Wish (Walt Disney Animation - November 2023)

Jedijax719

Well-Known Member
A common complaint in negative reviews is, indeed, "There are no stakes to the story." The people of Rosas supposedly have a core part of their being taken from them, but they seem happy enough and the kingdom is thriving. Since there's not a pressing need to save them until after Asha's actions drive the King to extreme evil measures, and the story isn't about her making up for endangering them, any emotional torque comes from interpersonal relationships and pretty much none of the reviewers cite those as a memorable element of the film, the way people loved Anna and Elsa's relationship or the family ties in Encanto.
Well I will say that a wish is a wish and, while sometimes inspirational, they are often times not a necessity for a happy life unless that wish is a matter of life and death. In that case, that gets a bit to gloomy and morbid for a kid's animated movie. So, yeah, I can understand that being a complaint. But is it THE complaint? That gets a bit into the meta of the story. Does a movie warrant less than a 50% because of meta aspects? Well, an A- would say otherwise. Not sure how I would place a 82 audience score. It's good, but is it the disparity from the critics enough to propel it?

Truth is the more abstract indie type films critics see and review, the less they are going to adhere to more mainstream material. The indie stuff becomes intertwined in their blood and soul. Nothing wrong with that as long as the public can see through it and not place a whole lot of value on how critics score mainstream films.
 

Disney Analyst

Well-Known Member
Well I will say that a wish is a wish and, while sometimes inspirational, they are often times not a necessity for a happy life unless that wish is a matter of life and death. In that case, that gets a bit to gloomy and morbid for a kid's animated movie. So, yeah, I can understand that being a complaint. But is it THE complaint? That gets a bit into the meta of the story. Does a movie warrant less than a 50% because of meta aspects? Well, an A- would say otherwise. Not sure how I would place a 82 audience score. It's good, but is it the disparity from the critics enough to propel it?

Truth is the more abstract indie type films critics see and review, the less they are going to adhere to more mainstream material. The indie stuff becomes intertwined in their blood and soul. Nothing wrong with that as long as the public can see through it and not place a whole lot of value on how critics score mainstream films.

I need to add, seeing some of the reviews, it seems like a lot of critics have become extra cynical, and have little room in their sphere for simple fun.

I mean, it seems to them the various nods to Disney films is the most dastardly thing Disney has ever done.
 

Advisable Joseph

Active Member
What concerns me is denying that Wish looks like a moving watercolor storybook.

By way of contrast, does this from Puss in Boots: the Last Wish look like watercolor, as I think people claim?


Puss_in_Boots_The_Last_Wish_Still_02.jpg


Hi-Res view: https://static.wikia.nocookie.net/shrek/images/f/f2/Puss_in_Boots_The_Last_Wish_Still_02.jpg

The lo-res might look kinda watercolor in an unwelcome way.

They're not talking about the short anime sequences, are they?
 
Last edited:

Disney Irish

Premium Member
That’s great.

For me it’s all about money.

I’m tired of the parks being run into the ground to help finance all the other company failures.
Yeah.... hate to break it to you but that's not going to change even if Studios was doing well. Just look back even as recent as 2018 and 2019 when Studios could almost do no wrong for evidence of that.

Parks and by extension any other part of the company doing well will always help fund anything lagging, that is just how corporations work. Only way that will ever change for Parks is if its spun-off to its own company, but then you don't have the corporate umbrella with deep pockets. But that is a longer discussion with its own set a problems best not had here.
 

Willmark

Well-Known Member
Did you read the article? The movie about a short french guy with cold hands made more money than Wish.
As a point of order, technically Napoleon wasn’t French, his family was Italian in origin. Corisca was ceded to France when he was one years old.

Not sure about the hands though.
 

Sir_Cliff

Well-Known Member
I am sure we'll see some love stories again in the future, including (probably not for another decade at least) a gay love story, which would make me very happy.
To be honest, I'm happy that romantic love hasn't been the motivating factor for heroes in recent films, but then I think my favourite classics were mostly films like Pinocchio, Alice, and Jungle Book where that was also the case. I would also agree that it is still a part of the films; for example, it was played to some comic effect in Encanto with Dolores pining after Mariano, who was a hopeless romantic himself.

I don't have kids and can only really go off what I enjoyed as a child, but it surprised me during the 1990s that Disney seemed to feel what kids wanted more than anything in their animated features was a love story!
 

Miss Rori

Active Member
I need to add, seeing some of the reviews, it seems like a lot of critics have become extra cynical, and have little room in their sphere for simple fun.

I mean, it seems to them the various nods to Disney films is the most dastardly thing Disney has ever done.
Well, the complaints about the references boil down to some specific issues:
1) They are sometimes so obvious and foregrounded they become a distraction from the story the movie is telling, or even work against it; i.e. the Teens being Seven Dwarfs analogues is a cute visual, but they don't get developed as actual, unique characters or even get that much to do. (It probably would have worked better if they were subtler as in Enchanted or more of a self-parody/deconstruction.)
2) As with films like The Flash or Space Jam: A New Legacy, they often seem to make it a giant commercial for old Disney movies. If the critics are being cynical, well, so is the movie.
3) It's an emotional crutch -- hoping that the audience's assumed nostalgia for older films and resultant delight to spot the references makes up for this story's failures.

