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Rumor Version of MaxPass coming to WDW in May?

peter11435

Well-Known Member
All MaxPass got you is the ability to collect “paper” Fastpass on your phone. You were at very little advantage over those who don’t buy it so I don’t think there was a need to up the price. Things like Universal Express pass that guarantee low waits need higher prices to limit the amount of users. Whereas with MaxPass it didn’t really matter if everyone in the park paid for it, as everyone in the park could collect the same Fastpass at the kiosk.
Correct. Although there were frequently earlier times being distributed through max pass than via paper due to how the system handled cancelled and modified inventory. This also sometimes allowed max pass users to acquire fastpasses after paper tickets had already finished distributing.
 

Touchdown

Well-Known Member
Correct. Although there were frequently earlier times being distributed through max pass than via paper due to how the system handled cancelled and modified inventory. This also sometimes allowed max pass users to acquire fastpasses after paper tickets had already finished distributing.
For those of us savey enough it was a great system. When I rope dropped DL starting 1-2 hours after opening I would start amassing DCA FP for the afternoon, and at about 1-2 pm would waltz over there and ride every FP attraction using FPs for 3 hours (I did cheat and use the SRL at RSR) and riding non FP rides in between. Then by the time I broke for dinner I had done most of the major rides at both parks and I was booking repeat rides on my favorites at DL.
 

Jrb1979

Well-Known Member
I'm still amazed so many like Disney's system at all. I've been to lots of parks the last few years and most have the same system as Universal. No planning involved, ride what you want when you want and the best part, there is no "if everyone has FP nobody has FP" attached to it.

It's great for those who like to ride things multiple times
 

ImperfectPixie

Well-Known Member
I'm still amazed so many like Disney's system at all. I've been to lots of parks the last few years and most have the same system as Universal. No planning involved, ride what you want when you want and the best part, there is no "if everyone has FP nobody has FP" attached to it.

It's great for those who like to ride things multiple times
I despise the FP+ system. We make it work for us, but that doesn't mean I like it.
 

Jon81uk

Well-Known Member
I'm still amazed so many like Disney's system at all. I've been to lots of parks the last few years and most have the same system as Universal. No planning involved, ride what you want when you want and the best part, there is no "if everyone has FP nobody has FP" attached to it.

It's great for those who like to ride things multiple times

Disney’s system is free to all guests and everyone has similar levels of access.
You can get some advantages (60day booking at WDW for resort guests and MaxPass meaning you don’t need to use FP kiosks at DLR) but the main scheme is free with a lot tickets.
Universal, Six Flags etc don’t offer any free virtual queue, only paying to skip the line. That’s the main reason people prefer Disney FastPass, it’s “free”. Other parks you can ride with a lot shorter waits but you’ll be paying a lot more for it.
 

DisneyCane

Well-Known Member
I think the reason the original FP didn't work for Disney is that, for some reason, they thought people would shop and eat while in the virtual queue instead of just get on shorter standby lines and wait in two queues at once.

I'm not sure what the FP+ goal was other than maybe to encourage onsite hotel stays with the extra window. Surely there were cheaper ways to promote onsite stays.

The issue with moving to a paid version (from a guest standpoint) is that in order for it to have any value, it has to be ridiculously priced or extremely limited. If it is not limited by price or inventory availability, then it will not be of benefit and will make the standby lines unacceptable.

As we can see with no FP, even with the COVID capacity restrictions the standby lines are not exactly short so just going to no FP of any kind doesn't help the wait time issue.
 

ImperfectPixie

Well-Known Member
I think the reason the original FP didn't work for Disney is that, for some reason, they thought people would shop and eat while in the virtual queue instead of just get on shorter standby lines and wait in two queues at once.

I'm not sure what the FP+ goal was other than maybe to encourage onsite hotel stays with the extra window. Surely there were cheaper ways to promote onsite stays.

The issue with moving to a paid version (from a guest standpoint) is that in order for it to have any value, it has to be ridiculously priced or extremely limited. If it is not limited by price or inventory availability, then it will not be of benefit and will make the standby lines unacceptable.

As we can see with no FP, even with the COVID capacity restrictions the standby lines are not exactly short so just going to no FP of any kind doesn't help the wait time issue.
Compounding the issue is the way the FP and standby lines are handled at the attractions. I've lost count of how many times I've watched a FP line move as if the attraction is a walk-on, while the standby line doesn't move at all.
 

marni1971

WDW History nut
Premium Member
As we can see with no FP, even with the COVID capacity restrictions the standby lines are not exactly short so just going to no FP of any kind doesn't help the wait time issue.
You nailed it there (kind of) - standby is / was currently longer due to the restrictions. Be it spacing in the queue or loading restrictions.

The big show would be no restrictions and no FP (like for example when Mermaid opened )
 

LaughingGravy

Well-Known Member
I really liked that it wasn't activated until you were actually in the park, none of this booking rides out months in advance with a mad scramble online at home. Book another ride while you were on the queue for the current one. It was an up-charge of course, but it wasn't the kind of up charge that kicked others out of the park early like Christmas and Halloween events. And it was a nominal charge of $15 per person. There's value in that.
 

Jrb1979

Well-Known Member
Disney’s system is free to all guests and everyone has similar levels of access.
You can get some advantages (60day booking at WDW for resort guests and MaxPass meaning you don’t need to use FP kiosks at DLR) but the main scheme is free with a lot tickets.
Universal, Six Flags etc don’t offer any free virtual queue, only paying to skip the line. That’s the main reason people prefer Disney FastPass, it’s “free”. Other parks you can ride with a lot shorter waits but you’ll be paying a lot more for it.
Yes the fact it's free is the only good thing. There is a lot I don't like about it. The first is having to schedule my ride times and the big one for me is it not being easy to re-ride attractions. Last time I was at Universal I was able to ride the Mummy 6 times in one day. That's a big deal for me.
 

trojanjustin

Well-Known Member
Compounding the issue is the way the FP and standby lines are handled at the attractions. I've lost count of how many times I've watched a FP line move as if the attraction is a walk-on, while the standby line doesn't move at all.

They're supposed to take 80 FP guests for every 20 standby guests. Sometimes that even goes to 90/10. It's designed that way.
 

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