved will be rewarded with bonuses and you can guarantee it’ll be in the media as well to push their message regardless of the backlash that occurs from true fans
How did that work out for Galactic Starcruiser ?
 

nor'easter

Well-Known Member
Man, that post about the ride's backstory is something else. How bland & non-exciting.

After reading it, something donned on me about this ride. Why isn't the plot something about Tiana & friends going out west to find ingredients or to build a new restaurant? The adventure writes itself there & then you can have an actual mountain.
The Disney "imagineers" who came up with this ride description are an absolute travesty. Who gives a fig about that convoluted backstory screed? Maybe someone should remind them that they are developing a ride in a theme park, not a sociology paper.
 

MrPromey

Well-Known Member
Are they forgetting this story is for a log ride? It's hilarious how deep they're trying to make this.

Agreed.

Mk is not the place for that.

Save The Deep stuff for The Living Seas and maybe for an eventual Amazon Prime spinoff series.

I've seen that ride drained plenty of times and there can't be even three feet of water under those boats for most of it.
 

SplashLanta

Well-Known Member
...........Disney has truly lost all of their "CREATIVE" talents..... Haven't they?

Can you imagine ANY of these people coming up with an attraction like the original Imagination? Or something as grand as Spaceship Earth? Haunted Mansion? Heck...... Even Countdown to Extinction????

Triple yikes.

This is no longer the same company it once was... We all knew that... But it has never been so blatantly in our face such as this...
No, Imagineering still has immense creative talent, as evidenced by modern gems like Rise of the Resistance and Shanghai pirates.

The issue with modern Imagineering is there are too many chefs in the kitchen and not a firm grasp on a collective direction coinciding with an inflated sense of universal importance, and you get a jumbled attraction preaching nonsense down your throat.

Riding a ride about an employee-owned co-op staffed by underpaid employees and exploited college students will undoubtedly be a highlight.
 

celluloid

Well-Known Member
No, Imagineering still has immense creative talent, as evidenced by modern gems like Rise of the Resistance and Shanghai pirates.

The issue with modern Imagineering is there are too many chefs in the kitchen and not a firm grasp on a collective direction coinciding with an inflated sense of universal importance, and you get a jumbled attraction preaching nonsense down your throat.

Riding a ride about an employee-owned co-op staffed by underpaid employees and exploited college students will undoubtedly be a highlight.

This is true for sure, although a bit of column A and B. Many that helped with Rise and such have since retired. A lot of the old guard that were a part of things up until Shanghai finally left or retired. Shanghai's pirates was designed nearly a decade ago.

Rise of the Resistance was a lot of Scott Trowbridge and what he had originally planned for a Daily Planet ride for DC Island before Marvel was pushed for IOA.

The sensibilities are a lot gone, and the ones who are left as you say, have very little influence or trust because synergy is more important than creating something great in the medium first. Hence it being based on a series that has not even premiered yet.

And to bring it back to construction, we see this in the walls. The story of the series is being told, not necessarily the attraction.
 

_caleb

Well-Known Member
I think this overly-detailed, "convoluted" backstory is typical for most thoughtfully-designed themed attractions. The main difference here is that they're sharing it with the public like this so early in the process. Someone upthread shared the backstory document for Pandora, and it was similarly filled with details and in-world jargon while being short on narrative or emotional connections.

Based on other things we've seen, I don't think the document represents the storyline of the Tiana's Bayou Adventure. The ride seems like it will have a cute critters, a fun party story, and, well, some sort of adventure. The backstory might be better understood as a framework the actual stories of the ride, restaurants, and shops should fit into.

In the parks, they are retheming the mountain. They want to sell hot sauce and beignets, have a restaurant, a kitchen/cooking/baking shop (Eudora's), offer cooking classes, sell gardening/homesteading merch, brand all these things as being under the ownership of Tiana, and tie it into the Disney+ series and its characters.

This backstory document can serve to unify all these efforts in time/place/story. WDI teams are gathering props and sourcing materials and beginning to build out TBA, and this document can help provide context for things like blueprints, checklists, and plans.

It also seems clear to me that Disney is trying to nurture the fandom by sharing things like the "Beyond Thunder Mountain" blue sky presentation at last years' D23 and documents like this backstory. The goal of releasing this was probably to get us talking about the ride, to signal what's coming, and to appeal to those of us who like to be in on the process as it's happening. I could be wrong, but I don't think the document was designed to be a press release or a summery of the ride.
 

EPCOT-O.G.

Well-Known Member
I think this overly-detailed, "convoluted" backstory is typical for most thoughtfully-designed themed attractions. The main difference here is that they're sharing it with the public like this so early in the process. Someone upthread shared the backstory document for Pandora, and it was similarly filled with details and in-world jargon while being short on narrative or emotional connections.

Based on other things we've seen, I don't think the document represents the storyline of the Tiana's Bayou Adventure. The ride seems like it will have a cute critters, a fun party story, and, well, some sort of adventure. The backstory might be better understood as a framework the actual stories of the ride, restaurants, and shops should fit into.

In the parks, they are retheming the mountain. They want to sell hot sauce and beignets, have a restaurant, a kitchen/cooking/baking shop (Eudora's), offer cooking classes, sell gardening/homesteading merch, brand all these things as being under the ownership of Tiana, and tie it into the Disney+ series and its characters.

This backstory document can serve to unify all these efforts in time/place/story. WDI teams are gathering props and sourcing materials and beginning to build out TBA, and this document can help provide context for things like blueprints, checklists, and plans.

It also seems clear to me that Disney is trying to nurture the fandom by sharing things like the "Beyond Thunder Mountain" blue sky presentation at last years' D23 and documents like this backstory. The goal of releasing this was probably to get us talking about the ride, to signal what's coming, and to appeal to those of us who like to be in on the process as it's happening. I could be wrong, but I don't think the document was designed to be a press release or a summery of the ride.
If you do much more heavy lifting for Disney I’m calling OSHA
 

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