(Also, I read that one of the wishes is for two bratty kids is to get a nanny, ala Mary Poppins. But if people make their wishes when they're 18...how early are people getting married in Rosas? Also, how is that wish, or having "hair down to your feet", a reflection of someone's soul?)
 
Last edited:

Farerb

Active Member
To be honest, I'm happy that romantic love hasn't been the motivating factor for heroes in recent films, but then I think my favourite classics were mostly films like Pinocchio, Alice, and Jungle Book where that was also the case. I would also agree that it is still a part of the films; for example, it was played to some comic effect in Encanto with Dolores pining after Mariano, who was a hopeless romantic himself.

I don't have kids and can only really go off what I enjoyed as a child, but it surprised me during the 1990s that Disney seemed to feel what kids wanted more than anything in their animated features was a love story!
It's because they realized that many of the audience for The Little Mermaid were couples, and they treated the movies as "date movies".
 

LittleBuford

Well-Known Member
To be honest, I'm happy that romantic love hasn't been the motivating factor for heroes in recent films, but then I think my favourite classics were mostly films like Pinocchio, Alice, and Jungle Book where that was also the case. I would also agree that it is still a part of the films; for example, it was played to some comic effect in Encanto with Dolores pining after Mariano, who was a hopeless romantic himself.

I don't have kids and can only really go off what I enjoyed as a child, but it surprised me during the 1990s that Disney seemed to feel what kids wanted more than anything in their animated features was a love story!
For whatever reason, the love stories always resonated with me as a child, which is why I wouldn’t mind seeing more of them. That said, Pinocchio and Alice in Wonderland were among my favourites too, so I totally get what you’re saying.
 

Disstevefan1

Well-Known Member
Cinemascore is out. Not bad, but not great. Still surprised at how comparatively well Trolls 3 is received by audiences and critics alike. Did not expect that.

View attachment 755213
Let us all give thanks for TWDC created a NEW STORY that WILL WIN at the box office and hopefully make them STOP the awful live action REWRITES they have been making.

Although, having said that, I am looking forward to the live action remake of Moana because the Rock.😉
 

Miss Rori

Active Member
Watching the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade and wow, Disney dropped the ball on promoting this movie. The float representing the Disney Treasure ship was gorgeous and had a great original musical number with a fun mix of characters (mostly Disney/Pixar, but Spider-Man and Black Panther had a cameo)...but no Asha or Magnifico, not even a mention of the movie. They didn't provide a balloon either. Migration and Leo warranted balloons and Wonka has a float. They did run a commercial, but every vaguely family-friendly movie (including streaming exclusive titles) is getting one. It's weird Disney didn't go all out given it is the 100th (and a lot of anniversaries were getting shout-outs).
 

FettFan

Well-Known Member
Well, the complaints about the references boil down to some specific issues:
1) They are sometimes so obvious and foregrounded they become a distraction from the story the movie is telling, or even work against it; i.e. the Teens being Seven Dwarfs analogues is a cute visual, but they don't get developed as actual, unique characters or even get that much to do. (It probably would have worked better if they were subtler as in Enchanted or more of a self-parody/deconstruction.)
2) As with films like The Flash or Space Jam: A New Legacy, they often seem to make it a giant commercial for old Disney movies. If the critics are being cynical, well, so is the movie.
3) It's an emotional crutch -- hoping that the audience's assumed nostalgia for older films and resultant delight to spot the references makes up for this story's failures.

(Also, I read that one of the wishes is for two bratty kids is to get a nanny, ala Mary Poppins. But if people make their wishes when they're 18...how early are people getting married in Rosas? Also, how is that wish, or having "hair down to your feet", a reflection of someone's soul?)

Looks like you also watched Jeremy Jahns’ review.
 

Ghost93

Well-Known Member
I don't think this is the case. Straight romance is still very much featured in the films (Strange World, for example, shows the mum and dad doing a cutesy dance in the kitchen and then kissing each other). To my mind, the reason they've moved away from classic love stories—a trend that can be traced back to Frozen—is that they wanted to do something different with their (typically young) female lead characters, who, till that point, almost always ended up in relationships. It's a "girl power" move if anything, and it makes sense when you consider how attitudes in general have shifted since the days when Disney films routinely featured teenage princess brides (and those days were as recent as the '90s).
While I understand the desire not to have romantic relationships define female characters, I DO kinda miss the Disney romances. That's part of why I liked Elemental so much.

If Disney wanted to do a future romance movie, I don't think it would be seen as regressive since Moana, Merida, Raya, Asha and Vaneloppe have all been leading ladies of Disney/Pixar movies without any sort of romance.
 

Register on WDWMAGIC. This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.

Back
Top Bottom