News Disney Riviera Resort announced

Missing20K

Well-Known Member
@BeckyTheTechy posted this CGI promo over in the Gondola thread:
Still an odd mashup of geographic locales but oh well. That horse is drying between sheets of construction paper in a kindergarten room in Dubuque, Iowa.

I find it humorous that they've released concept art and fly through animations only after completing the BIM model and construction drawings. It's almost always the other way around. Rarely does the concept art and animations look like the final product, but in this case, the animation has to look like the final product because it used the actual construction model. Very atypical for most architecture projects.

Where are all the people enjoying the resort? I guess this animation shows guests what it would be like to walk the punch list. Give every guest a roll of blue and a roll of green painters tape.

The interiors appear to be fairly well appointed. Roof top restaurant and space looks nice enough I suppose.

Still a pretty big, "meh", for me.
 

MansionButler84

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
No
Still an odd mashup of geographic locales but oh well. That horse is drying between sheets of construction paper in a kindergarten room in Dubuque, Iowa.

I find it humorous that they've released concept art and fly through animations only after completing the BIM model and construction drawings. It's almost always the other way around. Rarely does the concept art and animations look like the final product, but in this case, the animation has to look like the final product because it used the actual construction model. Very atypical for most architecture projects.

Where are all the people enjoying the resort? I guess this animation shows guests what it would be like to walk the punch list. Give every guest a roll of blue and a roll of green painters tape.

The interiors appear to be fairly well appointed. Roof top restaurant and space looks nice enough I suppose.

Still a pretty big, "meh", for me.
It looks like a lovely Sheraton. If only its room rates weren't similar to the Sheraton in Times Square...
 

nickys

Premium Member
Almost everyone I know who has taken the tour have been blown away by them, and a lot have added on as a result. The videos online look amazing.

The new Murphy beds are a big hit, and the pull down under the TV is a full twin. The studios have a shower and bath with overhead shower.

Someone said they toured the CCV studio show room at the same time, and it seemed small and cramped in comparison. Main complaint about the 1-bed is the master is on the small side.

I can’t wait to book it for our next trip, definitely going to do a few nights there, even if I have to do a cash reservation.
 

Lensman

Premium Member
It looks like a lovely Sheraton. If only its room rates weren't similar to the Sheraton in Times Square...
At least it's a step up from the Holiday Inn look that some were expecting earlier in the thread! Lol

The flyover obviously (hopefully?) doesn't have all the small exterior detailing, but the exterior flyover was more impressive than I thought it would be, as far as the design of the exterior spaces themselves. How much detailing there will be is the big question in my mind. I'm hoping that it won't be as bad as VGF was, as compared to the GF itself.

The interior common spaces also have potential, I think, though the restaurant interiors left me unimpressed. I'm hoping that this is reflective of the lack of modeling of the detail for those spaces, not the anticipated lack of detail itself.
The interiors appear to be fairly well appointed. Roof top restaurant and space looks nice enough I suppose.
I'm most worried about the restaurant spaces we saw in the video. What are your thoughts? Maybe it's just that they're not modeling the soft treatments and actual furniture, or maybe they're not modeling the detailing correctly?

I'm hoping based on @nickys' comment about visitors being impressed by the tour that the small interior spaces will be better than modeled.
Almost everyone I know who has taken the tour have been blown away by them, and a lot have added on as a result. The videos online look amazing.

The new Murphy beds are a big hit, and the pull down under the TV is a full twin. The studios have a shower and bath with overhead shower.

Someone said they toured the CCV studio show room at the same time, and it seemed small and cramped in comparison. Main complaint about the 1-bed is the master is on the small side.

I can’t wait to book it for our next trip, definitely going to do a few nights there, even if I have to do a cash reservation.
 

