On layoffs, very bad attendance, and Iger's legacy being one of disgrace

mkt

Maleante Izquierdozo
Premium Member
That's probably 1/4 a security deposit needed to secure a new place... But no... I can't afford to do anything but sit in place... *tears*
In an apartment complex, maybe.

A privately owned condo, 3 months up front: first, last, and deposit.
 

Joe

I'm only visiting this planet.
Premium Member
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FFS these people have a no strike clause in their contract.
A no strike clause is only valid during the life of the contract. Once the contract expires, they can strike.
 

flynnibus

Premium Member
In an apartment complex, maybe.

A privately owned condo, 3 months up front: first, last, and deposit.
$200 is still more than $0.... and if someone wants to move, they should prioritize their needs. Or... just keep complaining about how bad Orlando is... not sure what they want to happen. Fairy comes down and plucks them away if they wish on a shooting star?
 

DisneyDebRob

Well-Known Member
Dreading a phone call from HR, told you have a meeting at HR, it's all the same. Many companies are restructuring and anyone can be replaced or let go and the surviving ones who made the cut have more of the work.
Been that way since the beginning of time.
 

Tom Morrow

Well-Known Member
This thread is interesting because it really sheds light on a decision I made over 25 years ago. Like most here, I grew up in awe of Disney World. Our family trips every few years from the 70s through to the early 90s are some of my happiest memories growing up. The last trip we took together as a family was after my freshman year at university. I enjoyed this trip just as much as the others, but being 19, lets just say I was now noticing some of the prettier young female cast members much more than on prior visits. After striking up a conversation with a monorail attendant whose university was in the same state as mine, I learned about the Disney college program. I thought that would be a really fun way to spend the summer with a huge cohort around my same age and make some money for the following school year.

My first inkling that maybe this wouldn't be a great choice was that my university did not participate in the program. When I received the application in the mail, I then realized that I would need to miss a significant amount of school, the salary was really low, and I would lose a significant portion of my salary on lodging, since my home state was Pennsylvania. There was a good chance that I might barely break even. All for a summer job that provided no relevant experience for my desired career. So, the Disney dream died very quickly and definitively for me that day. The application went into the garbage, I didn't miss any school, and I took a decent-paying summer job close to home. 25 years later and I'm doing very well in my desired profession.

I kind of wonder... is that how it starts for most cast members? If I had filled out that application, and attended the Disney seminar at a nearby university, would I have been one of those sitting in a shared Orlando apartment, dreading a phone call from HR that my services were no longer necessary?
The college program is definitely a major reason why so many move to Orlando to work at Disney. The program itself presents a skewed version of actually living and working for the mouse to support yourself. CP’s who do any respectable level of work are often showered with praise (mileage may vary) and this also leads to an impression that, if only they were a full or part time CM, they’d be rising in the ranks quickly. Unfortunately, it isn’t true, for most.
 
Frugality is certainly a virtue, but it’s also become a cult. It’s extremely common amongst my generation that grew up in the shadow of the 2008 crash and particularly in my line of work (accounting/finance). You’re correct, if someone is struggling, the first two things that they bring up are “takeout coffee” and “smartphones.” As though these are the cause of all social ills.

These people love Dave Ramsey, think all debt is bad, and aspire to live on shoestring budgets. Dislikes include new cars (never allowed), Starbucks, and the suburbs. Of course travel is still allowed since that’s not consumption... it’s an “experience that makes you cultured.” I mean, how could anyone ever be truly cultured until they can post a picture on Instagram of themselves holding up the Leaning Tower of Pisa with their bare hand? Well, forgo the iPhone and the coffee long enough, and you can be cultured too!

Again, I have no issues with frugality. The Greatest Generation was frugal. They didn’t shout it out loud, though - they just lived it. But Dave Ramsey (and his contemporaries), as well as social media, have changed the landscape. Now it’s all about shaming people for their bad decisions.
I enjoy Ramsey's advice, but if you followed his advice to a tee, you'd be driving a used 2000 Honda for life, never use a credit card, work two jobs, would never be able to invest if you have even an inkling of debt to your name, etc. I think he sometimes takes budgeting to the next level, to the point you'd might as well live one mundane and boring life and never spend a dime to enjoy anything.
 

ElvisMickey

Well-Known Member
This thread is interesting because it really sheds light on a decision I made over 25 years ago. Like most here, I grew up in awe of Disney World. Our family trips every few years from the 70s through to the early 90s are some of my happiest memories growing up. The last trip we took together as a family was after my freshman year at university. I enjoyed this trip just as much as the others, but being 19, lets just say I was now noticing some of the prettier young female cast members much more than on prior visits. After striking up a conversation with a monorail attendant whose university was in the same state as mine, I learned about the Disney college program. I thought that would be a really fun way to spend the summer with a huge cohort around my same age and make some money for the following school year.

My first inkling that maybe this wouldn't be a great choice was that my university did not participate in the program. When I received the application in the mail, I then realized that I would need to miss a significant amount of school, the salary was really low, and I would lose a significant portion of my salary on lodging, since my home state was Pennsylvania. There was a good chance that I might barely break even. All for a summer job that provided no relevant experience for my desired career. So, the Disney dream died very quickly and definitively for me that day. The application went into the garbage, I didn't miss any school, and I took a decent-paying summer job close to home. 25 years later and I'm doing very well in my desired profession.

I kind of wonder... is that how it starts for most cast members? If I had filled out that application, and attended the Disney seminar at a nearby university, would I have been one of those sitting in a shared Orlando apartment, dreading a phone call from HR that my services were no longer necessary?
A lot of cute Cast Members out there...Only Fans is always an option 😝.
 

