The Integration of Fox into the Disney Corporate Family: Parks, Movies, IPs, Studios

Disney Irish

Well-Known Member
I agree. This makes me feel like prequels are the direction Marvel Studios wants to go after the success of Captain America: TFA and Captain Marvel. I wonder who the main hero of the MCU WWI film will be. Anyone got any ideas? I bet it'll be an Invaders film with Namor and Union Jack. Except Captain America and Bucky aren't a part of it.
Namor as I understand it is still tied up in contracts with other parties (albeit not Universal it appears), so I doubt we'll see a Namor appearance in Phase 4.

Union Jack already made an appearance in First Avenger as one of the Howling Commandos, so likely not him unless its a prequel to the prequel. But it could be a Freedom's Five movie, with Orson Randall's Iron Fist (predecessor to Danny Rand from the TV show) instead of Union Jack.
 

brodie999

Active Member
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Namor as I understand it is still tied up in contracts with other parties (albeit not Universal it appears), so I doubt we'll see a Namor appearance in Phase 4.

Union Jack already made an appearance in First Avenger as one of the Howling Commandos, so likely not him unless its a prequel to the prequel. But it could be a Freedom's Five movie, with Orson Randall's Iron Fist (predecessor to Danny Rand from the TV show) instead of Union Jack.
Having a Freedom's Five film with Orson Randall's Iron Fist is a great idea because it can act as prequel to Marvel's Iron Fist and officially connect the Netflix shows to the MCU. It can further explain the history of Kung-Lun and fully show it for the first time.
 

Disney Irish

Well-Known Member
Having a Freedom's Five film with Orson Randall's Iron Fist is a great idea because it can act as prequel to Marvel's Iron Fist and officially connect the Netflix shows to the MCU. It can further explain the history of Kung-Lun and fully show it for the first time.
Technically they are already set in the MCU, albeit just because they say so and not because of actual story connections.

This is not really the place to discuss this as it should be in a movies forum under a Marvel thread. Continued over there....
 

bartholomr4

Well-Known Member
From the Wall Street Journal (For those who believe Disney will attempt to purchase the Spiderverse from Sony)
Don’t Count on a Hollywood Showdown at Sony

By Jacky Wong

April 9, 2019 6:25 a.m. ET

Activist investor Daniel Loeb seems to be taking aim at Sony SNE 8.20% for the second time in six years. He failed to rally support for a spinoff of movie and music assets in 2013, and he may fail again.

Shares in the Japanese company jumped 9% Tuesday after Reuters reported that Third Point, Mr. Loeb’s $14 billion New York-based hedge fund, is building a stake to push for changes, including the sale of assets. The fund has tried this before: It amassed as much as 7% of Sony in 2013, after a weak couple of years for the stock, and asked it to spin off its entertainment business. The company rejected the proposal and Third Point sold its stake in 2014, its defeat sweetened by a nearly 20% profit.

This time, Mr. Loeb’s move may be similarly opportunistic. Sony has lost around a quarter of its value in the past six months due to slowing sales of its PlayStation consoles. The activist investor may also have been emboldened by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s corporate-governance reforms: Third Point won a rare boardroom fight at Tokyo-based Seven & i Holdings , the owner of 7-Eleven, in 2016.

Sony has lost around a quarter of its value in the past six months due to slowing sales of its PlayStation consoles. But the battle with Sony will be tougher. It will likely revolve once again around Sony’s entertainment assets. The value of quality content has ballooned with the popularity of video and music streaming. Disney last month completed its acquisition of the entertainment assets of 21st Century Fox for $71.3 billion after a bidding war with Comcast .

The assets at stake include one of the five big Los Angeles movie studios and one of the world’s top three music labels. If they were for sale, they would likely attract the likes of Amazon.com or Netflix. Brokerage house Jefferies estimated the value of Sony’s movie and music assets at around $35 billion, equal to about 60% of its total market value, in a research note last week. Selling or spinning off those assets would provide a short-term boost but at the expense of long-term growth potential.

Sony’s biggest pushback against the activist investor is that it managed to deliver superb returns—its shares have more than tripled in the past six years—by not succumbing to Third Point’s demands in 2013. It did take some of Mr. Loeb’s advice, such as selling the unprofitable personal-computer business, but Sony largely stayed its course, transforming the old Walkman maker into an entertainment company. Movies, music and games now account for more than half of operating profit, versus 24% in 2013.
Mr. Loeb is unlikely to end up losing his shirt on Sony, particularly given his timing. But investors hoping for a Hollywood showdown could end up disappointed.
 

brodie999

Active Member
From the Wall Street Journal (For those who believe Disney will attempt to purchase the Spiderverse from Sony)
Don’t Count on a Hollywood Showdown at Sony

By Jacky Wong

April 9, 2019 6:25 a.m. ET

Activist investor Daniel Loeb seems to be taking aim at Sony SNE 8.20% for the second time in six years. He failed to rally support for a spinoff of movie and music assets in 2013, and he may fail again.

