The Chit Chat Chit Chat Thread

wdisney9000

Truindenashendubapreser
Premium Member
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Do we just post random pics one after the other here?
 

drizgirl

Well-Known Member
Hilarious you think that. My neighbors kids who complain they cannot save drop at least $400 just on several $15-20 lunches a week, multiple Starbucks visits , while coffee is supplied at work / happy hours after work a month . Its a mindset to change behavior ( changing spending money mindset ) that some don't choose to do. That's why retailers love the slaves to debt mentality of consumers which also fuels our economy. If more would practice the FIRE lifestyle or the Millionaire Next Door lifestyle that would drastically affect the economy.
I assume you know lots of people out there are different from your neighbor?
 

The Mom

Moderator
Premium Member
Original Poster
When was the last time you had a kid in high school? Mine all had this.
I had this in Jr High, but my children did not - I had to home school them in finances. They both manage their finances very well, and when my daughter discovered that she could buy a Chanel skirt second hand for less than a new one at Target, she was hooked on thrift stores and consignment shopping.
 

The Mom

Moderator
Premium Member
Original Poster
Nah, his neighbors kids, who apparently have lunch and coffee 15-20 times a week (by his math) is a solid metric of the youth and their financial patterns.
Curriculums vary from area to area - what may be offered/required in one area may not be offered someplace else. And many people are more concerned with instant gratification rather than long term saving.

My HS had an indoor pool, so all students had to learn to swim in order to graduate - or at least get in the pool and try every week. I did have a classmate who never was able to pass the swim test, but she got into the pool and sank every week. Her fear and lack of body fat held her back.

So it is possible that people will have different experiences.
 
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wdisney9000

Truindenashendubapreser
Premium Member
Curriculums vary from area to area - what may be offered/required in one area may not be offered someplace else. And many people are more concerned with instant gratification rather than long term saving.

My HS had an indoor pool, so all students had to learn to swim in order to graduate - or at least get in the pool and try every week. I did have a classmate who never was able to pass the swim test, but she got into the pool ans sank every week. Her fear and lack of body fat held her back.

So it is possible that people will have different experiences.
Absolutely agree that people will have different experiences. There are so many factors that contribute to the overall outcome of how a younger person evolves emotionally, physically, financially etc. Moreso nowadays with social media.

My parents never sat us down and discussed saving for retirement but they made us work to earn the things we desired that were wants > needs. I learned quickly that I better get out there and knock on doors to see who wanted their yard mowed/raked so I could earn the money to buy the cool soccer cleats i wanted 😁
 

Goofyernmost

Well-Known Member
It would be helpful if high school students could have classes like financial planning/awareness. A number of kids in my area have no clue what it is like to save and invest long term. If someone in their early 20s could invest $400 monthly into an index mutual fund regardless of share price until age 65 with compounding interest of long term performance that person would have $1M. A secretary who did her role for 40 years set up on her own / invested in the markets when she started her role/ had separate accounts from her spouse. She became more aggressive in her investing when she received her annual raises. She never told her husband what she was doing. They lived frugally. By the time her husband and her both retired in their 60s she surprised him with at the time of her current holdings and index fund balance - $5M.
Although, that would be a nice thing to find out, if I went without stuff in the years when I could best enjoy it and now that I have advanced in age and my time is limited I found out that I'm set for what little life I have left, I would be depressed about it and thankful all at the same time.
 

King Capybara 77

Thank you sir. You were an inspiration.
Premium Member
Absolutely agree that people will have different experiences. There are so many factors that contribute to the overall outcome of how a younger person evolves emotionally, physically, financially etc. Moreso nowadays with social media.

My parents never sat us down and discussed saving for retirement but they made us work to earn the things we desired that were wants > needs. I learned quickly that I better get out there and knock on doors to see who wanted their yard mowed/raked so I could earn the money to buy the cool soccer cleats i wanted 😁
Football or hand egg ?
 

Lilofan

Well-Known Member
Although, that would be a nice thing to find out, if I went without stuff in the years when I could best enjoy it and now that I have advanced in age and my time is limited I found out that I'm set for what little life I have left, I would be depressed about it and thankful all at the same time.
Yes some want to live life at times to the fullest when in their younger years and that's a good thing since tomorrow is not guaranteed Some made lifestyle choices and saved and invested long term to allow them to have a substantial nest egg upon retiring. 401K when some start investing weekly at a young age and see their nest egg grow over time is the way to go. That's your money working harder than you do .
 

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