News Remy's Ratatouille Adventure coming to Epcot

Josh Hendy

Well-Known Member
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There were pipes on the side of the building, looks like the addition was to cover them and the door allows access to them.
At a guess, it appears that the chimney to.the left of the pipes was meant to hide them. But somebody goofed and the pipes ended up being too far to the right ... so the awkward shed structure was added.
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The door is just above a big air vent. Maybe there is an emergency generator behind there, the pipes are for feeding it natural gas, and the door is necessary for maintenance access. Or if the generator is diesel, the door is for filling the tank and the pipes are electrical conduits leading to other parts of World Showcase.
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The placement of all of these things may be an unfortunate compromise due to retrofitting a ride into a previously backstage area.
 

CastAStone

Voice of Aladdin’s Magic Carpet
Premium Member
There are 6 rats loading at once, three on the left, and three forward. So it is really a 60-second dispatch per vehicle as only 3 rats dispatch at once. Essentially functions the same as a Big Thunder's double train station.

The restraint system is a lap bar.
So the real question isn’t will it have sufficient capacity (as that will clear most Epcot visitors most days) but rather will it relieve any pressure on the other rides in the park...I’m guessing unfortunately not (except at rope drop), it’s too damn far of a hike.

Edit: Not much of a capacity drop from SSE in the short run though.
 

SplashZander

Well-Known Member
So the real question isn’t will it have sufficient capacity (as that will clear most Epcot visitors most days) but rather will it relieve any pressure on the other rides in the park...I’m guessing unfortunately not (except at rope drop), it’s too damn far of a hike.
It manages to pull large waits in Paris. It will be a nice addition to the park and will definitely pull in substantial waits, how high is anyone's guess.
 

michmousefan

Well-Known Member
You know, if they can't move or close the windoor, they should've adjusted the fake windows around that so they all match
Yes, or at least continued that elaborate moulding alongside the bottom of the doors — create it with a break in the middle so the doors could still open as needed. Without that, it really does stand out.
 

Texas84

Premium Member
It's a neologistic portmanteau!

Anyhoo...

The Windoor is probably a service door to get big equipment in and out of the building.

So, think of it as that. The story of the place setting is that the building houses an artist's studio who creates large sculpture and portraiture. The barn door is for loading and unloading of their large pieces.
That's a real thing in older cities. My downtown has several outside doors on upper levels.
 

MisterPenguin

Rumormonger
Premium Member
That's a real thing in older cities. My downtown has several outside doors on upper levels.
Indeed, the back of an attraction in Epcot also had it, too!

Yeah, I don't know why people are freaking out about this. These service doors are not unknown to appear in cities. Especially if the building was originally industrial use and converted into residences.

Elevated doors to nowhere are not uncommon. They get used, or used to get used, for specific reasons.
 

Prototype82

Well-Known Member
The door really doesn't bother me. Heck, even hiding that vent with a wrought iron frame doesn't bother me. But how awkward is it going to be to walk beside the IdF show building, look up, and see that the edge of the roof is hanging off the edge of the building? It wasn't meant to be seen from these distances or angles, the balcony is massively blown up out of proportion to be seen from a distance... It's a shame that these show buildings didn't get the kind of overhaul dreamed up in the concept art. Hoping the right amount of paint and dressing-up will make them work. That rant aside, I'm ready for the ride and crepes...🙃
 

UNCgolf

Well-Known Member
Indeed, the back of an attraction in Epcot also had it, too!

Yeah, I don't know why people are freaking out about this. These service doors are not unknown to appear in cities. Especially if the building was originally industrial use and converted into residences.

Elevated doors to nowhere are not uncommon. They get used, or used to get used, for specific reasons.
I think the door is far less of an issue than the overall design of the building -- I think if the building didn't look so out of place, fewer people would care about the door. But maybe not; who knows?
 
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