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Mickey and Minnie's Runaway Railway confirmed

Skibum1970

Well-Known Member
DHS is obviously not designed to handle the crowds MK is capable of. But could the demand to visit DHS surpass MK? It will be interesting to see what Disney does to spread out the crowds between the 4 parks.

Not that I'm an expert but MK reports around 7,000,000 more guests per year that DHS. So, I don't think demand at DHS would come close to that. I am still puzzled by "we have all this land" and yet it is used inefficiently.

Either way, I am about as excited as MMRR as the two Star Wars rides, primarily because I figure that I'll be able to get on this ride more easily and it looks really fun.
 

rle4lunch

Well-Known Member
Not that I'm an expert but MK reports around 7,000,000 more guests per year that DHS. So, I don't think demand at DHS would come close to that. I am still puzzled by "we have all this land" and yet it is used inefficiently.

Either way, I am about as excited as MMRR as the two Star Wars rides, primarily because I figure that I'll be able to get on this ride more easily and it looks really fun.

Pretty sure SWGE is gonna absorb a BIG part of that 7 million next year.
 

jt04

Well-Known Member
I know this is an unpopular opinion, but... I really hope they maintain Sunset Boulevard (meaning the full walk down it) as the only way to reach Tower of Terror. Walking down that street is "Scene 1" of one of the greatest theme park experiences ever created. I think it would be a shame for a substantial percentage of first-time visitors to miss out on that experience. Again, I know there are efficiency concerns and the like, so it's just IMHO.

I doubt there are any plans to remove or reroute Sunset.
 

rle4lunch

Well-Known Member
I don't think it CAN though, and that's the big problem. Far more people will be WANTING to get in than the park is physically capable of handling. At least, that's what I understand our park insiders to be saying.

Maybe not, but they'll do their best to shove as many in as possible. Hell, they'll probably have a pre show gift shop, and CM's walking around with card scanners to buy your merch before getting on the ride...
 

Goofyernmost

Well-Known Member
DHS is obviously not designed to handle the crowds MK is capable of. But could the demand to visit DHS surpass MK? It will be interesting to see what Disney does to spread out the crowds between the 4 parks.
In my mind the crowd is more likely to affect the other parks in a positive manner. It will be widely known that if you don't have a FP that the queue wait will be measured in hourly units. If you are determined to experience GE you are not going to leave the queue line to see something else. Just the FP people will have that luxury. So it is the front end of the group that will need more to do, and I think what is there and what will be opening previous will handle the overflow. It is SWL that is going to be a cluster. Many people like myself, that will not stand in line that long may go to DHS and experience the rest of the stuff, but, if I don't think I will get into the place I will just go to one of the other parks.
 

Purduevian

Well-Known Member
DHS is obviously not designed to handle the crowds MK is capable of. But could the demand to visit DHS surpass MK? It will be interesting to see what Disney does to spread out the crowds between the 4 parks.

Part of the problem with this is very few people will go to WDW and not go to MK at least for a day. If someone traveling to Orlando Florida to experience SWGE, they will almost certainly spend a day at MK as well. The issue is to a lot of people MK is Disney World, even if they are not super interested in going, someone in their party will want to go. I expect MK will increase far more than AK or EPCOT in 2020, because more guests will come to the area, and all will go to MK.
 

Marc Davis Fan

Well-Known Member
Part of the problem with this is very few people will go to WDW and not go to MK at least for a day. If someone traveling to Orlando Florida to experience SWGE, they will almost certainly spend a day at MK as well. The issue is to a lot of people MK is Disney World, even if they are not super interested in going, someone in their party will want to go. I expect MK will increase far more than AK or EPCOT in 2020, because more guests will come to the area, and all will go to MK.

Exactly. And that's why MK needs more high-capacity e-tickets and land expansions. Not just because it will keep needing more capacity as more people visit WDW to see things that are opening in the other parks - but also because it "represents" WDW to most people, and thus should be an absolute top tier representation of the best of what Disney can do.
 

yensidtlaw1969

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
No
Exactly. And that's why MK needs more high-capacity e-tickets and land expansions. Not just because it will keep needing more capacity as more people visit WDW to see things that are opening in the other parks - but also because it "represents" WDW to most people, and thus should be an absolute top tier representation of the best of what Disney can do.
The problem there is that this becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy -- If you take the park that most people would call quintessential and then expand and add to it, it's only going to become more popular and outshine the other parks further. The Magic Kingdom already has the most high capacity E-Tickets of any park in Florida.

