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Coronavirus and Walt Disney World general discussion

Disstevefan1

Well-Known Member
I think that is the whole point. Obesity is defined as a BMI over 30 and obesity would be listed as a comorbidity. Almost half of US adults also have high blood pressure, also a comorbidity. These are some of the reasons 94% of Covid deaths had a comorbidity listed and a lot had more than one.

Agreed, BMI is a joke and alone should never be considered a comorbidity. In my opinion, slightly high BP alone shouldn’t be considered a comorbidity either.

To be honest, I don’t trust any of the numbers at this point.... I don’t know what to believe on either side of the debate at this point.
 

DisneyDebRob

Well-Known Member
More positive news on a vaccine.

The phase 3 one that just started with astra-zeneca says first results should be here by thanksgiving. If all goes well I’m guessing early next year, as many scientists have been saying for months, it could be available.
 

DisneyCane

Well-Known Member
We shut down because of the point we are at in technology. If as a unified world we were able to roll out tests back in March we never would have shut down. We would have low the death rate was and how it was targeting the elderly. We would have locked the elderly down for a few months and all of this would have run its course.
From whatever data was coming out of China and then good data from Italy very early on, it was crystal clear that the elderly were, far and away, the most vulnerable. Testing capacity wasn't required to implement a strategy of locking down the elderly in March.
 

MisterPenguin

Rumormonger
Premium Member

MisterPenguin

Rumormonger
Premium Member
That big data dump actually brought positivity level down a tenth of a percent!

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GoofGoof

Premium Member
The headline does not match the actual story. Interesting how words are used to present a particular point of view in a particular way. Its always in the details. The sooner the U.S. can develop a vaccine, the sooner the world will benefit (not just a few power hungry countries) and the sooner everyone can get back to enjoying their time at the Disney properties.
The story isn’t very controversial or even huge news. More than 150 countries are setting up the COVID-19 Vaccines Global Access Facility, or COVAX. An official Whitehouse spokesperson said the US will not join COVAX. That’s a fact. It’s not fake news and it’s not political. It’s also not surprising since the US already announced they are withdrawing from the WHO which COVAX is directly linked to. The US approach has been to directly contract with multiple vaccine developers. If one of those hit, the US will already have doses purchased. So far so good on the front runners and if none of the, work there are a dozen more in the pipeline.
 

GoofGoof

Premium Member
Agreed, BMI is a joke and alone should never be considered a comorbidity. In my opinion, slightly high BP alone shouldn’t be considered a comorbidity either.

To be honest, I don’t trust any of the numbers at this point.... I don’t know what to believe on either side of the debate at this point.
There’s not really much of a controversy here. Most people probably never knew what went on a death certificate before now. Comorbidities are nothing new and common is most deaths from illness. The numbers reported for deaths from a disease are always more of an estimate than a solid number. That’s why if you google worldwide deaths from H1N1 a lot of places give a range vs a firm number. Reporting isn’t always 100% accurate. It’s just that now in our politically charged environment everyone is looking for a darker ulterior motive to errors or grey areas. I think in the vast majority of cases the people in charge of reporting are doing the best they can and are not intentionally reporting false numbers.
 

GoofGoof

Premium Member
Actually it is more positive news that if you have already had the virus the likelihood that you will get it again is low. So even if a vaccine doesn't pan out herd immunity will work...
It’s too early to tell, but they are saying at least 4 months out that the anti-bodies still work. No telling if that means lifelong immunity or not but it could. Obviously if a vaccine never works then that’s best case scenario.

If antibodies are lifelong then in that case a single vaccination would be all that was needed. If there are some mutations they could end up with an annual vaccination like the flu shot or a vaccine with boosters every 5 to 10 years. All possibilities. A vaccine is still our fastest way to a return to normal life and a reboot of the economy.
 

Heppenheimer

Well-Known Member
It’s too early to tell, but they are saying at least 4 months out that the anti-bodies still work. No telling if that means lifelong immunity or not but it could. Obviously if a vaccine never works then that’s best case scenario.

If antibodies are lifelong then in that case a single vaccination would be all that was needed. If there are some mutations they could end up with an annual vaccination like the flu shot or a vaccine with boosters every 5 to 10 years. All possibilities. A vaccine is still our fastest way to a return to normal life and a reboot of the economy.
Just note though, that there's no correlation between the duration of antibodies induced by the natural infection and those from a vaccine. The two are completely independent. We probably won't know the optimal frequency of boosters, if needed, for several years. This will be determined by the post-marketing studies.
 

Disstevefan1

Well-Known Member
There’s not really much of a controversy here. Most people probably never knew what went on a death certificate before now. Comorbidities are nothing new and common is most deaths from illness. The numbers reported for deaths from a disease are always more of an estimate than a solid number. That’s why if you google worldwide deaths from H1N1 a lot of places give a range vs a firm number. Reporting isn’t always 100% accurate. It’s just that now in our politically charged environment everyone is looking for a darker ulterior motive to errors or grey areas. I think in the vast majority of cases the people in charge of reporting are doing the best they can and are not intentionally reporting false numbers.

I do not think there are intentional reporting errors, I am sure there is a lot of human error, and I think there may be some over reporting of positive cases and CCP virus deaths to be on the safe side as to not under report positive cases and CCP virus deaths.
 

wdwmagic

Administrator
Moderator
I do not think there are intentional reporting errors, I am sure there is a lot of human error, and I think there may be some over reporting of positive cases and CCP virus deaths to be on the safe side as to not under report positive cases and CCP virus deaths.
Would you please refer to the virus in non-political terms - it encourages a heated political argument which is not for this section. Covid-19 would be preferable.
 

jkh36619

Well-Known Member
More positive news on a vaccine.


ha. They seem to be so back and forth on this. Kinda reminds me of eggs are bad for you, wait. no they aren't. Opps, yes they are, or are they?
 

GoofGoof

Premium Member
ha. They seem to be so back and forth on this. Kinda reminds me of eggs are bad for you, wait. no they aren't. Opps, yes they are, or are they?
Agreed. It shows how little we actually know about this virus and even the stuff we think we know we might not be right.

For the record I always ate eggs because I like them. I just happened to fall on the right side of the healthy debate. Plus I used indisputable logic...if chicken is a healthy meat to eat how can eating an unborn chicken be unhealthy?
 

DisneyCane

Well-Known Member
Yes, but I think the overall point, that antibody immunity is only finite, stands.

Again, T-Cell immunity is where it's at ;)
I think the big question is, after somebody's antibody immunity wears off, is their immune system better equipped to fight off the virus in the future? Maybe not be "immune" but if you had a mild case the first time, would you have an asymptomatic case in two years?

That article also has good information regarding the percentage of asymptomatic cases (33% in the study) and the infection fatality rate (0.3% in the study). I'd like to see the IFR broken down by age group.
 

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