Shares in the Japanese company jumped 9% Tuesday after Reuters reported that Third Point, Mr. Loeb’s $14 billion New York-based hedge fund, is building a stake to push for changes, including the sale of assets. The fund has tried this before: It amassed as much as 7% of Sony in 2013, after a weak couple of years for the stock, and asked it to spin off its entertainment business. The company rejected the proposal and Third Point sold its stake in 2014, its defeat sweetened by a nearly 20% profit.

This time, Mr. Loeb’s move may be similarly opportunistic. Sony has lost around a quarter of its value in the past six months due to slowing sales of its PlayStation consoles. The activist investor may also have been emboldened by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s corporate-governance reforms: Third Point won a rare boardroom fight at Tokyo-based Seven & i Holdings , the owner of 7-Eleven, in 2016.

Sony has lost around a quarter of its value in the past six months due to slowing sales of its PlayStation consoles. But the battle with Sony will be tougher. It will likely revolve once again around Sony’s entertainment assets. The value of quality content has ballooned with the popularity of video and music streaming. Disney last month completed its acquisition of the entertainment assets of 21st Century Fox for $71.3 billion after a bidding war with Comcast .

The assets at stake include one of the five big Los Angeles movie studios and one of the world’s top three music labels. If they were for sale, they would likely attract the likes of Amazon.com or Netflix. Brokerage house Jefferies estimated the value of Sony’s movie and music assets at around $35 billion, equal to about 60% of its total market value, in a research note last week. Selling or spinning off those assets would provide a short-term boost but at the expense of long-term growth potential.

Sony’s biggest pushback against the activist investor is that it managed to deliver superb returns—its shares have more than tripled in the past six years—by not succumbing to Third Point’s demands in 2013. It did take some of Mr. Loeb’s advice, such as selling the unprofitable personal-computer business, but Sony largely stayed its course, transforming the old Walkman maker into an entertainment company. Movies, music and games now account for more than half of operating profit, versus 24% in 2013.
Mr. Loeb is unlikely to end up losing his shirt on Sony, particularly given his timing. But investors hoping for a Hollywood showdown could end up disappointed.
I hope Disney wins in buying Sony because Amazon's interest fizzled out and Apple is most unlikely to show a lot of interest in buying them as well. So Marvel will eventually win their battle to get Spider-Man and all of his supporting cast back.
 

Cesar R M

Well-Known Member
From the Wall Street Journal (For those who believe Disney will attempt to purchase the Spiderverse from Sony)
Don’t Count on a Hollywood Showdown at Sony

By Jacky Wong

April 9, 2019 6:25 a.m. ET

Activist investor Daniel Loeb seems to be taking aim at Sony SNE 8.20% for the second time in six years. He failed to rally support for a spinoff of movie and music assets in 2013, and he may fail again.

Shares in the Japanese company jumped 9% Tuesday after Reuters reported that Third Point, Mr. Loeb’s $14 billion New York-based hedge fund, is building a stake to push for changes, including the sale of assets. The fund has tried this before: It amassed as much as 7% of Sony in 2013, after a weak couple of years for the stock, and asked it to spin off its entertainment business. The company rejected the proposal and Third Point sold its stake in 2014, its defeat sweetened by a nearly 20% profit.

This time, Mr. Loeb’s move may be similarly opportunistic. Sony has lost around a quarter of its value in the past six months due to slowing sales of its PlayStation consoles. The activist investor may also have been emboldened by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s corporate-governance reforms: Third Point won a rare boardroom fight at Tokyo-based Seven & i Holdings , the owner of 7-Eleven, in 2016.

Sony has lost around a quarter of its value in the past six months due to slowing sales of its PlayStation consoles. But the battle with Sony will be tougher. It will likely revolve once again around Sony’s entertainment assets. The value of quality content has ballooned with the popularity of video and music streaming. Disney last month completed its acquisition of the entertainment assets of 21st Century Fox for $71.3 billion after a bidding war with Comcast .

The assets at stake include one of the five big Los Angeles movie studios and one of the world’s top three music labels. If they were for sale, they would likely attract the likes of Amazon.com or Netflix. Brokerage house Jefferies estimated the value of Sony’s movie and music assets at around $35 billion, equal to about 60% of its total market value, in a research note last week. Selling or spinning off those assets would provide a short-term boost but at the expense of long-term growth potential.

