News Splash Mountain retheme to Princess and the Frog - Tiana's Bayou Adventure

MickeyMouse10

Well-Known Member
Splash too didn’t much belong—Georgia is hardly the frontier.

"America's Wild Frontier. Today, the old west to most of us means the southwestern states where cowboys roamed the range. In Georgia the “frontier” was a demarcation between the civilized settlements of the east, and the land considered wilderness beyond that."

Georgia was considered Frontier in the 1700's through 1800's. So it seems to fit pretty well.
 

LittleBuford

Well-Known Member
"America's Wild Frontier. Today, the old west to most of us means the southwestern states where cowboys roamed the range. In Georgia the “frontier” was a demarcation between the civilized settlements of the east, and the land considered wilderness beyond that."

Georgia was considered Frontier in the 1700's through 1800's. So it seems to fit pretty well.
I’m not American, so I’ll have to defer to those who are, but I’m surprised by the claim that the nineteenth-century “Old South” is popularly considered to be the frontier. Do others here agree?
 

MisterPenguin

President of Animal Kingdom
Premium Member
"America's Wild Frontier. Today, the old west to most of us means the southwestern states where cowboys roamed the range. In Georgia the “frontier” was a demarcation between the civilized settlements of the east, and the land considered wilderness beyond that."

Georgia was considered Frontier in the 1700's through 1800's. So it seems to fit pretty well.
Did Georgia look like "the frontier" in Gone with the Wind which was in the mid 1800s?

By 1820s-30s, steamships were up and down the Mississippi and St. Louis was being gentrified.
 

AdventureHasAName

Well-Known Member
I’m not American, so I’ll have to defer to those who are, but I’m surprised by the claim that the nineteenth-century “Old South” is popularly considered to be the frontier. Do others here agree?
Typically, the frontier would be understood to be everything west of the Mississippi River. Although, those in New England (where I grew up), do tend to view things as "us" and "everywhere else" and lump the south (and the midwest) in with the remainder of the country west of the Mississippi River.
 

MickeyMouse10

Well-Known Member
I’m not American, so I’ll have to defer to those who are, but I’m surprised by the claim that the nineteenth-century “Old South” is popularly considered to be the frontier. Do others here agree?
Did Georgia look like "the frontier" in Gone with the Wind which was in the mid 1800s?

By 1820s-30s, steamships were up and down the Mississippi and St. Louis was being gentrified.

Alaska is still called "The Last Frontier", so I see no reason why parts of Georgia wouldn't have been in the 1800's.
 

BrerFoxesBayouAdventure

Well-Known Member
Country Bear is doing just fine without a known IP. Just like....

Big Thunder Railroad
Haunted Mansion
Space Mountain
Pirates (was)
Jungle Cruise (was)
Enchanted Tiki
It's a Small World
Tron (movies stink and failed at the box office)
Journey into Imagination
Test Track
Soarin
Tower of Terror (very old show)
Rock n Rollercoaster
Expedition Everest
and Splash Mountain before it kicked the bucket. I'd add in Mr. Toad's Wild Ride as that film faded from public consciousness.
 

AdventureHasAName

Well-Known Member
I was being a bit cheeky and obliquely responding to the “Tiana doesn’t belong in Frontierland!” criticisms. Though to be fair, 1920s Louisiana is no more the frontier than 1860s Georgia.
Well, that's just it ... the "frontier" was the unexplored and unsettled portion of the United States west of the Mississippi River at the time the Louisiana Purchase was made. The key word being "unsettled." At the time the United States acquired New Orleans in 1803, the city had already been in existence (under the control of France and Spain) for 80+ years; it was hardly unsettled. Contrast this with the next major city to the west, Houston, that wasn't settled until the 1830s. In the southern part of the US, New Orleans served as the last great city before the frontier as the settlers and cowboy culture (popularized in Frontierland) moved west and tamed the remainder of the country.
 

LittleBuford

Well-Known Member
Well, that's just it ... the "frontier" was the unexplored and unsettled portion of the United States west of the Mississippi River at the time the Louisiana Purchase was made. The key word being "unsettled." At the time the United States acquired New Orleans in 1803, the city had already been in existence (under the control of France and Spain) for 80+ years; it was hardly unsettled. Contrast this with the next major city to the west, Houston, that wasn't settled until the 1830s. In the southern part of the US, New Orleans served as the last great city before the frontier as the settlers and cowboy culture (popularized in Frontierland) moved west and tamed the remainder of the country.
I think it's important to note that the lands you describe as "unsettled" already had populations before they were "tamed".
 

Disney Analyst

Well-Known Member
But not just any basket—one filled with goodies!

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I discovered they were called Hampers (instead of gift basket) in the UK just this Christmas, as we sent one to my partners Brother and girlfriend, as they currently live in London on the 2 year visa.
 

LittleBuford

Well-Known Member
I discovered they were called Hampers (instead of gift basket) in the UK just this Christmas, as we sent one to my partners Brother and girlfriend, as they currently live in London on the 2 year visa.
I usually avoid terminology that is so specifically British as to be unintelligible to others, so I'm glad to know that I should add "hamper" to the list, where it will join "trolley" for "shopping cart" and "jumper" for "sweater".
 

AdventureHasAName

Well-Known Member
I usually avoid terminology that is so specifically British as to be unintelligible to others, so I'm glad to know that I should add "hamper" to the list, where it will join "trolley" for "shopping cart" and "jumper" for "sweater".
In the United States, a hamper is a basket where people place their clothes after they've been worn, as they await being laundered.
 

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