TeriofTerror

Well-Known Member
This thread seems long on judgement and short on empathy. If anyone thinks they're offering helpful financial advice, perhaps someone should let them know it's coming across more like smug condescension.
(Unless it's just me; in which case, I apologize.)
 

NelsonRD

Well-Known Member
This entire discussion was about people working for Disney stuck in the rut. Typically the low wage, hourly workers. If you are only making like $10-11 an hour... you can go hundreds of places and find walk up jobs making that kind of pay.

The whole point is.. if you are at the bottom as so many claim orlando+disney is for pay and COLA.. then almost anywhere else is an improvement. You don't need to 'align skils and interest' when any entry level job will be a huge improvement over your current situation. Work hospitality? There are hotels everywere... Work retail? Same.

The idea that Orlando is the only place you can find work is bunkus.



This is exactly what people are saying YOU CAN NOT DO at Disney - it's the false dream that so many think 'if they just stick it out' they can make it through the low years. But there is no 'high years' at Disney. You climb to be the hotel AGM and you still get crap pay, living in a expensive place. All while the people do get promoted aren't the best.. and the work culture is toxic. You're preaching right into the false dream every person who has left Disney has called out as 'never going to happen... and it took me too long to realize it'

Or you leave... work your way up in another hotel, live in nicer place, cheaper, and ultimately make more money when you've climbed that ladder.

I'm not preaching a 'grass is greener... move' thing. I'm saying if you live in the worst of the worst... LEAVE.



So you believe if you work in a company that doesn't treat its employees with respect, doesn't pay well, festers horrible manager/subordinate relationships, measures performance in ways that dehumanize people, promotes the boot lickers, and is pretty much respected as a toxic place towards workers... If you just tough it out.. it will get better?

Why insist on wasting your years on an environment that will not pay off - when literally there are thousands of alternatives where you do stand a fighting chance?

Why are people insistent in staying in an abusive relationship? Because they think its the only thing they can do...

Do you really think a parallel move is better? Do you think working at another hotel chain in another town is the solution? Working for Burger King opposed to McDonalds, finding happiness at Arby's? The false dream here is not having hope given your current situation, but that being a transient worker will eventually lead you to the perfect job. No job is perfect, which is why when starting a business, they say do something you love, because even then, it will be a struggle to make you feel like giving up. Sorry, but the real world is filled with bad bosses, and all jobs will have elements that you may not like, not just working for Disney.

This never-ending pursuit of happiness is why clinical depression is skyrocketing in this country. Every job is better, every relationship is better, until is isn't. Your lack of perseverance is exactly what is wrong with people today. Something doesn't make you 'feel' good, quit. Your lack of understanding from anything other than your own optics is appalling.

The point here is clear, going from job to job is not a fundamental strategy to get ahead. Staying at your current job is, look for opportunity, and take action. At some point it may be time to move on, but it shouldn't be a quit first, try again later approach.

If you go the extra mile, the road is often less crowded.
 

flynnibus

Premium Member
This thread seems long on judgement and short on empathy. If anyone thinks they're offering helpful financial advice, perhaps someone should let them know it's coming across more like smug condescension.
(Unless it's just me; in which case, I apologize.)
It can be summed up really easy. 'Are you working to change anything?' - If they can't outline what they are doing to change things - then sure, call it smug... because yes, as an adult I expect people to look out for themselves and their future. Not just complain about it.
 

flynnibus

Premium Member
Do you really think a parallel move is better? Do you think working at another hotel chain in another town is the solution? Working for Burger King opposed to McDonalds, finding happiness at Arby's? The false dream here is not having hope given your current situation, but that being a transient worker will eventually lead you to the perfect job.
You clearly haven't listened to any of the stories over and over and over from people about their attempts to progress in the Disney Parks & Resort machine. Nor people's woes about CM pay and living situations in Orlando.

Not everywhere is like what Orlando is.
 

networkpro

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
Yes
It can be summed up really easy. 'Are you working to change anything?' - If they can't outline what they are doing to change things - then sure, call it smug... because yes, as an adult I expect people to look out for themselves and their future. Not just complain about it.
But some do vote for a living, is that close enough?
 

NelsonRD

Well-Known Member
You clearly haven't listened to any of the stories over and over and over from people about their attempts to progress in the Disney Parks & Resort machine. Nor people's woes about CM pay and living situations in Orlando.

Not everywhere is like what Orlando is.
For every story of being passed over for a promotion at Disney, there is another story for one who has. This happens in every industry where not everybody gets promoted. I am sorry that it shakes out that way for people, but complaining and quitting isn't healthy.
 

flynnibus

Premium Member
For every story of being passed over for a promotion at Disney, there is another story for one who has. This happens in every industry where not everybody gets promoted. I am sorry that it shakes out that way for people, but complaining and quitting isn't healthy.
But being miserable and poor is? Ok... *rolleyes*

hey @mkt , @BigThunderMatt - sorry you were just the ones that make up the lower side of 'average' according to Nelson here... sorry you lost the lotto ;)

Sorry NelsonRD - not all companies are great places to work. Employees need to learn to spot the tells and cut and run. Not just hope if they grind it out... somehow the tigger will change it's stripes.
 

ElvisMickey

Well-Known Member
man.. now you're gonna blow people's minds... CMs using ****ography to pay their bills... the bubble is crashing! :D
Wouldn’t be the first time 😝! But usually it’s the dudes living in their mom’s basement PAYING. The Sentinel loves to point that out!
 
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