Sony’s biggest pushback against the activist investor is that it managed to deliver superb returns—its shares have more than tripled in the past six years—by not succumbing to Third Point’s demands in 2013. It did take some of Mr. Loeb’s advice, such as selling the unprofitable personal-computer business, but Sony largely stayed its course, transforming the old Walkman maker into an entertainment company. Movies, music and games now account for more than half of operating profit, versus 24% in 2013.
Mr. Loeb is unlikely to end up losing his shirt on Sony, particularly given his timing. But investors hoping for a Hollywood showdown could end up disappointed.
I find this a bit weird regarding the spinoff..
Considering.. they didnt get some Disney staff to boost Sony animation studios?
 

bartholomr4

Well-Known Member
I find this a bit weird regarding the spinoff..
Considering.. they didnt get some Disney staff to boost Sony animation studios?
I agree! The investment by a hedge fund is interesting because it may force their hand..... Without that investment, I don't think there is any movement to divest any assets, especially one as valuable as Spiderman
 

Slpy3270

Well-Known Member
It appears Disney has completed its sale of its A&E Networks UK stake to co-owner Hearst. From Infodigital Germany:

The History Channel (Germany) GmbH & Co. KG, organizer of nationwide pay-TV programs History and A & E, is wholly owned by The Hearst Corporation. This was announced by the Commission on Concentration in Media (CEC) on 10 April.
The Company has been indirectly a joint venture of The Walt Disney Company, Inc. and The Hearst Corporation through its parent, A & E Television Networks LLC ("AETN").
The Hearst Corporation's acquisition of Disney's stake in AETN is related to the acquisition of Twenty-First Century Fox, Inc. by The Walt Disney Company, Inc. As part of the European Commission's review of the proposed merger plan Disney is required to divest its (indirect) interests in AETN activities in Germany, the United Kingdom, Italy and Spain. At CEC, this process is currently pending, it was said.
The US media group Hearst includes magazines (including Cosmopolitan, Elle, Marie Claire and Men's Health) as well as daily and weekly newspapers and local TV stations in the United States. Among the most important participations are the transmitter networks A & E, History, Lifetime and ESPN. In Germany Hearst operates together with the Burda Group the joint venture Burda Hearst Publishing GmbH, which publishes the German titles of the ELLE brand and the magazine Harper's BAZAAR.
The Hearst Corporation is in the trust of the Hearst family. The licensing Landesmedienanstalt for the program History is the Bavarian State Center for New Media (BLM), for the program A & E the Niedersächsische Landesmedienanstalt (NLM).

Note that this specific news only pertains to History Channel Germany, but one has to think the stake sale will be announced imminently to coincide with this.
 

seascape

Well-Known Member
I agree! The investment by a hedge fund is interesting because it may force their hand..... Without that investment, I don't think there is any movement to divest any assets, especially one as valuable as Spiderman
I would like Disney and Apple to go after Sony Pictures with Disney getting all the Marvel Property and Apple getting everything else. That would get approval from country.
 

Slpy3270

Well-Known Member
Sony Pictures is a worthless dumpster fire aside from the Spider-Man movies. It suffered a huge hack nearly five years ago that exposed all of their employees' (and many celebs') personal info, trade secrets, embarrassing emails and unreleased movies. Since then most of their movies have been critical and/or commercial flops, and two of their movies have won the Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Picture in a row.

And that's not even getting into perhaps the studio's worst aspect: Tom Rothman, Sony's movie studio head. He's a complete egotist who wants a hand in everything that comes to his desk, and he is the reason the X-Men and Fantastic Four were thoroughly screwed over in film while he was at Fox (from Brett Ratner directing X-Men: The Last Stand, to Deadpool getting his mouth sewn shut in X-Men Origins: Wolverine, as well as greenlighting Fant4Stic before he left). The only reason anybody would want to buy the studio is if they're willing to put up with Rothman's crap, because he's not just going to go away if the studio gets new owners (even worse, he could just look for another job at a top studio, including Disney, which he would almost certainly run to the ground).
 

lee.moles.disney

Well-Known Member
I don’t get why there’s even a discussion really about Sony. Disney seem happy with their deal with SONY and in a few films time, the MCU may be happy enough to move on from the character.

As said, SONYs movie studio is a pile of crap. Don’t think they even have IP like James Bond anymore do they?
 

Slpy3270

Well-Known Member
I don’t get why there’s even a discussion really about Sony. Disney seem happy with their deal with SONY and in a few films time, the MCU may be happy enough to move on from the character.

As said, SONYs movie studio is a pile of crap. Don’t think they even have IP like James Bond anymore do they?
I think it has to do with the fact that fans are ****ed off with Sony doing everything they can to milk Spider-Man for all its worth without caring about the quality of said output. It's the same complaint they had with Fox's management of Fantastic Four. Hell, some fans are still convinced that the Fox deal was only about the Marvel characters and nothing more.

As the for the latter, yep. MGM and Universal are sharing the franchise now.
 

lee.moles.disney

Well-Known Member
I think it has to do with the fact that fans are ****ed off with Sony doing everything they can to milk Spider-Man for all its worth without caring about the quality of said output. It's the same complaint they had with Fox's management of Fantastic Four. Hell, some fans are still convinced that the Fox deal was only about the Marvel characters and nothing more.

As the for the latter, yep. MGM and Universal are sharing the franchise now.
Yeah I kinda get that. I'm in the camp of trying to mop up the Marvel theme parks rights from Comcast long term rather than pointless things like Sony
 
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