News Disney Has Purchased Approximately 235 Acres of Land

Steph15251

Well-Known Member
Many of the DL rides that are duplicates in WDW were distributed to four parks instead of crowded into one. Right now, counting just rides (and not other attractions like shows, parades, fireworks, streetmosphere, etc...) DL & DCA have almost exactly has many rides as all of WDW.
Which is why I hope they keep on adding rides to WDW after 2021/2022 .
 

spock8113

Active Member
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It seems some of the meticulous maps calculating park area include parking areas and bodies of useless water.
How about number of rides, number of food stands/restaurants and shops. For AK, the zoo could be one ride, etc.
My fifth gate, RetroDisney©, where all the rides from the past reside as they are replaced with updates in the existing parks.
DLR is four days easy, one day for each park without going to either water park.
 

MisterPenguin

President of Animal Kingdom
Premium Member
It seems some of the meticulous maps calculating park area include parking areas and bodies of useless water.
How about number of rides, number of food stands/restaurants and shops. For AK, the zoo could be one ride, etc.
My fifth gate, RetroDisney©, where all the rides from the past reside as they are replaced with updates in the existing parks.
DLR is four days easy, one day for each park without going to either water park.
Worst. Haiku. Ever.
 

homerdance

Well-Known Member
This seems like a relevant story to this discussion:

"Finger would not confirm Centex as the buyer of the 349-acre site. However, on Wednesday Reedy Creek supervisors discussed that the property was going to Centex. "

 

ABQ

Well-Known Member
This seems like a relevant story to this discussion:

"Finger would not confirm Centex as the buyer of the 349-acre site. However, on Wednesday Reedy Creek supervisors discussed that the property was going to Centex. "

That article is 13 years old.
 

Steph15251

Well-Known Member
This seems like a relevant story to this discussion:

"Finger would not confirm Centex as the buyer of the 349-acre site. However, on Wednesday Reedy Creek supervisors discussed that the property was going to Centex. "

And they started to already build on this land since it was from 2006 but it did take along time.
 

BoarderPhreak

Well-Known Member
Disney should keep buying any and every piece of land that's touching the property that could push the border farther out, whenever it becomes available. Continue Walt's good work... 🤔

Maybe snap up Sea World when it goes under. 😆
 

Victor Kelly

Well-Known Member
While it's true that DL didn't add any meaningful capacity from 2008 to 2018, much of the attendance growth can be linked to a perfect storm of events in that period that wouldn't produce similar results in WDW.

2008 was right around the time that DLR started offering monthly payments on annual passes for local residents. This also coincided with the Great Recession, with 15 million residents of the greater southern California region who were looking for more-modest staycations rather than big-budget trips afar. This paired with an increase in the "coolness" of DL among the general population, alongside the rise of social media and the flaunting that goes along with it. The result was an attendance boom that bucked all traditional trends and conventional wisdom, with APs choking the resort at unexpected times: evenings in October are now more crowded than summer weekends.

It also didn't hurt that DL's sister park 100 yards across the Esplanade had a steady stream of additions (of varying degrees of quality) during that period, including an unprecedented relaunch of the park in 2012.

DL has always relied heavily on locals, but in the past 10 years the focus has shifted from locals who visit every couple years to regulars who visit several times per year. Instead of a world-class destination, in a lot of ways it has devolved into a local hangout spot, like shopping malls in the 80's and 90's. WDW, on the other hand, relies heavily on long-distance travelers who may only make the pilgrimage once or twice per generation; while these guests may not be as fickle regarding individual attractions and experiences, they're much more difficult to attract in the first place, particularly during a slow economy.


That said, I don't disagree with your conclusion that MK can and should add more capacity at a fairly modest cost (even with WDI's bloated budgets) to help distribute the crowds better. MK will always be the most-visited park in WDW; there's no reason that the park's capacity should be as low as it is. It simply needs more of everything to help absorb the crowds out of the walkways and into other facilities. The MyMagic+ system has only served to exacerbate the park's existing problems, while pulling away funding that could have been used to help mitigate them.
Problem is when they add capacity like more attractiond they also up the crowd limits. Hence they negate the solution they just initiated.
 

tirian

Well-Known Member
I don't see how this is an issue since the parks rarely reach capacity as it is.
It's easy to not hit capacity when you keep increasing the limit....
The MK and Epcot had higher capacities in the late 80s. Both parks featured additional shows and rides that swallowed crowds of guests; Epcot actually had two extra pavilions plus the ImageWorks, and the entire park was open rope drop to closing.
 

Rich Brownn

Well-Known Member
The MK and Epcot had higher capacities in the late 80s. Both parks featured additional shows and rides that swallowed crowds of guests; Epcot actually had two extra pavilions plus the ImageWorks, and the entire park was open rope drop to closing.
The had the ability to have more things to do, but the cutoff for when the close the gates at the MK is much higher than it was in the 80s
 

tirian

Well-Known Member
The had the ability to have more things to do, but the cutoff for when the close the gates at the MK is much higher than it was in the 80s
Oh yeah, definitely! According to a coworker who did a CP in the ‘90s, 45k was considered busy and called for full operations. Today that’s called a moderate crowd.

On my most recent WDW trip last fall, Epcot opened on a Sunday morning of F&W with just eight operational ticket readers—four stations total. Four. On a Sunday. The entrance queue stretched up the monorail ramp. I didn’t bother going to GR because several leaders were already standing in the front entrance, watching the whole thing.

The company clearly doesn’t care about guest experience because it’s cutting staff while raising prices to show good quarterly numbers.
 

tirian

Well-Known Member
A few months ago, Disney mentioned it would have to purchase some land to offset the new construction projects and maintain its “natural reserve” percentage. I forgot when they said it, but we knew about this in advance. :)
 
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