News Disney names D’Amaro as Chairman Disney Parks Experiences and Products

Sirwalterraleigh

Premium Member
I won't even touch on the others but that 2nd and last bullet, come on...
Those are probably the strongest points if you look at the last 15 years of management moves.
They’re not assumptions and most have been expressed publicly.
Exactly. I’ll never be able to understand anyone who doesn’t believe they’re trying to max out the pricing.

Or is everyone an “armchair capitalist” again today? 🙄
 
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TJ Vazquez

Premium Member
In the Parks
No
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They’re not assumptions and most have been expressed publicly.
I know your feelings about Iger from other threads, so to each their own. I recommend people pick up a book and read from the horse's mouth as well. My views changed when I read his most recent book. I understand that he will make his tenure sound as shiney as possible but there are some great points made, along with some interesting things that happened in his time there.

As long as Disney stock trades on Wall Street, it really doesn't matter who is sitting in that CEO seat, shareholders will always be the prevailing voice. So yes desert parties, budget cuts, etc are part of that, its the world we live in.
 
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Sirwalterraleigh

Premium Member
Nobody is saying there aren’t other nice Disney resorts, there obviously are. That doesn’t change the fact that the product they offer in Hawaii is superior to any other hotel they currently operate. If you haven’t been there and stayed there than you can’t possibly understand.

Point is that DCL and Aulani are some of the highest quality offerings the company has currently, and they truly are representative of what Disney used to be. Are they expensive, yes, but so is WDW. When compared to the costs associated with a WDW vacation, the service, amenities, and quality of DCL and Aulani make them both a superior value.
I think they won’t be building any aulanis again. You’ll get more bay lakes and Barbados villas.

And that kinda torpedoes the argument.

Dcl is expensive because of limited supply. That’s a smart move. But it doesn’t mean the price is because of service. People REALLY need to go on the modern upscale competitors with their new fleets to make the proper comparison...because they are still usually cheaper. I’m not talking the carnival triumph.

I don’t typically go on dcl forums...but it came up here. People can enjoy what they enjoy.
 

Giss Neric

Well-Known Member
I don't personally, but I've learned never to call a tech company a fad. Also considered fads at one point: Facebook, Twitter, Amazon, YouTube, Instagram, Snapchat. It may be a fad, but it may not.



Maybe he doesn't want the CEO role... Maybe he's more interested in parks as that's where he's spent a good deal of time and he seems to really enjoy it.
Those you mentioned are social media mediums. TikTok is for young people who dance and do crazy stuff to attract attention.
 

lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
I know your feelings about Iger from other threads, so to each their own. I recommend people pick up a book and read from the horse's mouth as well. My views changed when I read his most recent book. I understand that he will make his tenor sound as shiney as possible but there are some great points made, along with some interesting things that happened in his time there.

As long as Disney stock trades on Wall Street, it really doesn't matter who is sitting in that CEO seat, shareholders will always be the prevailing voice. So yes desert parties, budget cuts, etc are part of that, its the world we live in.
The Disney parks have been a profitable enterprise since the 1950s. Iger was not forced to do anything because “business” or the stockholders. He chose to maintain the Pressler model and acted out of his own personal disinterest. The nondescript coaster themed like India or whatever was a better return on investment than what he initiated afterwards.
 

Sirwalterraleigh

Premium Member
I know your feelings about Iger from other threads, so to each their own. I recommend people pick up a book and read from the horse's mouth as well. My views changed when I read his most recent book. I understand that he will make his tenor sound as shiney as possible but there are some great points made, along with some interesting things that happened in his time there.

As long as Disney stock trades on Wall Street, it really doesn't matter who is sitting in that CEO seat, shareholders will always be the prevailing voice. So yes desert parties, budget cuts, etc are part of that, its the world we live in.
Wait....you’re presenting his retirement biography as definitive fact?!?

I’ll fedex you my copy of “Work in Progress” if you want to become an Eisner expert too 😳
 

TJ Vazquez

Premium Member
In the Parks
No
Wait....you’re presenting his retirement biography as definitive fact?!?

I’ll fedex you my copy of “Work in Progress” if you want to become an Eisner expert too 😳
This isn't a knock at you, but when did we assume everyone that writes a biography is a liar? This society that we live in is pretty grim if we think everyone is a liar even when facts are presented. Actual facts, not assumptions or inklings.

I'll ask you and anyone else who thrashes his tenure as CEO, did you at least give the time of day to read his book before you rip it apart?
 

peter11435

Well-Known Member
I think they won’t be building any aulanis again. You’ll get more bay lakes and Barbados villas.

And that kinda torpedoes the argument.

