News New Park Entrance coming to Epcot

Master Yoda

Pro Star Wars geek.
Premium Member
@ImperfectPixie has the right idea. In the phrase "Guest Entrance", the word 'guest' is being used as an adjective (happens a lot in English, like Eiffel Tower or pedestrian crossing). Adjectives rarely are declined in the plural form (look at the yellows flowers!). Another way of constructing a similar sentiment is to create an adjectival form for 'guest', such as 'Guestal Entrance'.

In the phrase "Guest without bags", it is usually understood that since "guest" is being used as a noun, then the noun should be declined to take the plural form, "guests."

However, you, @G00fyDad, are interpreting the whole phrase as an adjectival phrasal modifier of "line". You're thinking, "this is a guest line", more specifically, "a guest without bags line." In that case, then, yes, "guest" used as an adjective and thus would be singular in form.

Of course, you're entirely wrong for throwing an understood "line" onto the phrase. 😜
Reason number 57,164,657 of why the English language sucks.
 

Nunu

Premium Member
And just to make this subject even more confusing and complicated:
Technically, I could pass thru that line with my usual backpack, since that is a bag, not bags.
I'd be, a "Guest without bagS". o_O😆

That sign should read:
"Guests without bags".
 

ParksAndPixels

Well-Known Member
@ImperfectPixie has the right idea. In the phrase "Guest Entrance", the word 'guest' is being used as an adjective (happens a lot in English, like Eiffel Tower or pedestrian crossing). Adjectives rarely are declined in the plural form (look at the yellows flowers!). Another way of constructing a similar sentiment is to create an adjectival form for 'guest', such as 'Guestal Entrance'.

In the phrase "Guest without bags", it is usually understood that since "guest" is being used as a noun, then the noun should be declined to take the plural form, "guests."

However, you, @G00fyDad, are interpreting the whole phrase as an adjectival phrasal modifier of "line". You're thinking, "this is a guest line", more specifically, "a guest without bags line." In that case, then, yes, "guest" used as an adjective and thus would be singular in form.

Of course, you're entirely wrong for throwing an understood "line" onto the phrase. 😜
...and this nonsense, explains my English grade in High School. If I were still a student today, I think I’d just claim that the material is offensive, racially charged and against my religious beliefs. That would work to get me out of the exam! Right?
 

roj2323

Well-Known Member
Found this picture on Twitter. I believe it’s from the forbidden site. New planters have been formed, and some rebar has been laid down for concrete pouring.View attachment 421133
Well at least it looks like half of the new entry will be open when the holidays arrive. It doesn't look like they will have it wrapped up (both sides) before January however unless they get a move on here pretty quick.
 
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