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Spirited News, Observations & Thoughts Tres

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bubbles1812

Well-Known Member
Yes it's all subjective, but some films' influences are more well known than others.

Star Wars is a space western btw. :)
My dad says the same thing. He says the majority of sci-fi stories are really just westerns with a location in space. For Star Wars, I would agree with GLados that it is more a space opera. But there are strains of both.

EDIT: Also, I am going to Pacific Rim tonight (Now actually, lol, at 11 at night... My mom gave me 20 bucks so I don't have to pay ;)) ... Your review nudged me to indulge my brother's pleading. Though my whole family will go to something else tomorrow. But hey, least I can give everyone a review from a person who wasnt enthused about the movie and doesn't have high expectations. Hopefully it'll surprise.
 

dhall

Well-Known Member
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I can't get the sound of Kermit Singing...

Imagination... Imagination..A dream, can be a dream come true.
With just that spark, in me and you.

Kermit singing that just seems like it fits like a glove..
Sam the Eagle would make a great narrator for Spaceship Earth, but I think Bunsen Honeydo & Beaker should do Test Track (using the old storyline rather than the TRON refit)
 

ParentsOf4

Well-Known Member
The current official Disney FastPass+ FAQ includes the following:
The total number of FastPass+ experiences available to you during your visit depends on several factors including availability and the vacation packages and tickets linked to your Disney account. Generally, FastPass+ eligible Guests are able to select one set of FastPass+ experiences each day for every valid theme park ticket linked to their account.

Depending on availability, you should be able to reserve access to up to 4 FastPass+ attractions and entertainment experiences each day.
A few points of interest:
  • Looks like FP+ will be linked to tickets.
  • Looks like it will be possible to book up to 4 FP+ experiences per day.
  • Regarding the "vacation packages" portion, I received the following reply from Disney: "Vacation packages are only available for reservations at a Walt Disney World® Resort. Currently, FastPass®+ is in a product testing phase and is not yet available to all guests. We have not receive details yet on how guests staying off-property will be able to select FastPass®+ options, but our traditional FastPass® service will still be available." So it appears Disney still hasn't publically announced how FP+ will work for offsite guests.
 

ChrisFL

Well-Known Member
My dad says the same thing. He says the majority of sci-fi stories are really just westerns with a location in space. For Star Wars, I would agree with GLados that it is more a space opera. But there are strains of both.
I know that George Lucas took some belief system components from a book he read while he was in a hospital after a car crash...that's how he made "The force".

He also basically transcribed WWII fighter plane footage for the space combat sequences.
 

PhotoDave219

Well-Known Member
Hey Everyone who wanted to read that crazy lady's Sara Strand's Blogs (including @WDW1974)

Here's the google cache links:

Day 1 Where she hates on MK

Day 2 Where she Rants on Epcot

Somewhere lost in her racism, homophobia and xenophobia is the underlying point (I guess) that Disney is an utter pain the the *** for the uninitiated and ill-prepared. It is not for the 1D1P or 2D1P guests anymore; it is a true vacation destination that takes days and planning to be able to do anything. Which is awfully sad....
 

PhotoDave219

Well-Known Member
No. Pish posh. Walt wasn't just a dreamer. He was a visionary.

Watching his girls go round and round, Walt thought ''One day ... One day, I'll create a company that is the timeshare king of the Central Florida swamps. And when I'm dead and gone they'll forget that I drank and smoked and sweared to excess to create this perfect vision of me that will sell timeshares for a long, long time.''


I dont smoke, but there's hope for me yet? ;)
 

Magenta Panther

Well-Known Member
Fantasia is not for everyone for sure. For some people it is high on their list of movies, while for others it is very low. I like it but perhaps moreso out of nostalgia.

I love Fantasia - except the part about dinosaurs. First of all, I hate "Rite of Spring". What a mess of a melody. I can't understand why it's so famous. And the dinosaur segments nowadays look very lame. If that part were cut out, Fantasia would be the perfect animated film IMO. I love the Nutcracker Suite segment. So beautiful...
 

Magenta Panther

Well-Known Member
True, but it was her property that Walt wanted.

And he was extremely difficult himself to work with as any of the greats that worked with him -- and are left -- can attest.

He was a visionary and a genius, but also obstinate and not nice at times. In other words, he was human.

sad thing is many people likely believe he is a character created by TWDC ...no, I am not kidding.

Yeah, some people think he' s like Betty Crocker: a manufactured personality and icon. That's why every person who visits WDW HAS to see "One Man's Dream". It's not a thorough biography of Walt, but it's a decent one considering the venue and length.

And sure, Walt could be difficult. Demanding. Not effusive with praise (his dad was like that too). He smoked (too much), drank (not nearly as much, thank goodness) and he swore (but never in front of women or children). But he wasn't the phony manipulative bigoted moneygrubbing monster some in the press and other media have tried to paint him as. That's the stuff that makes me mad. Some people get a perverse pleasure in tearing him down, because of the family values he stood for. Because some people hate those values. They either think they're entirely false (which is a sad way to think) or they think such values stand in the way of "progress". No, Walt was amazing because he was a good man and accomplished so much despite being human. That's why I admire him so much and why he inspires me still. A person's humanity doesn't have to get in the way of greatness.
 

nytimez

Well-Known Member
In some cases. But sometimes they simply know the truth and prefer the truth to be told.

And what makes you so sure that's the case here?

I won't claim the book is perfect. But I think it was well-sourced and painted an excellent portrait of both his strengths and flaws, and I actually think it leans more toward strengths. Some of the complaints make it seem like Gabler demonized Walt and I don't think he did that at all.

In fact, I think it debunked some of the more persistant Walt myths, such as his supposed racism and antisemitism.