Missing20K

Well-Known Member
I'm most worried about the restaurant spaces we saw in the video. What are your thoughts? Maybe it's just that they're not modeling the soft treatments and actual furniture, or maybe they're not modeling the detailing correctly?
I'm thinking they realized right before sending the files out to the render farm that the interior spaces looked a bit stale and empty and they had to hurry up and add some furniture. There are a large number of "unadorned" areas, be they areas lacking furniture, walls lacking artwork or signage, and as you noted, poor quality of detail in the rendering regarding soft goods (or complete lack thereof). Simply adding entourage would have been helpful to hide some of these details. Showing guests (even when static figures, though animated would be better) would have helped to mask some of those areas as viewers become focused on the people in the frame and how they are "experiencing" the spaces, placing themselves in the shoes of the people shown in the artwork.

It's just a bit unfinished. This is what you get when the architects are more concerned (and rightly so) about RFI's, change orders, shop drawings, etc., and the interns and/or off-shore rendering farms are relegated to dealing with the concept art and animations.

WDI, in my opinion, should have better oversight. They are the client, and they shouldn't have any issues telling the architect the quality of animation and/or concept art is not up to the standard WDI has set for themselves historically. The architect should have a better understanding of their client and the precedents set by the client. Particularly because this client has a very specific and cultural impact based upon the artwork the company created over the course of nearly 8 decades.
 

RandySavage

Well-Known Member
Here is a small taste of the grand hotels of the Golden Age of European travel/French Riviera region - done in the Beaux Arts style. These are the buildings that Disney and its outside architects utterly failed to live up to in this case:
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There is no architectural aspect of Disney's Riviera building that adheres to the stated theme, save for the roof/dormers, which aren't very well executed. It's a massive and tragic missed opportunity... an opportunity to create the next great Disney themed deluxe resort inspired by a highly worthy historic example (alongside the Gilded Age Seaside hotel of America or the National Park lodge).

Instead they built a generic modern sheraton with a mansard roof & a dome.
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trainplane3

Well-Known Member
Here is a small taste us of the grand hotels of the Golden Age of European travel/French Riviera region - done in the Beaux Arts style. These are the buildings that Disney and its outsides architects utterly failed to live up to in this case:
View attachment 373482
View attachment 373483

View attachment 373484

View attachment 373485
View attachment 373486

There is literally no architectural aspect of Disney's Riviera building that adheres to the stated theme, save for the roof/dormers, which aren't very well executed. It's a massive and tragic missed opportunity... an opportunity to create the next great Disney themed deluxe resort inspired by a highly worthy historic example (alongside the Gilded Age Seaside hotel of America or the National Park lodge).

Instead they built a generic modern sheraton with a mansard roof & dome.
View attachment 373487
My favorite features are how there are only green shutters on the top floor and a few on the second floor. But by far the best feature is the blank space on the left!
 

cosmicgirl

Well-Known Member
I’m always a big fan of shutters that are not actually big enough to cover the window.
Not to get into an architectural debate because I have no expertise whatsoever in that field, but there are shutters that fold in half with hinges and are fully functional. I grew up in a house that has them and they are used every single day. I see that it's a poor design choice in this case (one of many) but it isn't always a poor choice. Just because they look like they can't cover the windows doesn't mean that they can't. Just wanted to put that out there because the shutters have come up before.
 

lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
Not to get into an architectural debate because I have no expertise whatsoever in that field, but there are shutters that fold in half with hinges and are fully functional. I grew up in a house that has them and they are used every single day. I see that it's a poor design choice in this case (one of many) but it isn't always a poor choice. Just because they look like they can't cover the windows doesn't mean that they can't. Just wanted to put that out there because the shutters have come up before.
Then they would be ¼ the width of the windows. They would have a proportional relationship.
 

Bocabear

Well-Known Member
It's mostly pretty bad from a thematic standpoint...If it were just a box hotel, then I would say it was good...But it is hardly the style that Disney became famous for... Pretty uninspiring. Nice that it has a skyway... and the rooftop lounge is a plus... Other than that, it could be any Sheraton or Marriott property... As I suspected from the initial concept art...meh.
 
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