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News Expect closure of Hong Kong Disneyland and Shanghai Disneyland to impact Walt Disney World

phillip9698

Well-Known Member
That's really not quite true. The problem is that this disease often doesn't show symptoms until the patient has already been contagious. It literally takes one person who has the virus without symptoms to go to a populated area and the virus will spread. In large countries it's difficult to quarantine citizens, especially when the concept of "freedom" is something that has been taught since they were children. We need to ramp up production of the testing kits/swabs but I don't really see this being contained no matter what the government's response would have been.


Its embarrassing whats taking place here. Going beyond testing, we are failing on what to do with people who currently have the virus.
 

Lilofan

Well-Known Member
Their local clinic or hospital would send a sample to get tested.
I'm sorry I was not clear. States want to get testing kits sent directly to them so tests can be done right then and there. If samples needed to be sent to the testing centers aka Atlanta then there would be a 48 hour runaround on the results. I'm thinking major cities will get them and force people in rural areas to travel to the city.
 

iowamomof4

Well-Known Member
I'm sorry I was not clear. States want to get testing kits sent directly to them so tests can be done right then and there. If samples needed to be sent to the testing centers aka Atlanta then there would be a 48 hour runaround on the results. I'm thinking major cities will get them and force people in rural areas to travel to the city.

For example, I live in Iowa. I would expect that whichever labs in Iowa get permission to conduct testing will be accepting samples from across the state, not just at their specific hospital or in their specific city.
 

thecouch

Active Member
I think Florida would be one of the worst places for this to spread. Isn't Florida a very popular retirement location. Death rates I've seen were up to 40 is only 0.2%. 70 to 80 is 15% . Over 80 25%.
 

Donald Razorduck

Well-Known Member
However it, and the FluMist (The nasal spray version of the vaccine), is covered by most insurance.
Again, not really free unless you are given your insurance and even then it is priced into your compensation package. My employer pays my premium, I have no deductions to my pay for my insurance. My wife's family plan offers better overall coverage for the kids but she has to carry me. I would be charged to cover the kids through my job and it is more expensive than her family plan that covers us all. I can not drop my free coverage and get the difference in regular pay. Nothing is free.
 

rmwebs

Well-Known Member
In terms of how quick its going to spread obviously nobody really knows anything other than looking at what its done so far. Here in the UK the government did finally admit today that theres a high chance of it spreading significantly, to the point where they have mentioned new powers to put entire cities on lockdown and fine people for traveling to affected areas if needed.

Whats the likelyhood of the government in the US actually being willing (and able?) to put those kinds of restrictions in place though, as if it does spread like crazy I'd imagine its absolutely needed regardless of constitutional rights.
 

IanDLBZF

Well-Known Member
So far, JetBlue, Alaska, AA, and now Delta are suspending cancellation and change fees due to this. No word if United, Spirit, Sun Country, Southwest, Allegiant, and Frontier will be doing anything similar.
 
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monothingie

I once was a ferret for a day.
Premium Member
So far, JetBlue, Alaska, AA, and now Delta are suspending cancellation and change fees due to this. No word if United, Spirit, Sun Country, Southwest, Allegiant, and Frontier will be doing anything similar.

Just an FYI the only airline offering cancelation waivers is Jet Blue (South West can be canceled anytime without penalty). American, Alaska, Delta are offering change waivers only meaning the the travel must be used within a year of modification. It also must be in the same ticketed cabin and if the flight is more expensive you pay the difference. Further the tickets must have been purchased within a specific window. If you purchased your ticket last year for example, you're SOL to get a change waiver. Of course you could plead your case to a customer service agent and wait on hold for a long time. It works more often than you think.
 

TJ Vazquez

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
No
I think Florida would be one of the worst places for this to spread. Isn't Florida a very popular retirement location. Death rates I've seen were up to 40 is only 0.2%. 70 to 80 is 15% . Over 80 25%.
Those rates are skewed in that there were less people that contracted the virus at age 70 and above so any death will skew that %.
 

Chip Chipperson

Well-Known Member
Just an FYI the only airline offering cancelation waivers is Jet Blue (South West can be canceled anytime without penalty). American, Alaska, Delta are offering change waivers only meaning the the travel must be used within a year of modification. It also must be in the same ticketed cabin and if the flight is more expensive you pay the difference. Further the tickets must have been purchased within a specific window. If you purchased your ticket last year for example, you're SOL to get a change waiver. Of course you could plead your case to a customer service agent and wait on hold for a long time. It works more often than you think.


Wow, the part that I bolded seems absolutely backwards if I'm understanding it correctly. If you paid months in advance without any way of knowing that this virus would even exist then you're out of luck, but if you bought a ticket after the virus started making the news they'll let you change your flight to another future date? What a stupid policy and a terrible way to treat customers who made plans well in advance.
 

Lilofan

Well-Known Member
When people heard about this around where I live in Manatee, you could see panic on their faces. I told them nothing to worry about if you wash your hands and don't have a weak immune system.
Reports of a third FL case awaiting confirmation tests in same area. The 2nd FL confirmed case - female who traveled FL to Italy and back to FL lived with her roommate in FL. Now the roommate is infected and awaiting confirmation tests.
 

JohnD

Well-Known Member

monothingie

I once was a ferret for a day.
Premium Member
Wow, the part that I bolded seems absolutely backwards if I'm understanding it correctly. If you paid months in advance without any way of knowing that this virus would even exist then you're out of luck, but if you bought a ticket after the virus started making the news they'll let you change your flight to another future date? What a stupid policy and a terrible way to treat customers who made plans well in advance.


Delta for example:
  • Affected Customers: All international tickets (not including travel within the U.S. 50) issued between March 1, 2020 - March 31, 2020
Alaska
Tickets purchased after 2/27

AA
Tickets purchased after 2/27
 

Nubs70

Premium Member
Just a note on some manufacturing observations.

My customers make the material for boxboard/cardboard boxes. Their warehouses are full of product, have processed and stored product for April shipment, and are now taking downtime. We have yet to see the oncoming slowdown. Remarks from customers is this is showing the same pattern the preceded the 08 downturn.
 

Squishy

Well-Known Member
Conversations are ongoing today about the Paris resort. Likely to close on Wednesday, but could be pushed to Friday. Little point in having it open regardless if attendance drops more than 70%.

To those of you who have sent me private messages, it may be a day or so before I get the chance to respond.
Guessing it got pushed back?
 

DisneyCane

Well-Known Member
Rather than closing parks it would make more sense to do what China is doing for entry to certain areas and checking for fevers and not allowing entry to people with fevers.

Evidence from an interview that I think was posted in the other thread from an expert that went to China as part of a WHO mission suggests that asymptomatic transmission isn't happening typically. Therefore a sane containment strategy is to keep people with symptoms common to the virus away from uninfected people.

It seems the vast majority of transmission was found to be within families that are in close contact for long durations.

For an unknown reason this virus doesn't seem to have almost any serious cases amongst children. It has, by far, the most serious cases amongst the elderly. The elderly are definitely the smallest demographic at WDW (or any theme park). Perhaps just recommending that the elderly postpone trips would be enough of a precaution.
 

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