My complaint with the book is that I think it sped too quickly through his final years.
 

ChrisFL

Well-Known Member
And sure, Walt could be difficult. Demanding. Not effusive with praise (his dad was like that too). He smoked (too much), drank (not nearly as much, thank goodness) and he swore (but never in front of women or children). But he wasn't the phony manipulative bigoted moneygrubbing monster some in the press and other media have tried to paint him as. That's the stuff that makes me mad. Some people get a perverse pleasure in tearing him down, because of the family values he stood for. Because some people hate those values. They either think they're entirely false (which is a sad way to think) or they think such values stand in the way of "progress". No, Walt was amazing because he was a good man and accomplished so much despite being human. That's why I admire him so much and why he inspires me still. A person's humanity doesn't have to get in the way of greatness.
Yep. People tear him down because they can't live up to what he accomplished, or can't understand how he could have been such a good person.
 

FigmentJedi

Well-Known Member
I love Fantasia - except the part about dinosaurs. First of all, I hate "Rite of Spring". What a mess of a melody. I can't understand why it's so famous. And the dinosaur segments nowadays look very lame. If that part were cut out, Fantasia would be the perfect animated film IMO. I love the Nutcracker Suite segment. So beautiful...
I'm the exact opposite. Nutcracker Suite's always been my least favorite of the major segments.
 

the.dreamfinder

Well-Known Member
http://www.cartoonbrew.com/disney/the-walt-disney-image-problem-76157.html
Last weekend, The Guardian published a long-ish piece on Philip Glass’s soon-to-debut opera The Perfect American based on the novel of the same name by Peter Stephan Jungk. The book (and it appears the opera, too) is a veritable checklist of accusations that have been leveled against Walt Disney throughout the years: he was a McCarthyite, a racist, a misogynist, an anti-Semite, a megalomaniac. It manages to come up with new fictional flaws too, like philandering and incestuous obsession with his daughters.

Jungk’s book has been described by Walt Disney biographer Michael Barrier as “infantile” and “wretched.” That is perhaps why the Guardian reported that the Disney company called Glass to ask him not to work on the opera. The article also says that the finished opera was submitted to the Disney Studios for consideration, and there was no response. Jungk, the author of the book, said that he interpreted the company’s lack of response as “a green light.”

Glass says that despite all the negative (and untrue) traits the opera attaches to Walt, his intentions were noble:

“When I started out, people thought I was going to laugh at him. But I see Walt Disney as an icon of modernity, a man able to build bridges between highbrow culture and popular culture; just like Leonard Bernstein, who could jump from a Broadway musical to a Mahler cycle.”

To me, the opera is representative of a bigger problem faced by the Disney company, and that is that the company has been unable to present an alternative narrative to the perpetual vilification of Walt Disney in contemporary pop culture. The lack of honest and easy-to-access information about Walt is precisely why a majority of teens and twenty-somethings today have a wildly distorted and inaccurate view of Walt Disney, the man.

The Disney company could do much more to humanize the founder of their company. Instead the company has taken the tactical approach that its founder must be deified. In response, they build statues of Walt using every conceivable material that is known to mankind, from bronze to Tom Hanks.



These statues end up being as one-dimensional and untrue as the negative portrayals. Today’s generation is too savvy to accept an image of Walt Disney as an irreproachable god-like entity, and so they seek their truth elsewhere. It is through this cycle that the Disney company continues to lose control over its founder’s image.



Disney animator and director Ward Kimball, the subject of my own as-yet-unpublished biography, rebelled in his own idiosyncratic fashion against the Disney company’s deification of Walt, which he felt diminished the man’s accomplishments and tainted his legacy. Ward never censored himself when he was asked to speak about Walt Disney at public functions. He made sure to incorporate stories about honest human interactions with Walt, of which he had more of than almost any other artist who worked at the company. In Ward’s stories, Walt may have used a cuss word and he may have just walked out of the bathroom after taking a ****, but he was a human being who people could recognize, understand, and most importantly, admire.

The Disney family-operated Walt Disney Family Museum, in its own way, does a great job of humanizing the founder of the company. However, the museum is not a panacea for Walt’s image problem because its impact is limited to tourists and Disney fans. It cannot combat the steady stream of misinformation about Walt from mainstream cultural sources like Family Guy and Saturday Night Live.

The Disney company itself, with its vast media reach, is in the best position to rehabilitate the image of its founder and offer a counterimage to the flood of negative portrayals of its founder. A good first step would be to acknowledge the fact that Walt Disney wasn’t a god, but a human being.
 

The Duck

Well-Known Member
Hey Everyone who wanted to read that crazy lady's Sara Strand's Blogs (including @WDW1974)

Here's the google cache links:

Day 1 Where she hates on MK

Day 2 Where she Rants on Epcot

Somewhere lost in her racism, homophobia and xenophobia is the underlying point (I guess) that Disney is an utter pain the the *** for the uninitiated and ill-prepared. It is not for the 1D1P or 2D1P guests anymore; it is a true vacation destination that takes days and planning to be able to do anything. Which is awfully sad....
Well, she sounds like a simply lovely individual! A regular Donna F******g Reed.
 

SirLink

Well-Known Member
As a brit, how would you feel if they built a ride in the UK pavilion centered around Wallace and Gromit?
I wouldn't mind quite frankly Wallace and Gromit although in Claymation form best represents the UK in our sense of design, innovation and quirky sensibilities.

However, before that what UK pavilion needs is a ride based on "A Christmas Carol" seen as we are the country that invented Christmas cards. You could even have a little shop selling replicas of early Christmas cards - as well as merchandise from one our most celebrated authors.
 
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