Dcl is expensive because of limited supply. That’s a smart move. But it doesn’t mean the price is because of service. People REALLY need to go on the modern upscale competitors with their new fleets to make the proper comparison...because they are still usually cheaper. I’m not talking the carnival triumph.

I don’t typically go on dcl forums...but it came up here. People can enjoy what they enjoy.
I think you are intentionally missing the point.

Obviously they won’t be building any more Aulani’s due to financial concerns. That doesn’t torpedo the argument because we aren’t debating the financial success of the property (only you are) we are talking about the quality of the offering. It’s the physical facility that makes Aulani superior, it’s the operation and service. While Aulani won’t be built again, the operational standards could and should be applied elsewhere.

DCL is expensive because of limited supply and the Disney name. I’m not comparing DCL to other cruise lines, I’m company it to other Disney offerings. Everything Disney is expensive.
 

Sirwalterraleigh

Premium Member
This isn't a knock at you, but when did we assume everyone that writes a biography is a liar? This society that we live in is pretty grim if we think everyone is a liar even when facts are presented. Actual facts, not assumptions or inklings.

I'll ask you and anyone else who thrashes his tenure as CEO, did you at least give the time of day to read his book before you rip it apart?
I don’t assume they’re a “liar”...I do assume it’s from their perspective.
Because it is. That’s how books work.

This doesn’t need to be debated. It’s black and white.
 

TJ Vazquez

Premium Member
In the Parks
No
Why do I need to read his book when I followed his career in real time? He may not have been as public as Eisner but he wasn't a hermit.
The problem with that sentence is that you assume that people have a negative view of his tenure, it's quite the opposite and you're in the very minority of your stance on him, which is your right. Parks are certainly a large part of the pie, but not the whole pie.
 

Doberge

Active Member
Vahle's only been over Signature Services since 2018 or so, so what's his relationship to Aulani?

I don't know what to think about Vahle. He took over services in 2018 that were largely already well run. I'm unsure what he actually did, what his "stamp" really was. The cruise ships were already in planning pipeline. Maybe Riviera? But I'm unsure that the tower with Grand Florifian-esque prices is necessarily a positive. The best I understand about Vahle is that he kept the train well on the tracks. WDW is more off-track currently so Vahle's going to need to flex some real skill. Has he shown an ability to lead change? I'm unsure and defer to you experts.
 

Sirwalterraleigh

Premium Member
Vahle's only been over Signature Services since 2018 or so, so what's his relationship to Aulani?

I don't know what to think about Vahle. He took over services in 2018 that were largely already well run. I'm unsure what he actually did, what his "stamp" really was. The cruise ships were already in planning pipeline. Maybe Riviera? But I'm unsure that the tower with Grand Florifian-esque prices is necessarily a positive. The best I understand about Vahle is that he kept the train well on the tracks. WDW is more off-track currently so Vahle's going to need to flex some real skill. Has he shown an ability to lead change? I'm unsure and defer to you experts.
The only thing going on since 2018 are the preplanned ships under construction, the preplanned Caribbean project, and the dirt moving around fort wilderness.

Maybe...maybe the Star Wars thing??
 

Sirwalterraleigh

Premium Member
Why do I need to read his book when I followed his career in real time? He may not have been as public as Eisner but he wasn't a hermit.
You don’t...

I didn’t know business leaders were allowed “definitive” control over what they say they did. I thought that’s why there were analysts in the first place: to tell them how they did?

Jack Welch spent 20 years doing books and and self help tapes in retirement about how to “effectively motivate” employees...

He laid off 176,000 people in middle class or above jobs that never returned. Neutron Jack then tried to tell people how to make their workers happy 😳

And I’m not saying I completely disagreed with him...I’m just saying the truth is usually in the eye of the beholder...not the presenter.
 
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DDLand

Well-Known Member
I know your feelings about Iger from other threads, so to each their own. I recommend people pick up a book and read from the horse's mouth as well. My views changed when I read his most recent book. I understand that he will make his tenor sound as shiney as possible but there are some great points made, along with some interesting things that happened in his time there.

As long as Disney stock trades on Wall Street, it really doesn't matter who is sitting in that CEO seat, shareholders will always be the prevailing voice. So yes desert parties, budget cuts, etc are part of that, its the world we live in.
So how does Bob Iger see the parks when he goes?

I go there and I marvel at how many people are there having the time of their lives. You just get the sense that in a world that can at times feel dark and as sinister as it is, these are people that have escaped all of that. They have spent time and good money, I will say, to provide themselves and their friends, their family, their loved ones, an experience that not only is going to make them feel good, but that they’re going to remember forever.