If Epcot had a menu of 25+ attractions all up and down the A to E Ticket scale, 7-10 of which were considered classics, and all of them adhered to the themes of the park, I don't think it would have as a hard time pulling people in. It might still be seen as secondary to the "Castle Park" experience, but it would be a much closer second instead of a diiiistant second.

Same with Hollywood Studios and Animal Kingdom -- wouldn't you spend more time at each of them if they all had as much to do as MK? Wouldn't they feel as essential to the WDW experience, or at least much moreso? Animal Kingdom actually leapfrogged Epcot in visitation last year, which is due in no small part to that park being expanded with great new attractions and spaces. I'm sure we can count on Hollywood Studios to take up that mantle in 2020. But the park is so wildly under-built at the moment that it will be massacred under the Star Wars crowds. Hopefully it will push them to get serious about rounding out that park with a bigger attraction menu.

I love the Magic Kingdom and would love to see it grow and add new attractions, but it's already sooo far ahead of the other three parks that I think they need to really get serious about building them each out into full experiences before they can shower MK with more gems. It has plenty to do, but too many people who want to do those things. Give those people that many things to do at the other parks and the growth pattern should start to level out. Otherwise it will be a continual issue of building more to up capacity at MK, only for more people to come for the new stuff, which then needs more capacity built to handle those people . . . while the other parks continue to struggle in comparison.
 

Skibum1970

Well-Known Member
The problem there is that this becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy -- If you take the park that most people would call quintessential and then expand and add to it, it's only going to become more popular and outshine the other parks further. The Magic Kingdom already has the most high capacity E-Tickets of any park in Florida.

If Epcot had a menu of 25+ attractions all up and down the A to E Ticket scale, 7-10 of which were considered classics, and all of them adhered to the themes of the park, I don't think it would have as a hard time pulling people in. It might still be seen as secondary to the "Castle Park" experience, but it would be a much closer second instead of a diiiistant second.

Same with Hollywood Studios and Animal Kingdom -- wouldn't you spend more time at each of them if they all had as much to do as MK? Wouldn't they feel as essential to the WDW experience, or at least much moreso? Animal Kingdom actually leapfrogged Epcot in visitation last year, which is due in no small part to that park being expanded with great new attractions and spaces. I'm sure we can count on Hollywood Studios to take up that mantle in 2020. But the park is so wildly under-built at the moment that it will be massacred under the Star Wars crowds. Hopefully it will push them to get serious about rounding out that park with a bigger attraction menu.

I love the Magic Kingdom and would love to see it grow and add new attractions, but it's already sooo far ahead of the other three parks that I think they need to really get serious about building them each out into full experiences before they can shower MK with more gems. It has plenty to do, but too many people who want to do those things. Give those people that many things to do at the other parks and the growth pattern should start to level out. Otherwise it will be a continual issue of building more to up capacity at MK, only for more people to come for the new stuff, which then needs more capacity built to handle those people . . . while the other parks continue to struggle in comparison.

Completely agree with this. Thus, they need to have projects in the pipeline, with dirt and concrete moving now. Not waiting until after SWL opens. When Disney reworked DCA, they did it all at once and that is what needs to happen at DHS. To me, people will eventually grow tired of crowds with ridiculous wait times and they'll look to greener pastures. Such as when Universal opens up their their third theme park (which won't be a number of years, obviously).
 

Marc Davis Fan

Well-Known Member
The problem there is that this becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy -- If you take the park that most people would call quintessential and then expand and add to it, it's only going to become more popular and outshine the other parks further. The Magic Kingdom already has the most high capacity E-Tickets of any park in Florida.

If Epcot had a menu of 25+ attractions all up and down the A to E Ticket scale, 7-10 of which were considered classics, and all of them adhered to the themes of the park, I don't think it would have as a hard time pulling people in. It might still be seen as secondary to the "Castle Park" experience, but it would be a much closer second instead of a diiiistant second.

Same with Hollywood Studios and Animal Kingdom -- wouldn't you spend more time at each of them if they all had as much to do as MK? Wouldn't they feel as essential to the WDW experience, or at least much moreso? Animal Kingdom actually leapfrogged Epcot in visitation last year, which is due in no small part to that park being expanded with great new attractions and spaces. I'm sure we can count on Hollywood Studios to take up that mantle in 2020. But the park is so wildly under-built at the moment that it will be massacred under the Star Wars crowds. Hopefully it will push them to get serious about rounding out that park with a bigger attraction menu.

I love the Magic Kingdom and would love to see it grow and add new attractions, but it's already sooo far ahead of the other three parks that I think they need to really get serious about building them each out into full experiences before they can shower MK with more gems. It has plenty to do, but too many people who want to do those things. Give those people that many things to do at the other parks and the growth pattern should start to level out. Otherwise it will be a continual issue of building more to up capacity at MK, only for more people to come for the new stuff, which then needs more capacity built to handle those people . . . while the other parks continue to struggle in comparison.

