Disney College Program for Fall Advantage Cancelled

markc

Active Member
I think it goes without saying - it's incredibly sad and unfortunate for all those who lost their ability to finish or start the CP. Not having a job or knowing what your next move is incredibly scary, frustrating, and disheartening, especially if it's an opportunity that you were looking forward to.

With the above being said, I can't stress it enough to everybody (After reading some comments here)....DO NOT FALL FOR THE TRAP THAT IS THE WDWCP! lol. So many comments here are about lamenting their loss of a potential career at Disney or a stepping stone within the company to something bigger and better. Let me be real with everybody, that RARELY happens, if ever. It's a marketing ploy used to lure college students away from their homes to import cheap labor in Florida. Despite what's said in the WDWCP Orientation's and On Campus Recruiting presentations, they're not looking for future Disney career employees. Take my advice - focus on your studies in college, get an internship at a company where your area of study is utilized so you can learn, get a job out of college at a company where you can learn and gain more experience..and then 4-5 years start applying for jobs within the Walt Disney Company that apply to your field of study. Not only will you be on a path to a more solid career, but the pay that you will start out at TWDC will be exponentially higher than it would've been had you just worked your way via the college program. And one poster made a very good point earlier - he was told that California was the place to be for the role he wanted. That's true for most positions within TWDC as a whole across all the business units. Keep that in mind when thinking that relocating to Florida is where you need to be.

Be sad that you aren't in Florida right now. Be frustrated that events have caused a slight bump in the road for you this year. But do not think that this has ruined any opportunities you had with Disney or your career. Trust me on this. :)
 

jyn erso

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
No
I think it goes without saying - it's incredibly sad and unfortunate for all those who lost their ability to finish or start the CP. Not having a job or knowing what your next move is incredibly scary, frustrating, and disheartening, especially if it's an opportunity that you were looking forward to.

With the above being said, I can't stress it enough to everybody (After reading some comments here)....DO NOT FALL FOR THE TRAP THAT IS THE WDWCP! lol. So many comments here are about lamenting their loss of a potential career at Disney or a stepping stone within the company to something bigger and better. Let me be real with everybody, that RARELY happens, if ever. It's a marketing ploy used to lure college students away from their homes to import cheap labor in Florida. Despite what's said in the WDWCP Orientation's and On Campus Recruiting presentations, they're not looking for future Disney career employees. Take my advice - focus on your studies in college, get an internship at a company where your area of study is utilized so you can learn, get a job out of college at a company where you can learn and gain more experience..and then 4-5 years start applying for jobs within the Walt Disney Company that apply to your field of study. Not only will you be on a path to a more solid career, but the pay that you will start out at TWDC will be exponentially higher than it would've been had you just worked your way via the college program. And one poster made a very good point earlier - he was told that California was the place to be for the role he wanted. That's true for most positions within TWDC as a whole across all the business units. Keep that in mind when thinking that relocating to Florida is where you need to be.

Be sad that you aren't in Florida right now. Be frustrated that events have caused a slight bump in the road for you this year. But do not think that this has ruined any opportunities you had with Disney or your career. Trust me on this. :)
Thank you for this perspective. I am not in any way trying to sound confrontational, I'm simply curious- did you ever do the DCP?

My plan was to do DCP, transfer to FT after, hopefully become a Trainer or even a relief Coordnator, have Disney pay for my tuition through Aspire, and apply for Disney's Professional Internships all the while I get my Bachelors. Hopefully by then I could get a higher position. I honestly loved working there for the time that I did and my leaders were all great and wanted us to succeed. I don't think my job as QSFB was what I wanted to do for the rest of my life but I did enjoy it, and it wouldn't be a bad job during my college years.
 

markc

Active Member
Thank you for this perspective. I am not in any way trying to sound confrontational, I'm simply curious- did you ever do the DCP?
Fair question. No I personally did not. But I know 100's of individuals who did and know many responsible for the program currently.