“Good money” indeed. That may be the only true thing in he says. Do you notice that the premise of this vacuous quote is his shock and “marvel” at people liking Disney parks? He also indulges in a classic trope about theme parks being meaningless escapes. Instead of being great stories that can educate and provide hope, theme parks are about “escape.” Nice.

What about his favorite ride?


“I happen to love Pirates [of the Caribbean]. It was the last attraction Walt was really involved in creating. He died just before it opened. And you go and you think, this is just silly, but it’s great.”

Notice how this is actually a jab. Of course he goes and thinks “this is just silly...” He subtly slams Walt Disney’s creation.

“You look at Main Street and you look at kids meeting Mickey. I love it because of what it means to people. I don’t go thinking, “Wow, look what we’re charging for these churros. Isn’t that great?””

Notice he doesn’t say he likes it. No, he likes it because “people” like it. Also, the fact he brings up the churro price means he does think about churro price. Which is odd.

How do Iger and his family experience the parks? Do they wait in line like all of us?

“It’s different for them, I will admit. They don’t wait in line.”

Nice.

How does Iger view other classic Disney attractions?

”The acquisition of these brands and the creation of intellectual property behind them have had a tremendous impact on growing our returns at the parks. When you have Star Wars to market at the parks...Avatar is a good example, Cars Land, we’re building a Frozen land in [Hong Kong, Tokyo, and Paris parks], the interest among the potential audience is higher. It’s not like, “Well, I’m going to ride some nondescript named coaster somewhere that maybe is like, maybe is in India or whatever.” No, you’re going to Arendelle and you’re going to experience Frozen with Anna and Elsa. Or you’re going to fly a banshee into Pandora. Go to Cars Land. We built Radiator Springs. You’re with the characters in that town.

....

People are coming not just to visit a theme park, they’re coming to experience the stories and the characters, the places, that were part of the movies they loved.”

Not just to a theme park. Who would want to go to just a theme park? He slams Expedition Everest and praises Frozen Ever After.

This disdain for theme parks follows to Bob Chapek.

“And that’s why we have a franchise orientation, and frankly, that’s why the Walt Disney Co. far and away outperforms all of our peers.””

What a sad reason to be “outperform.” Not because of storytelling or service. The cast member and imagineering organizations have been poorly managed and gutted. Things like value or creating a great experience don’t matter. That was how Disney used to differentiate their products. Now they create attractions like Alien Swirling Saucers. Any attraction with a superficial tie to a franchise is seen as an acceptable “Disney” ride.

These guys are maddeningly frustrating.
 

HauntedPirate

Sheltered-at-home Park nostalgist
Premium Member
Why do I need to read his book when I followed his career in real time? He may not have been as public as Eisner but he wasn't a hermit.
Well, to be honest, the two 3x5 index cards his book could should have encompassed is a quick read. "Buy stuff". "Charge higher and higher prices". "Cut costs". "Brand everything". There were a few more things, but you get the point. ;)

Can't say I'm terribly surprised by Mr. D'Amaro being promoted. The whole Iger/Chapek/Who's our CEO? kerfuffle really just accelerated the timelime. Hopefully he can bring what appears to be a genuine enthusiasm for the parks and caring for CMs to a higher level and spread it throughout the entire division.

I do wonder just what in the blue blazes Kevin Meyer was thinking. TikTok? Was he really that desperate to leave?
 

Sirwalterraleigh

Premium Member
So how does Bob Iger see the parks when he goes?

I go there and I marvel at how many people are there having the time of their lives. You just get the sense that in a world that can at times feel dark and as sinister as it is, these are people that have escaped all of that. They have spent time and good money, I will say, to provide themselves and their friends, their family, their loved ones, an experience that not only is going to make them feel good, but that they’re going to remember forever.

“Good money” indeed. That may be the only true thing in he says. Do you notice that the premise of this vacuous quote is his shock and “marvel” at people liking Disney parks? He also indulges in a classic trope about theme parks being meaningless escapes. Instead of being great stories that can educate and provide hope, theme parks are about “escape.” Nice.

What about his favorite ride?


“I happen to love Pirates [of the Caribbean]. It was the last attraction Walt was really involved in creating. He died just before it opened. And you go and you think, this is just silly, but it’s great.”

Notice how this is actually a jab. Of course he goes and thinks “this is just silly...” He subtly slams Walt Disney’s creation.

“You look at Main Street and you look at kids meeting Mickey. I love it because of what it means to people. I don’t go thinking, “Wow, look what we’re charging for these churros. Isn’t that great?””

Notice he doesn’t say he likes it. No, he likes it because “people” like it. Also, the fact he brings up the churro price means he does think about churro price. Which is odd.

How do Iger and his family experience the parks? Do they wait in line like all of us?

“It’s different for them, I will admit. They don’t wait in line.”

Nice.

