Is this really a service dog?

NiarrNDisney

Well-Known Member
No you didn't. You made up a completely new term "Emotional Support Service Dog.*

Oh lawd this again? My present to myself is that I am not even going to bother with this conversation especially since I originally had it back in April of 2018. Happy Holidays to you! Find someone else to troll as my next step will be to ignore you.

Edit: Any further questions please refer to post #234 that I made on Apr. 19th 2018 as it sums up my feelings.
 
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thomas998

Well-Known Member
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And until somebody actually does time for this rampant fraud, it's meaningless. I have yet to ever hear of any enforcement in CA.
You never will because every business is too terrified to ever question anyone because the ADA laws also make it very easy for someone to sue the business that dares to question the legitimacy of the animal.
 

thomas998

Well-Known Member
In NJ, no one that I'm aware of has ever been fined let alone jailed for having a fake service animal. We need licences to drive, get married, buy a gun, now it's time to have a UNIVERSAL service, support animal. They should be registered and licensed by an independent agency that is accredited and is deemed acceptable by a federal agency. Until the federal policy is changed, this problem will never be solved. If I need a permit to cut down a tree on my property, I should have to obtain a permit/license for my service animal. For the honest people that truly need one, I'm sorry, but as usual, the bad ones ruin it for everyone else.
The closest example is a handicap license plate or hang tag for your car. The DMV doesn't just hand them out like candy, you have to get a licensed medical doctor to sign a form that indicates you need that handicap tag... How hard would it be to simply require a person that needs a service dog to do the same thing and then just be required to slip the official license from the government into whatever doggie vest the dog wears so everyone would know it was a legit animal.
 

Lilofan

Well-Known Member
You know how people run around on “Stolen Valor” videos and screaming Stolen Valor?.....can we come up with something similar? I’m ok with yelling “Fraud” at people.
You're brave to yell Fraud at people you don't know. There are some people that carry concealed weapons so one never knows how someone is going to react.
 

thomas998

Well-Known Member
You're brave to yell Fraud at people you don't know. There are some people that carry concealed weapons so one never knows how someone is going to react.
Well that would be a interesting conundrum... since owning having a concealed carry or even owning a gun is illegal if you have a mental illness I'm not sure how one of these people that need the emotional support animals could legally have a gun. I mean it seems logical to most people that needing to have a mini-horse with you 24/7 would certainly fall into the category of mental illness.
 

MinnieM123

Well-Known Member
You're brave to yell Fraud at people you don't know. There are some people that carry concealed weapons so one never knows how someone is going to react.
Regarding your response above to @EOD K9 , I assume you're referencing within the parks only. If so, wouldn't the metal detectors at guest security check-in areas, set off a signal for a hidden weapon? I would hope so! ;) Note: EOD K9 is a K9 police officer, (as he's shared in the forums before), so my guess is he's trained to handle difficult situations with people.
 

Lilofan

Well-Known Member
Regarding your response above to @EOD K9 , I assume you're referencing within the parks only. If so, wouldn't the metal detectors at guest security check-in areas, set off a signal for a hidden weapon? I would hope so! ;) Note: EOD K9 is a K9 police officer, (as he's shared in the forums before), so my guess is he's trained to handle difficult situations with people.
The forum member I assumed yelling "fraud" in everyday circumstances not just to enter a theme park. And one knows there is no bag check to enter the Disney Springs complex.
 

Lilofan

Well-Known Member
Well that would be a interesting conundrum... since owning having a concealed carry or even owning a gun is illegal if you have a mental illness I'm not sure how one of these people that need the emotional support animals could legally have a gun. I mean it seems logical to most people that needing to have a mini-horse with you 24/7 would certainly fall into the category of mental illness.
To each his own however I would not yell "fraud" to an unsuspecting person out in public. Would you and then be prepared for their reactive measures?
 

larryz

Completely Transparent
Premium Member
I mean it seems logical to most people that needing to have a mini-horse with you 24/7 would certainly fall into the category of mental illness.
Time out -- mini-horses are recognized by law as service animals trained to perform specific physical functions people can't perform themselves.

Needing one 24/7 is NOT an indication of mental illness.

I recommend you change your "mini-horse" reference to "ferret" or "penguin."
 
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thomas998

Well-Known Member
Time out -- mini-horses are recognized by law as service animals trained to perform specific physical functions people can't perform themselves.

Needing one 24/7 is NOT an indication of mental illness.

I recommend you change your "mini-horse" reference to "ferret" or "penguin."
Never seen a mini-horse that was trained as a seeing eye dog, they are used by people that need "emotional support" which falls into the mental illness category. If they were leading around a blind person then it would be a physical condition but anytime someone needs a mini-horse, ferret or any other animal for companionship that's a mental illness. Normal people don't need to have their pet to keep from having a panic attack, though I seriously doubt any of the con-artists running around with their mini-horses or other animals would really have a panic attack as they are just trying to game the system. It seems so funny that years ago you never heard about anyone needing a emotional support animal.. .now suddenly when airlines are forced to allow them everyone start popping up with a need for one.
 

