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News New Signature Restaurant for Japan Pavilion - Takumi-Tei

ParksAndPixels

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
Yes
In May the DW and I ate at Jiko which has a dress code. Unfortunately it does not seem to be enforced another example of rules don't apply to me just the other guy.

We really enjoy Jiko. Dress code should be enforced at resort restaurants. It might be inconvenient if you’re not staying at that resort, but if you want to dress casual, go to a casual dinner. In the theme parks, a dress code is tough (beyond business casual). Tiffins is a good alternative to Jiko that doesn’t require leaving the park or as strict of a dress code.
 

DisneyDaver

Well-Known Member
In May the DW and I ate at Jiko which has a dress code. Unfortunately it does not seem to be enforced another example of rules don't apply to me just the other guy.

I suspect that most guests not following the dress code are fine with the "other guy" not following the dress code either. I think the mindset is that "no one follows the dress codes at WDW restaurants other than V&A."
 

John park hopper

Well-Known Member
I suspect that most guests not following the dress code are fine with the "other guy" not following the dress code either. I think the mindset is that "no one follows the dress codes at WDW restaurants other than V&A."
If that is the case Disney should remove all their restaurant dress codes, if the guests are not going to follow the rules and Disney won't enforce it --what's the point
 
If it’s a multi-course tasting menu centering around wagyu beef (I’m hoping it’s the “real” Japanese beef) I could see them not taking the dining plan. Between the cost of the beef and courses that might not fit into appetizer, entree, dessert categories it may not make sense. Will be interesting to see.
 
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NoChesterHester

Well-Known Member
They should terminate the dining plan from the signature restaurants and enforce the dress codes. The last couple of times at California Grill and a few others you should have seen some of the looks. I would have been embarrassed looking like some of them. Children should also look nice when dining in signature restaurants as well.

Harder to do for in park signature restaurants, but should definitely be the case for in-Resort signature restaurants. My family always cleans up before going to Cali Grill or Flying Fish. It’s a respect thing.
 

NoChesterHester

Well-Known Member
If it’s a multi-course tasting menu centering around waygu beef (I’m hoping it’s the “real” Japanese beef) I could see them not taking the dining plan. Between the cost of the beef and courses that might not fit into appetizer, entree, dessert categories it may not make sense. Will be interesting to see.

If they do true A5 beef, then there isn’t a possibility it could be covered on 2 credits unless the portion is paltry. I hope they offer it as an option. There aren’t many places that offer that level of splurge.
 

SteveBrickNJ

Well-Known Member
Harder to do for in park signature restaurants, but should definitely be the case for in-Resort signature restaurants. My family always cleans up before going to Cali Grill or Flying Fish. It’s a respect thing.
Well stated by @NoChesterHester ....I think that if you are in a theme park in the morning , afternoon and evening, it's a bit weird to be wearing your "fine clothes" as you go on the rides....just 'cause @ 6pm you have dinner in a Signature dining location. Yet, if the Signature Dining is NOT in a Theme Park then every effort should be made to look nice.
 

aladdin2007

Well-Known Member
They should terminate the dining plan from the signature restaurants and enforce the dress codes. The last couple of times at California Grill and a few others you should have seen some of the looks. I would have been embarrassed looking like some of them. Children should also look nice when dining in signature restaurants as well.

agree, the last time at California Grill it was no different than a counter service cafeteria, we were not impressed at all. I guess our hopes were too high thinking it was geared more towards adults, but it was children running amok, large strollers everywhere and so many were in flip flops and attire coming right from MK, most likely.
 

MisterPenguin

Fully Pfizered!
Premium Member
Imposing a dress code is a luxury few restaurants can afford if it means significantly less customers.

The Edison was supposed to have a dress code and that quickly became limited to late night when they had entertainment... because that's when they had a lot a business and could be picky.

V&A gets away with it because they're specifically catering to high end clientelle and have a small venue and make people pay for that luxury of an intimate venue. And not taking DDP helps keep it that way.

Takumi-Tei could attempt do do the same thing as V&A, but if that means half-empty restaurant all the time because of both the price and the dress code... the dress code will be the first to fall.
 

wdwfan22

Well-Known Member
Imposing a dress code is a luxury few restaurants can afford if it means significantly less customers.

The Edison was supposed to have a dress code and that quickly became limited to late night when they had entertainment... because that's when they had a lot a business and could be picky.

V&A gets away with it because they're specifically catering to high end clientelle and have a small venue and make people pay for that luxury of an intimate venue. And not taking DDP helps keep it that way.

Takumi-Tei could attempt do do the same thing as V&A, but if that means half-empty restaurant all the time because of both the price and the dress code... the dress code will be the first to fall.

They could afford to enforce it. The Signature restaurants are suppose to cater to higher end clientele. The Disney Dining Plan changed all that. Years ago the signature restaurants did just that. Pricing hasn't changed either.
 

WDWtraveler

Well-Known Member
Photo update as of Friday, June 14, 2019. Dense landscaping being installed around the new restaurant wing.

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IMG_1411.JPG


IMG_1412.JPG
 

TrojanUSC

Well-Known Member
If that is the case Disney should remove all their restaurant dress codes, if the guests are not going to follow the rules and Disney won't enforce it --what's the point

Two male friends were told we would not be permitted to dine at CA Grill unless they removed their baseball hats (one of which was Disney). Found it... odd... especially considering lots of women were wearing tiaras and Mickey Ears.
 

John park hopper

Well-Known Member
In the past it has always been proper for males to remove their hats in doors. It has not been the case for females. I'm old school and remove my hat I hate to see baseball hats worn in restaurants but that's just me

"In Western culture, it has always been considered rude or disrespectful for a man to wear a hat inside a building, including a church building. Even a generation ago, when men commonly wore hats, the headgear was removed indoors, or even outdoors in the presence of a woman."
 
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DisneyDaver

Well-Known Member
"In Western culture, it has always been considered rude or disrespectful for a man to wear a hat inside a building ..."

I ask this seriously ... why is it considered rude or disrespectful? This seems very arbitrary to me ... like a group of people decided this 200 years ago and then others have continued to do it over the years.

Twenty Five years ago, I wore a suit and a baseball cap (clean and nothing offensive on it) to a college formal. The next formal, I was not the only one.
 

Master Yoda

Pro Star Wars geek.
Premium Member
I ask this seriously ... why is it considered rude or disrespectful? This seems very arbitrary to me ... like a group of people decided this 200 years ago and then others have continued to do it over the years.

Twenty Five years ago, I wore a suit and a baseball cap (clean and nothing offensive on it) to a college formal. The next formal, I was not the only one.
Because reasons. ;)

It is pretty much the same reason anything in any culture becomes acceptable or offensive. Somewhere, someone had a reason to do a thing and that thing stuck around long after its usefulness and became tradition or etiquette.

For the custom in question, it supposedly dates back to medieval times where knights would remove their helmets when entering a building so as not to appear threatening. There are also links to military code and church etiquette.
 
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