How does Iger view other classic Disney attractions?

”The acquisition of these brands and the creation of intellectual property behind them have had a tremendous impact on growing our returns at the parks. When you have Star Wars to market at the parks...Avatar is a good example, Cars Land, we’re building a Frozen land in [Hong Kong, Tokyo, and Paris parks], the interest among the potential audience is higher. It’s not like, “Well, I’m going to ride some nondescript named coaster somewhere that maybe is like, maybe is in India or whatever.” No, you’re going to Arendelle and you’re going to experience Frozen with Anna and Elsa. Or you’re going to fly a banshee into Pandora. Go to Cars Land. We built Radiator Springs. You’re with the characters in that town.

....

People are coming not just to visit a theme park, they’re coming to experience the stories and the characters, the places, that were part of the movies they loved.”

Not just to a theme park. Who would want to go to just a theme park? He slams Expedition Everest and praises Frozen Ever After.

This disdain for theme parks follows to Bob Chapek.

“And that’s why we have a franchise orientation, and frankly, that’s why the Walt Disney Co. far and away outperforms all of our peers.””

What a sad reason to be “outperform.” Not because of storytelling or service. The cast member and imagineering organizations have been poorly managed and gutted. Things like value or creating a great experience don’t matter. That was how Disney used to differentiate their products. Now they create attractions like Alien Swirling Saucers. Any attraction with a superficial tie to a franchise is seen as an acceptable “Disney” ride.

These guys are maddeningly frustrating.
...today’s winner
 

HauntedPirate

Sheltered-at-home Park nostalgist
Premium Member
So how does Bob Iger see the parks when he goes?

I go there and I marvel at how many people are there having the time of their lives. You just get the sense that in a world that can at times feel dark and as sinister as it is, these are people that have escaped all of that. They have spent time and good money, I will say, to provide themselves and their friends, their family, their loved ones, an experience that not only is going to make them feel good, but that they’re going to remember forever.

“Good money” indeed. That may be the only true thing in he says. Do you notice that the premise of this vacuous quote is his shock and “marvel” at people liking Disney parks? He also indulges in a classic trope about theme parks being meaningless escapes. Instead of being great stories that can educate and provide hope, theme parks are about “escape.” Nice.

What about his favorite ride?


“I happen to love Pirates [of the Caribbean]. It was the last attraction Walt was really involved in creating. He died just before it opened. And you go and you think, this is just silly, but it’s great.”

Notice how this is actually a jab. Of course he goes and thinks “this is just silly...” He subtly slams Walt Disney’s creation.

“You look at Main Street and you look at kids meeting Mickey. I love it because of what it means to people. I don’t go thinking, “Wow, look what we’re charging for these churros. Isn’t that great?””

Notice he doesn’t say he likes it. No, he likes it because “people” like it. Also, the fact he brings up the churro price means he does think about churro price. Which is odd.

How do Iger and his family experience the parks? Do they wait in line like all of us?

“It’s different for them, I will admit. They don’t wait in line.”

Nice.

How does Iger view other classic Disney attractions?

”The acquisition of these brands and the creation of intellectual property behind them have had a tremendous impact on growing our returns at the parks. When you have Star Wars to market at the parks...Avatar is a good example, Cars Land, we’re building a Frozen land in [Hong Kong, Tokyo, and Paris parks], the interest among the potential audience is higher. It’s not like, “Well, I’m going to ride some nondescript named coaster somewhere that maybe is like, maybe is in India or whatever.” No, you’re going to Arendelle and you’re going to experience Frozen with Anna and Elsa. Or you’re going to fly a banshee into Pandora. Go to Cars Land. We built Radiator Springs. You’re with the characters in that town.

....

People are coming not just to visit a theme park, they’re coming to experience the stories and the characters, the places, that were part of the movies they loved.”

Not just to a theme park. Who would want to go to just a theme park? He slams Expedition Everest and praises Frozen Ever After.

This disdain for theme parks follows to Bob Chapek.

“And that’s why we have a franchise orientation, and frankly, that’s why the Walt Disney Co. far and away outperforms all of our peers.””

What a sad reason to be “outperform.” Not because of storytelling or service. The cast member and imagineering organizations have been poorly managed and gutted. Things like value or creating a great experience don’t matter. That was how Disney used to differentiate their products. Now they create attractions like Alien Swirling Saucers. Any attraction with a superficial tie to a franchise is seen as an acceptable “Disney” ride.

These guys are maddeningly frustrating.
Quoting for posterity, because this is good.

I would add one thing to your last paragraph. The reason TWDC outperforms is because of the foundation laid 60+ years ago of quality storytelling, theming, plus a superior experience and level of service, not because of a catalog of IPs.
 
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