The Mom

Moderator
Premium Member
Never seen a mini-horse that was trained as a seeing eye dog, they are used by people that need "emotional support" which falls into the mental illness category. If they were leading around a blind person then it would be a physical condition but anytime someone needs a mini-horse, ferret or any other animal for companionship that's a mental illness. Normal people don't need to have their pet to keep from having a panic attack, though I seriously doubt any of the con-artists running around with their mini-horses or other animals would really have a panic attack as they are just trying to game the system. It seems so funny that years ago you never heard about anyone needing a emotional support animal.. .now suddenly when airlines are forced to allow them everyone start popping up with a need for one.
 

jaklgreen

Well-Known Member
Airlines will never do anything because they are afraid of being sued. Just carry some sugar free snack loaded with xylitol and feed these "service dogs"... If its a real service dog it isn't going to be tempted by a treat from a stranger.. If it isn't then 10 or 15 minutes later and the problem is solved.
I think that they would rather get sued by the dog owner the parent of a child that got bit. That is some serious bad PR to have people say that they saw the dog lunge at kids and the airline did not remove causing a child to get injured. But, the way society is now, who knows. I am still shocked that there are so many people out there that have jumped on this emotional support bandwagon and that society is allowing it.
 

thomas998

Well-Known Member
I think that they would rather get sued by the dog owner the parent of a child that got bit. That is some serious bad PR to have people say that they saw the dog lunge at kids and the airline did not remove causing a child to get injured. But, the way society is now, who knows. I am still shocked that there are so many people out there that have jumped on this emotional support bandwagon and that society is allowing it.
Sadly the airline will just let a kid get bit and then try to push the blame all on to the dog owner, when the airlines are really just as much to blame for it happening.
 

thomas998

Well-Known Member
If they are willing to revise it to include horses they should also revise it to require medical proof of the disability and a very large fine for using one without a license.
 

helenabear

Well-Known Member
The closest example is a handicap license plate or hang tag for your car. The DMV doesn't just hand them out like candy, you have to get a licensed medical doctor to sign a form that indicates you need that handicap tag... How hard would it be to simply require a person that needs a service dog to do the same thing and then just be required to slip the official license from the government into whatever doggie vest the dog wears so everyone would know it was a legit animal.
Doctors are not the ones with the service dogs though. Having a note from a doctor wouldn't help either because you could just pretend any dog is a service animal. You would have to go through hundreds of schools across the country to accredit. Plus you can train the dog yourself by law. Who will be in charge of all of this?

Personally it would be nice to have a license but the reality of it is so hard. Not all dogs wear the same kind of vests or harnesses. I think a physical card would be better than a specific vest that may not work well for all types of dogs.
 

EOD K9

Well-Known Member
To each his own however I would not yell "fraud" to an unsuspecting person out in public. Would you and then be prepared for their reactive measures?
I don’t yell stolen valor out, as much as I’d love to I also wouldn’t call people out in public, as much as I’d love to. My post obviously didn’t convey clearly the fact that there should be a way to call people out. I’ve had people go from zero to sixty while working, I try not to engage with anyone off duty either.
 

Incomudro

Well-Known Member
The closest example is a handicap license plate or hang tag for your car. The DMV doesn't just hand them out like candy, you have to get a licensed medical doctor to sign a form that indicates you need that handicap tag... How hard would it be to simply require a person that needs a service dog to do the same thing and then just be required to slip the official license from the government into whatever doggie vest the dog wears so everyone would know it was a legit animal.
It should be MORE difficult to get a service dog license/permit than it is to get a handicap placard as far as I'm concerned.
Because faking a service dog has more of a potential impact than faking parking spot access.
 

Demarke

Premium Member
Never seen a mini-horse that was trained as a seeing eye dog, they are used by people that need "emotional support" which falls into the mental illness category. If they were leading around a blind person then it would be a physical condition but anytime someone needs a mini-horse, ferret or any other animal for companionship that's a mental illness. Normal people don't need to have their pet to keep from having a panic attack, though I seriously doubt any of the con-artists running around with their mini-horses or other animals would really have a panic attack as they are just trying to game the system. It seems so funny that years ago you never heard about anyone needing a emotional support animal.. .now suddenly when airlines are forced to allow them everyone start popping up with a need for one.
Guide horses are definitely a thing, I didn’t really understand why until reading something recently that pointed out that the horses can live up to 3x as long as a seeing eye dog, which is a major benefit over having to purchase or train a new dog every 12 years or so and go through the challenges of acclimating to a new service animal. I imagine that other people are probably also less likely to try to play with, feed, or otherwise distract a mini horse while it’s working.
 
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