News Remy's Ratatouille Adventure coming to Epcot

lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
Wouldn't the fact that they used green suggest they will be using trees to mitigate that? I would think even if the trees were behind the pavilion, it would go a long way in camouflaging the supports
They’d have to put the trees on a roof. The trees would also mess with the original design as Paris isn’t know for the trees looming overhead.
 

jinx8402

Well-Known Member
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They’d have to put the trees on a roof. The trees would also mess with the original design as Paris isn’t know for the trees looming overhead.
I was thinking if they were planted essentially outside of EPCOT, like if they lined Avenue of the Stars with the trees, but I guess that might not be doable either whether due to space or the size of tree that would be required.
 

Marc Davis Fan

Well-Known Member
How long until someone realizes how bad of an idea it was to paint those facade supports green? They are so noticeably bad when walking over from UK. Can't believe I'm saying this, but a little go-away blue would do wonders....
I think that was definitely a straightforward design error, wherein they didn't properly consider the angle of approach from UK. (Does anyone have a photo?)

Now it remains to be seen whether they will change the color. In the old days, it would have been certain. Today, not so sure...
 

Josh Hendy

Well-Known Member
Why is it even there? Anyone know?
My guess is, there is mechanical equipment inside such as HVAC, or maybe a hoist.

I don't think the door will be very noticeable given the angle it is at relative to people walking along to take the Remy ride. I assume they will be walking down the "street" toward the fountain and would have to look up at 45° over their left shoulder ... with trees in front.

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The blue color I'm not so sure about. I don't know if that color is used much in Paris. It looks more like New England than France. Perhaps the designers were aiming to hit a slightly jarring color note in order to energize guests and keep them moving towards the ride. Compare for example to a Zen garden whose harmonious, subtle colors invite people to slow down and contemplate.
 

nickys

Premium Member
The blue color I'm not so sure about. I don't know if that color is used much in Paris. It looks more like New England than France. Perhaps the designers were aiming to hit a slightly jarring color note in order to energize guests and keep them moving towards the ride. Compare for example to a Zen garden whose harmonious, subtle colors invite people to slow down and contemplate.
Hmmm, you got me thinkimg. I googled “colour schemes in Paris” and got this paragraph in an article:


One of the many things I love about Paris is her colour scheme. Wherever you look, whether from street level or above, you’ll see consistent colours. Beautiful hues. The neutral sort.
There is no doubt about it – charcoals, mid-greys, slate blues, russets, taupes and sands dominate your view. These colours are everywhere – on buildings, in paths, on roofs, in decor stores. And I’m convinced that this colour chart not only adds to Paris’ charm but also underpins the city’s elegance.


I’m not convinced this blue could be described as a neutral shade of blue. But maybe they are onto something. 🤔
 

Josh Hendy

Well-Known Member
I’m not convinced this blue could be described as a neutral shade of blue. But maybe they are onto something. 🤔
The "slate blue" in the article appears to be referring to the rooftops, which are I assume literally made of slate on large public buildings. Or perhaps lead sometimes.

I looked at street views for several neighborhoods in Paris and I couldn't find any buildings painted blue. On typical side streets every single building is one of: white, cream, yellow, beige. When the building has a business on the ground floor, then that floor alone is often painted in a loud color such as red or green, with matching awnings. On a single building I found blue shutters on the upper floors.

Maybe Joe Rhode or somebody did a research trip to Paris, found a single blue building, came home and fought for this ...
 

UNCgolf

Well-Known Member
I didn't see any blue buildings last time I was in Paris, but that doesn't mean they don't exist. In fact, I'm sure there are blue buildings somewhere; it's a huge city.

The color isn't the biggest problem, though -- the building itself doesn't look Parisian. I think the blue color makes it more noticeable, but it looks like a building you'd find in Boston, not in Paris.
 
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Timothy_Q

Well-Known Member
I don't think the door will be very noticeable given the angle it is at relative to people walking along to take the Remy ride. I assume they will be walking down the "street" toward the fountain and would have to look up at 45° over their left shoulder ... with trees in front.
So just like any 2nd story window in any building anywhere.

This isn't any different than Main Street.
The window will be very noticeable
 
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