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Indiana Jones Land?

rowrbazzle

Well-Known Member
We live in our little Disney nerd bubble in here where we hear a lot of the goings-on well before they're announced, which also makes things feel like they take forever to come to fruition.

I'm constantly in awe/amazement when on my bi-yearly visit to WDW I still hear many a conversation where people are talking about it being their first visit or have zero clue what is going on in the parks. It's great to know there are so many first timers still going, but it also brings me back into reality that our little micro-disney-verse we live in here on the boards is not, and never will be, the general consensus of the normal park-goer.

From the time Ratatouille (not a new ride) was announced by Disney and it opens, it will have been almost 3 years. From the time Guardians (new ride) was announced by Disney and it opens, it will have been 3.5-4 years. From the time Tron (not a new ride) was announced by Disney and when it opens, it will have been 3.5-4 years. And so on.

Folks here have more knowledge of what's going on. But that's not why it seems like things take forever to come to fruition. Watching the Imagineering Story I was floored by how quickly Disney used to accomplish things. Entire parks would be announced and completed in less time than it takes them to build one ride now.
 

jt04

Well-Known Member
From the time Ratatouille (not a new ride) was announced by Disney and it opens, it will have been almost 3 years. From the time Guardians (new ride) was announced by Disney and it opens, it will have been 3.5-4 years. From the time Tron (not a new ride) was announced by Disney and when it opens, it will have been 3.5-4 years. And so on.

Folks here have more knowledge of what's going on. But that's not why it seems like things take forever to come to fruition. Watching the Imagineering Story I was floored by how quickly Disney used to accomplish things. Entire parks would be announced and completed in less time than it takes them to build one ride now.

Tron costs almost twice as much as the original Disneyland adjusted. 17 million vs 300 million plus per some sources. So very apples and oranges. If my numbers are off anyone can feel free to correct them.
 

kpilcher

Well-Known Member
What would you consider a d ticket nowadays?
Of relatively recent attractions, I think Mermaid's a D, Frozen Ever After, in scope so is Smuggler's Run. I'd call Enchanted Tales with Belle a C, along with Laugh Floor and the Nemo Seas ride. My opinions, of course.
 

Purduevian

Well-Known Member
What would you consider a d ticket nowadays?
Not OP, but my list of Solid D tickets would be:
Mine Train, Jungle Cruise, Mission Space, Frozen, Mania, Star Tours, Kali. I don't think alone these attractions should be able to anchor a section of the park (some currently do though), but are almost there.
 

rowrbazzle

Well-Known Member
Tron costs almost twice as much as the original Disneyland adjusted. 17 million vs 300 million plus per some sources. So very apples and oranges. If my numbers are off anyone can feel free to correct them.

Animal Kingdom cost (what) $1.5 billion adjusted and was constructed in less time than Tron. Galaxy's Edge cost a billion (more?) and just finished in the same apparent timeframe as Tron (but longer than AK). HK Disney cost more than AK or GE and was even faster. Take your pick.
 

jt04

Well-Known Member
Animal Kingdom cost (what) $1.5 billion adjusted and was constructed in less time than Tron. Galaxy's Edge cost a billion (more?) and just finished in the same apparent timeframe as Tron (but longer than AK). HK Disney cost more than AK or GE and was even faster. Take your pick.

No one doubts they could build Tron faster. But when the sum of all capital investments over the last decade at WDW is considered, it becomes clear why they would want the funds allocated across many quarters.
 

CaptainAmerica

Premium Member
From the time Ratatouille (not a new ride) was announced by Disney and it opens, it will have been almost 3 years. From the time Guardians (new ride) was announced by Disney and it opens, it will have been 3.5-4 years. From the time Tron (not a new ride) was announced by Disney and when it opens, it will have been 3.5-4 years. And so on.

Folks here have more knowledge of what's going on. But that's not why it seems like things take forever to come to fruition. Watching the Imagineering Story I was floored by how quickly Disney used to accomplish things. Entire parks would be announced and completed in less time than it takes them to build one ride now.
It's much, much easier to build on open land when you can run equipment 24 hours a day than it is to build within an already existing (and open to the public) park.
 

DVCakaCarlF

Well-Known Member
It's much, much easier to build on open land when you can run equipment 24 hours a day than it is to build within an already existing (and open to the public) park.
That’s a great point...deliveries, dust control, etc. are much more of a concern around any construction site today, as compared to years prior. I dont even have to tell you about the guest experience either...scrims, fencing, etc.

Furthermore, the availability of qualified contractors and employees is limited in the current economy. As a result, both the cost and schedule are significantly higher.
 

Robbiem

Well-Known Member
It's much, much easier to build on open land when you can run equipment 24 hours a day than it is to build within an already existing (and open to the public) park.

construction rules may also be different in a place like Hong Kong. in Florida with the reedy creek powers Disney should be ab to do things faster but it obviously pays them not to for some reason
 

rowrbazzle

Well-Known Member
It's much, much easier to build on open land when you can run equipment 24 hours a day than it is to build within an already existing (and open to the public) park.

I'm sure there are limitations with having guests around. I wouldn't expect them to work 24 hrs a day, but I can't imagine that's what they were doing on previous projects either. Regardless, they don't limit construction to only when the parks are closed. And we're still talking about something muuuuuuch smaller than an entire park. Even just compared to Galaxy's Edge, Tron and Guardians are slow.

No one doubts they could build Tron faster. But when the sum of all capital investments over the last decade at WDW is considered, it becomes clear why they would want the funds allocated across many quarters.

Oh, sure. They obviously think it's more cost-effective to do it this way. My examples were in response to the idea that Disney seems slow because we follow them closely. I think Disney is actually slow.
 
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SuperStretccch

Well-Known Member
i agree with the overall sentiment that disney's snail-like pace with building new attractions should be put to an end.

i take a look at other projects like Hagrid at Universal and how that finished up in under 2 years, while Disney takes twice the amount of time to build a coaster that not only exists elsewhere already, but is generally less complicated from an engineering standpoint too. No reason why it should take so long to literally just clone a coaster from elsewhere barring the blueprint changes that had to be made. i almost wonder if it would be better if disney had went the universal route of doing things and not announced any of these attractions until they were already under construction for a while (so most current projects would've been announced at 2019 expo and not 2017). at least it would've been more fun because of all the speculation beforehand... and it may have alleviated my frustrations a bit, but still, something needs to change.
 

jt04

Well-Known Member
I'm sure there are limitations with having guests around. I wouldn't expect them to work 24 hrs a day, but I can't imagine that's what they were doing on previous projects either. Regardless, they don't limit construction to only when the parks are closed. And we're still talking about something muuuuuuch smaller than an entire park. Even just compared to Galaxy's Edge, Tron and Guardians are slow.



Oh, sure. They obviously think it's more cost-effective to do it this way. My examples were in response to the idea that Disney seems slow because we follow them closely. I think Disney is actually slow.

Disney quality takes time. Ideally.
 

jt04

Well-Known Member
Meet me in Orlando in the fall and let’s do it together.

Needs to be an insider such as a recently retired Imagineer or park manager. Somebody that is as familiar with the day to day operations and decisions as you are but with an opposing perspective. If they retired there may not be an NDA.
 

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