This is a fair point.

It’s an unfortunate situation, because IMHO, Magic Kingdom (which again is perceived as WDW’s “flagship park,” if not as “WDW”) does not have anything as immersive and/or spectacular as World Showcase, Pandora, or what we can expect SWGE to be. Thus, the best of Disney is not present in the park that many people think of and remember as “Disney.”
 

LittleBuford

Well-Known Member
This is a fair point.

It’s an unfortunate situation, because IMHO, Magic Kingdom (which again is perceived as WDW’s “flagship park,” if not as “WDW”) does not have anything as immersive and/or spectacular as World Showcase, Pandora, or what we can expect SWGE to be. Thus, the best of Disney is not present in the park that many people think of and remember as “Disney.”

I would say that the whole of Magic Kingdom is incredibly immersive and spectacular. While World Showcase represents real countries and Pandora refers to a film IP, Magic Kingdom is a fairy-tale world unto itself, made up of diverse, imaginatively combined themes that exude pure Disney. I can't think of anywhere that transports me so thoroughly and effectively from the humdrum of real life.
 

RSoxNo1

Well-Known Member
Exactly. And that's why MK needs more high-capacity e-tickets and land expansions. Not just because it will keep needing more capacity as more people visit WDW to see things that are opening in the other parks - but also because it "represents" WDW to most people, and thus should be an absolute top tier representation of the best of what Disney can do.
The problem there is that this becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy -- If you take the park that most people would call quintessential and then expand and add to it, it's only going to become more popular and outshine the other parks further. The Magic Kingdom already has the most high capacity E-Tickets of any park in Florida.

If Epcot had a menu of 25+ attractions all up and down the A to E Ticket scale, 7-10 of which were considered classics, and all of them adhered to the themes of the park, I don't think it would have as a hard time pulling people in. It might still be seen as secondary to the "Castle Park" experience, but it would be a much closer second instead of a diiiistant second.

Same with Hollywood Studios and Animal Kingdom -- wouldn't you spend more time at each of them if they all had as much to do as MK? Wouldn't they feel as essential to the WDW experience, or at least much moreso? Animal Kingdom actually leapfrogged Epcot in visitation last year, which is due in no small part to that park being expanded with great new attractions and spaces. I'm sure we can count on Hollywood Studios to take up that mantle in 2020. But the park is so wildly under-built at the moment that it will be massacred under the Star Wars crowds. Hopefully it will push them to get serious about rounding out that park with a bigger attraction menu.

I love the Magic Kingdom and would love to see it grow and add new attractions, but it's already sooo far ahead of the other three parks that I think they need to really get serious about building them each out into full experiences before they can shower MK with more gems. It has plenty to do, but too many people who want to do those things. Give those people that many things to do at the other parks and the growth pattern should start to level out. Otherwise it will be a continual issue of building more to up capacity at MK, only for more people to come for the new stuff, which then needs more capacity built to handle those people . . . while the other parks continue to struggle in comparison.
Don't get me wrong, an E-ticket addition would be welcome to Magic Kingdom (and it's getting one in two years), but it needs people eating attractions. It's why I maintain that a second Fantasyland expansion where you have several more Mermaid like D-tickets would really be the best course of action for that park.

Similarly if you're going to add an E-ticket it would have to be a remarkably efficient one and I'd put it over in Adventureland. The park probably needs 6-10K more per hour attraction capacity than it currently has. Eliminating the Main Street theater project really hurts because that would have helped pull guests to another area of the park and was unlikely to substantially affect attendance.
 

kthomas105

Well-Known Member
Here's a question that no one here may know the answer to but here goes anyways. Now that MMRR has been all but confirmed for Mickey's Toon Town at DL and it seems like such an appropriate fit for that land. Is it possible that MMRR was in fact designed for DL but was borrowed to replace GMR when They decided not to put the money into refurbishing it? Track with me, maybe they said we need something to replace GMR since we aren't going to fix it and there is going to be loads of people in 2019 at DHS b/c of SWGE. So they say "well we have this concept we've been working on that we can make work."

I'm sure that I am just connecting dots that don't actually connect but thematically it seems that this ride doesn't fit as well in DHS as it does in MTT. I was excited about having a one of a kind ride as a headliner for DHS but since it seems that they will clone it to DL, and possibly DLP, it just made me think that maybe it was always in the works for DL but got expressed for DHS instead to help with capacity and to replace GMR instead of a refurb.

Just my thoughts.
 

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