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Disney plus Imagineering

BrianLo

Well-Known Member
In a really sad way, I feel like Expedition Everest is an Imagineering swansong. I honestly think its the last, non-IP thrill ride we will see... UNLESS new management down the line figures out that we want originality back in our attractions.

We would be fortunate to have it here on the west coast.
Technically I'd give that to honour to Hong Kong. Grizzly Gulch (2012) and Mystic Point (2013) were the last real things from that "era" of parks not being an arm of franchise integration. Toy Story play land aside, but that's more the fault of the government asking for a redesign on the third aspect of the project after the modus operandi had switched.

Everest was an Eisner project holdover and principle design would have occurred while he was CEO.

Hong Kong's project were largely developed early in Iger's tenure (2006-2008)-ish.

Simultaneously though would have been Lassiter's influence into the DCA redo with the gravitation towards unified IP lands with Radiator Springs. Something that was actually announced prior to Hogsmead!

After those would have been planned and budgeted do we see really see Iger's principles overtake the Shanghai Disneyland project. Circa 2009-2010 (when a lot of that project came together) brings us the snapshot in time mix of IP like Tron and live-action POTC.

By 2011 it was totally a lost cause. Hogsmead blew the doors open, reaffirming Iger's mandate in a big way. Staggs went on a fishing expedition for their Harry Potter. Radiator Springs also brought Disney some Potter-like success in 2012 and that's when it was all a lost cause.
 

Animaniac93-98

Well-Known Member
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After those would have been planned and budgeted do we see really see Iger's principles overtake the Shanghai Disneyland project. Circa 2009-2010 (when a lot of that project came together) brings us the snapshot in time mix of IP like Tron and live-action POTC.
Look at Disney's 2010/2011 release slate and look at all the things at SDL based in part or whole from them:

Tim Burton's Alice in Wonderland
Toy Story 3 [another Buzz ride]
Tangled
TRON: Legacy
Winnie the Pooh (2011)*
Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides

*there's nothing specific from this version of Pooh, but it was still a new franchise installment at the time
 

BrianLo

Well-Known Member
Look at Disney's 2010/2011 release slate and look at all the things at SDL based in part or whole from them:

Tim Burton's Alice in Wonderland
Toy Story 3 [another Buzz ride]
Tangled
TRON: Legacy
Winnie the Pooh (2011)*
Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides

*there's nothing specific from this version of Pooh, but it was still a new franchise installment at the time
I like Shanghai and it's a weird mix of not our current IP du jour, making it weirdly charming again.

But nothing is more of a time capsule of IP than it.

You can see their last second scramble at the park opening. Throwing up temporary pavilions' for their Marvel, Frozen, Star Wars acquisitions. Plus an actually successful WDS IP like Zootopia rapid fire being used for marketing material.

Shanghai Disneyland would be literally unrecognizable if it were delayed by 5 years... except I'm sure Toy Story Playland would have still made the cut. :rolleyes:
 

BrianLo

Well-Known Member
Oh, I forgot! We can count Shanghai's Adventure Isle as the dying breath.

The only IP is Tarzan (which I think the show closed?) and very subtle acknowledgement that the River Ride is technically in a theme park micro-universe with Indiana Jones and Twilight Zone. Something I feel like isn't very well known here.
 

flynnibus

Well-Known Member
The "Studio" Park concept is inherently cheaper by design. The question is, did they build a studio park because it was cheaper, or did they build a studio park for other reasons, and it being cheaper was just a happy coincidence.
Just no
 

Mac Tonight

Well-Known Member
Technically I'd give that to honour to Hong Kong. Grizzly Gulch (2012) and Mystic Point (2013) were the last real things from that "era" of parks not being an arm of franchise integration. Toy Story play land aside, but that's more the fault of the government asking for a redesign on the third aspect of the project after the modus operandi had switched.

Everest was an Eisner project holdover and principle design would have occurred while he was CEO.

Hong Kong's project were largely developed early in Iger's tenure (2006-2008)-ish.

Simultaneously though would have been Lassiter's influence into the DCA redo with the gravitation towards unified IP lands with Radiator Springs. Something that was actually announced prior to Hogsmead!

After those would have been planned and budgeted do we see really see Iger's principles overtake the Shanghai Disneyland project. Circa 2009-2010 (when a lot of that project came together) brings us the snapshot in time mix of IP like Tron and live-action POTC.

By 2011 it was totally a lost cause. Hogsmead blew the doors open, reaffirming Iger's mandate in a big way. Staggs went on a fishing expedition for their Harry Potter. Radiator Springs also brought Disney some Potter-like success in 2012 and that's when it was all a lost cause.
Fair points. So I'll clarify and say it was the last thing stateside.
 

MK-fan

Member
Too bad they didn’t talk about Pooh’s Hunny Hunt and Monsters Inc Ride and Go Seek!, two very impressive Tokyo Disneyland attractions, hopefully they show off the New Beauty and the Beast ride they’re opening in 4 months.
 

Animaniac93-98

Well-Known Member
Too bad they didn’t talk about Pooh’s Hunny Hunt and Monsters Inc Ride and Go Seek!, two very impressive Tokyo Disneyland attractions, hopefully they show off the New Beauty and the Beast ride they’re opening in 4 months.
They spent 4 minutes or so talking about ALL of DisneySea. Compare that with how much they talked about Midway Mania at DCA.

Like the company at large, Tokyo is not a priority for the series.
 

BrianLo

Well-Known Member
There is another upcoming series called "Behind the attraction" that is also being produced. One hour episodes on an individual attraction, which is obviously not the scope of this show that covers an entire decade of Disney parks in an hour. BUT... don't fear, eventually I feel like everyone's what about _____ will get its own Disney+ content.


I actually feel like given the episode count, they have hit remarkably well on the highlights. Yes Hunny Hunt is great, but it doesn't really further much narrative of the series as a whole when the same talking points about LPS could be made in Mystic Manor. Also the series further addressed online criticism reasonably well. Regardless of the conclusions, it continues not to be a puff piece.


As an aside - I went to Tokyo for the first time very shortly after the parks re-opened in 2011. About two weeks after they reopened I think. That was a touching tribute and people were just strangely thankful to see tourists, because the domestic media was fear mongering like you'd expect. I didn't really think or expect that the series would mention that.
 

MK-fan

Member
That was my least favorite episode so far. Kim talking about the fans was a bit annoying. There’s a good reason we don’t “trust them” journey into imagination being a great example.
Just look at the terrible Ant-Man and the Wasp Nano Battle Ride that no one talks about, we just hear about Pixar Pier and Mission Breakout but that is such a dud, if you watch the video on YouTube, about 95% of the comments state how bad the ride is
 

MK-fan

Member
Just look at the terrible Ant-Man and the Wasp Nano Battle Ride that no one talks about, we just hear about Pixar Pier and Mission Breakout but that is such a dud, if you watch the video on YouTube, about 95% of the comments state how bad the ride is
 
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