Spirited News, Observations & Thoughts Tres

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unkadug

Follower of "Saget"The Cult
I foresee a new restriction on roller coasters becoming effective soon along with the height restriction.

For safety reasons
all riders with a body mass index of over 28
cannot ride under any circumstances.

Do you think the ACLU will object to this?
 

the.dreamfinder

Well-Known Member
I foresee a new restriction on roller coasters becoming effective soon along with the height restriction.

For safety reasons
all riders with a body mass index of over 28
cannot ride under any circumstances.

Do you think the ACLU will object to this?
B&M and others have a fat and height friendly rows already in their coasters, they just need to enforce that.

I think you meant the folks who fight for fat equality.
God forbid we address the reason why most of these folks are obese.
 

The Empress Lilly

Well-Known Member
hershey-park-weight-restrictions.jpg
 

JenniferS

Bears. Beets. Battlestar Galactica.
Premium Member
B&M and others have a fat and height friendly rows already in their coasters, they just need to enforce that.

I think you meant the folks who fight for fat equality.
God forbid we address the reason why most of these folks are obese.
At 6' 8", my husband is unable to fit on a number of rides - coasters especially - which suits him just fine.
 

PhotoDave219

Well-Known Member
That sound about right. You get into some physics a long the way as well, once the mass has acceleration in a negative G you end up with more force heading out of the cart with a reduced cross section to hold you in. LOL. Sorry this is just getting ridiculous with the obese people.

So.... In layman's terms.... The FUPA popped over the restraint & the rest soon followed?
 

WDWFigment

Well-Known Member
Having been a Boy Scout myself and one that went on quite a few high adventure outings, I can attest to the fact that most overweight kids just couldn't cut the physical exertion necessary on these outings.


Just to be clear (and I was also a Scout)--I feel exactly the same way. At the risk of receiving an unflattering label, I think the clamor for better "understanding" of the obese is grossly exaggerated. I don't doubt that there are a lot of people who have size issues that are outside their control, but looking back at the America of the 1980s or almost any other contemporary country around the world and contrasting them with contemporary America shows that we have a serious problem with preventable obesity.

Of course, it's easier to dub yourself as a victim of something outside of your control and demand accommodations and acceptance than to accept responsibility for something...
 

Animaniac93-98

Well-Known Member
Just to be clear (and I was also a Scout)--I feel exactly the same way. At the risk of receiving an unflattering label, I think the clamor for better "understanding" of the obese is grossly exaggerated. I don't doubt that there are a lot of people who have size issues that are outside their control, but looking back at the America of the 1980s or almost any other contemporary country around the world and contrasting them with contemporary America shows that we have a serious problem with preventable obesity.

Of course, it's easier to dub yourself as a victim of something outside of your control and demand accommodations and acceptance than to accept responsibility for something...

I wish I could like this more than once, but I'll also say that while body image/self conscious issues are certainly deserving of being discussed and supported there comes a point where people need to put their foot down and say that becoming a 400+ pound sphere is not OK. "Personal Liberty" be damned, it's not good for you.
 

Animaniac93-98

Well-Known Member
While somewhat off topic, I saw this yesterday and it seems fairly on-point: http://www.cnn.com/2013/07/19/health/boy-scouts-bmi/

I thought this was interesting:

"The Boy Scouts have not received any reactions from parents on the BMI issue, he said."

So an outside organization (NAFAA) is using non-associated children to exploit their cause? Always a classy move.

Sounds like the parents know what their kids are getting into and why the rules are in place.
 

the.dreamfinder

Well-Known Member
Just to be clear (and I was also a Scout)--I feel exactly the same way. At the risk of receiving an unflattering label, I think the clamor for better "understanding" of the obese is grossly exaggerated. I don't doubt that there are a lot of people who have size issues that are outside their control, but looking back at the America of the 1980s or almost any other contemporary country around the world and contrasting them with contemporary America shows that we have a serious problem with preventable obesity.

Of course, it's easier to dub yourself as a victim of something outside of your control and demand accommodations and acceptance than to accept responsibility for something...
I'll go further, taxes on soda and processed foods, the elimination of free refills for soft drinks, ending subsidies for corn, and banning processed foods from being advertised on children's shows to get started.
 

Nubs70

Well-Known Member
So.... In layman's terms.... The FUPA popped over the restraint & the rest soon followed?
I almost broke my tablet screen I hit the like button so hard. I laughed so hard I think I may have pooed myself. And I thought I had simplified the analysis. Now off to change my shorts.......
 

englanddg

One Little Spark...
Premium Member
As an Eagle, this makes my heart sad.

Lets review a few things...

The Scout Law
A scout is trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean and reverent.

That being said...

The Scout Oath
On my honor, I will do my best to do my duty to God and my country. To obey the scout Law. To help other people at all times. To keep myself physically strong, mentally awake, and morally straight.

The move from AP Hill (where it has been held since 81) to the Betchel Family reserve, for some very sad reasons why (which I don't care to get into in detail), was a terrible decision, I think.

The "summit" is classified as a high adventure retreat, along the lines of Philmont or Northern Lights. Meaning, the physical demands of the individual participants, even day to day, are extreme. Considering the situation, I do support the decision of the National Council to limit the participation of severely obese people (it's not limited to just children, Scout Leaders are also considered under this limitation). 40 BMI for someone around 5'10" means they are ~275 lbs...think about that. And no, it's not "muscle weight" at that size...

What the article conveniently leaves out is that the Council is reviewing exception cases, with appropriate medical documentation. They merely wish to have their medical staff review these cases, primarily to limit liability in a litigious society that seems content to not only demonize a voluntary, private organization, but to profit from it.

Oddly, the article does not include that BMI is not the only limiting factor (though it is the most media visible, it seems). Due to the nature of the Betchel Reserve, other physical disabilities are excluded.

That being said, I do not agree with the move to a "high adventure" setting, as that is not the purpose of the Jamboree. The Jamboree has always been about socializing and networking, not high adventure. High adventure is for specialized camps that not every scout will attend, either due to physical capacity or circumstance. They are "special events" for a scout. The Jamboree is, and always has been, about accessibility, so that scouts from around the country and around the world can join together to celebrate scouting, it's history and our future.

Many scouts use the Jamboree to get their World Crest and World Conservation Award. The spirit of the Jamboree has always been about inclusion. This is why it has been held (since 81) at a relatively flat, easy to navigate location with physical facilities readily available.

The spirit of the Jamboree was set with the first one, held on the National Mall in 1937. Not to many "high adventure" activities there, unless they rappelled off the Washington Monument or something...

The Summit has facilities (far more than it's cousin Philmont), but it's still classified as high adventure due to terrain and activities. While I'm sure it's a fantastic experience, I, for one, do not support the Council's decision to move the National Jamboree there, and when I learned of the plans, I voiced my concerns through appropriate channels. But, in the end, I know why the move was made, and it's far more complex than "The BSA wants to exclude fat kids"...

Anyhow, ramble over...
 

GiveMeTheMusic

Well-Known Member
I'll never forget the first time I read a Disney fan board and someone mentioned being "Pooh-sized."

It is devastating what happened to this woman - it's literally every coaster rider's worst nightmare. @Lee's post is indeed the most informative thing I've read on the subject so far, and I think it goes without saying that our thoughts and prayers are with the family, especially the child who rode with her.

That does not preclude the allegation that obesity played a part in her death from being discussed. And @the.dreamfinder, you want to talk about curbing it on a societal level? I'd start by cleaning house at the FDA.
 
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