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What will happen when the Skyliner breaks down?

World_Showcase_Lover007

Well-Known Member
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Shouldn't it be "Can I not give genuine feedback?"😜
Why yes.... it should be the way you stated it, of course. Sometimes my “rage” gets the best of me lol, and my proofreading suffers for it. Good catch.
 

mergatroid

Well-Known Member
Peoples reaction to this subject always fascinates me.

There are elevated cable gondolas/lifts that have been operating in nearly 60 countries in virtually every conceivable climate and topographic condition imaginable for decades. Last I read, more than 18 billion people have been transported via some kind of cable lift system system since the early 70's in the US alone.

The number of fatalities in the US since then...less than 20. In spite of this so many people seem to think that Disney will need it's own morgue to deal will all of the casualties from the Skyliner.

You are 5 times more likely to die in elevator than on gondola. Escalators kill 30 people a year in the US alone. Where was all this panic when the Land pavilion opened with 2 escalators and an elevator just feet from each other?
Great post
 

Goofyernmost

Well-Known Member
What happens when the skyliner breaks down??

Based on what I have read on this thread and the other main Gondola thread one of two things are going to happen. 1. everybody dies a miserable death follow by being snack time for the massive amounts of hungry Alligators that Disney has planted there to remove all evidence as to why families never got back home OR 2. Everyone rides them uneventfully for a few minutes to DHS or Epcot and enjoys a fun day in the parks and then rides back to their room in their chosen resort. Number one isn't going to happen mostly because the chance of any disaster happening is slimmer then the chance of someone knocking on my door and giving me a couple million in cash.

Not to worry, if someone does come up to my door with a loose 2 million, I will be sure to alert you so you can avoid the Gondola's of death.
 

piru

New Member
What really fascinates me is that in every WDW forum, no matter what subject it's being discussed, the yeti is always present.
There should be a tribute to the broken yeti. Private event. Win win situation.
 

Kingtut

Well-Known Member
Peoples reaction to this subject always fascinates me.

There are elevated cable gondolas/lifts that have been operating in nearly 60 countries in virtually every conceivable climate and topographic condition imaginable for decades. Last I read, more than 18 billion people have been transported via some kind of cable lift system system since the early 70's in the US alone.

The number of fatalities in the US since then...less than 20. In spite of this so many people seem to think that Disney will need it's own morgue to deal will all of the casualties from the Skyliner.

You are 5 times more likely to die in elevator than on gondola. Escalators kill 30 people a year in the US alone. Where was all this panic when the Land pavilion opened with 2 escalators and an elevator just feet from each other?
I was originally dismissive of the Disney Gondolas of Death predictions, but I have been looking at the Boeing 737 MAX issues and realized that while no single person will design a system in such a way that it's users have a good chance of dying. In today's massive companies with committee after committee after committee - we can end up with decisions where the actual safety is impacted. Not intentionally but in a thousand little cuts where doing it this way is OK because X will cover it. Then the next committee decides that X can be reduced and so on. It's not an evil intent but a result of systems where no single person can fully comprehend the ramifications of each decision- and furthermore no single person knows all of the decisions and trade-offs made during design and implementation.

Boeing would never design a flight system which tried to crash the plane but ..... So Disney would never design a gondola system which would put guests at risk - right?

Perhaps we should be a bit more forgiving when people voice their concerns about potential safety issues.
 
I was originally dismissive of the Disney Gondolas of Death predictions, but I have been looking at the Boeing 737 MAX issues and realized that while no single person will design a system in such a way that it's users have a good chance of dying. In today's massive companies with committee after committee after committee - we can end up with decisions where the actual safety is impacted. Not intentionally but in a thousand little cuts where doing it this way is OK because X will cover it. Then the next committee decides that X can be reduced and so on. It's not an evil intent but a result of systems where no single person can fully comprehend the ramifications of each decision- and furthermore no single person knows all of the decisions and trade-offs made during design and implementation.

Boeing would never design a flight system which tried to crash the plane but ..... So Disney would never design a gondola system which would put guests at risk - right?

Perhaps we should be a bit more forgiving when people voice their concerns about potential safety issues.

The way I understood the Boeing debacle is (and I could be wrong...I'm certain I will be corrected otherwise), the safety feature that would have prevented the crashes was an add-on. That would be like optional doors on a gondola.
 

lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
I was originally dismissive of the Disney Gondolas of Death predictions, but I have been looking at the Boeing 737 MAX issues and realized that while no single person will design a system in such a way that it's users have a good chance of dying. In today's massive companies with committee after committee after committee - we can end up with decisions where the actual safety is impacted. Not intentionally but in a thousand little cuts where doing it this way is OK because X will cover it. Then the next committee decides that X can be reduced and so on. It's not an evil intent but a result of systems where no single person can fully comprehend the ramifications of each decision- and furthermore no single person knows all of the decisions and trade-offs made during design and implementation.

Boeing would never design a flight system which tried to crash the plane but ..... So Disney would never design a gondola system which would put guests at risk - right?

Perhaps we should be a bit more forgiving when people voice their concerns about potential safety issues.
Except that this isn’t a Disney design and many of the concerns are based in willful ignorance.

The way I understood the Boeing debacle is (and I could be wrong...I'm certain I will be corrected otherwise), the safety feature that would have prevented the crashes was an add-on. That would be like optional doors on a gondola.
It was assumed to be an add-on by some because it just didn’t work.
 

larryz

Can't 'Member Anything
Premium Member
It was assumed to be an add-on by some because it just didn’t work.
Boeing CEO was on CBS last night saying "The implementation of that software, we did not do it correctly. Our engineers discovered that."

No, Sherlock, the 300-some-odd passengers and crew who died discovered that. Your engineers are busy scrambling eggs to try and fix it.

And as for "I'd put my family on a 737 MAX without hesitation," I'm guessing his future ex-wife's lawyer will use that in court.
 

Goofyernmost

Well-Known Member
I was originally dismissive of the Disney Gondolas of Death predictions, but I have been looking at the Boeing 737 MAX issues and realized that while no single person will design a system in such a way that it's users have a good chance of dying. In today's massive companies with committee after committee after committee - we can end up with decisions where the actual safety is impacted. Not intentionally but in a thousand little cuts where doing it this way is OK because X will cover it. Then the next committee decides that X can be reduced and so on. It's not an evil intent but a result of systems where no single person can fully comprehend the ramifications of each decision- and furthermore no single person knows all of the decisions and trade-offs made during design and implementation.

Boeing would never design a flight system which tried to crash the plane but ..... So Disney would never design a gondola system which would put guests at risk - right?

Perhaps we should be a bit more forgiving when people voice their concerns about potential safety issues.
As soon as the Gondola's are moving at 35000 feet, don't worry, I will be asking a lot of questions.
 
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