My plan was to do DCP, transfer to FT after, hopefully become a Trainer or even a relief Coordnator, have Disney pay for my tuition through Aspire, and apply for Disney's Professional Internships all the while I get my Bachelors. Hopefully by then I could get a higher position. I honestly loved working there for the time that I did and my leaders were all great and wanted us to succeed. I don't think my job as QSFB was what I wanted to do for the rest of my life but I did enjoy it, and it wouldn't be a bad job during my college years.
The difference between you and 1000's of other CP's, is that you have a plan in place that seems rooted in reality. I would encourage you to do it if you feel strongly that this is your best path to success in your career. I'd stress though, Disney's Professional Internships are incredibly competitive (especially the internships that don't require previous WDWCP participation) and if your career hinges upon obtaining one, just evaluate it seriously before the above becomes your primary plan.
 

markc

Active Member
The presentation I went to was so filled with so many promises I knew I wasn't interested. My frat brother did dcp, and he was placed in a custodian role cleaning toilets at epcot. He hated it. He was told thay he would get a full time position when he graduated based on his evaluation upon graduation. What happened? The role never happened and now he is in law school.
EXACTLY. The on campus presentations are no different than a sleazy Hollywood agent telling random kids that he's going to make them a Hollywood star! The buzzword they constantly use in the presentations are "We're a fortune 500 company...that's going to look AMAZING on your resume". I hate to burst anybody's bubbles, but selling popcorn or cleaning toilets is the same at a Fortune 500 company as it is at a local dive bar. It doesn't give you an edge on your resume. Trust me on this. Within TWDC, being part of the WDWCP can sometimes be more of a detriment based on it's reputation.
 

jyn erso

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
No
Fair question. No I personally did not. But I know 100's of individuals who did and know many responsible for the program currently.



The difference between you and 1000's of other CP's, is that you have a plan in place that seems rooted in reality. I would encourage you to do it if you feel strongly that this is your best path to success in your career. I'd stress though, Disney's Professional Internships are incredibly competitive (especially the internships that don't require previous WDWCP participation) and if your career hinges upon obtaining one, just evaluate it seriously before the above becomes your primary plan.
See, this was the only part of my life plan. I'm currently undeclared with my major, but leaning towards English, since there's so much I can do with it. It's a long story, but I wasn't planning on attending college until major circumstances in my life changed and I started attending last winter (and I'm so happy I am!)

I plan on taking a few classes in education to see if I enjoy them, and if I do I'll consider getting my teaching license and going from there. I would really love to be at Imagineering one day, though. I know it's a long shot but I also think I can do it. It's what I've dreamed of since I was 11 or 12 and watching Disney Park special reruns. While I would love to do a PI, I don't think it's the end-all-be-all of my plans. I'll certainly try, but if I don't, I have other options, too.
 

jyn erso

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
No
I applaud that you are remaining positive.
Thank you! It's difficult to be, but I have faith I'll return to Orlando soon. At least I hope!

Once Florida's curve starts to flatten, maybe Disney will begin contacting CPs. They did have us fill out a survey, but that might have been to just reassure us all at the time, lol.
 

lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
I would really love to be at Imagineering one day, though. I know it's a long shot but I also think I can do it. It's what I've dreamed of since I was 11 or 12 and watching Disney Park special reruns.
Looking beyond Disney is one of the best things that those with dreams of Disney can do. Walt Disney Imagineering isn’t the only company out there doing “Imagineering” work, sometimes even for Disney.
 

jyn erso

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
No
Looking beyond Disney is one of the best things that those with dreams of Disney can do. Walt Disney Imagineering isn’t the only company out there doing “Imagineering” work, sometimes even for Disney.
Oh, I know. And I'll definitely keep my options open, you know? But I think Disney will expose me to a lot of other career paths I wasn't even aware of.
 

markc

Active Member
Looking beyond Disney is one of the best things that those with dreams of Disney can do. Walt Disney Imagineering isn’t the only company out there doing “Imagineering” work, sometimes even for Disney.
Indeed - it's why Disney (for years now) has been outsourcing many "imagineering" projects to firms in Orlando and Los Angeles. And the great thing about working at those firms as opposed to Disney, is that you get exposure to not just Disney projects, but Universal, Merlin, SeaWorld, etc.
 

Tom Morrow

Well-Known Member
It's frustrating when WDWMagic users go out of their way to belittle the jobs of the very people that make the WDW run. Yay.

So here's a different, less cynical perspective on the WDWCP.

The truth is that the experience and what you get out of it varies from person to person. Participants doing quick service foods, custodial, some merch positions, etc - are probably not going to enjoy their jobs much unless they're huge Disney nuts who are just happy to be there. Others, like attractions operations and entertainment, may absolutely love their jobs. A CP working at Kilimanjaro Safaris or Rise of the Resistance is going to have a hell of a lot more "wow" factor from their experience than someone who changes trash bins. It also helps if you are sociable and take the opportunity to meet lots of people and network. These factors are why some people leave and never return and others rave about it forever.

Is it a resume builder? If you're 18-22 and your only work experience is stuff around your hometown and/or college, then yes, it is.

Is it a path to a professional internship with Disney? If you perform well in your role, network, and know what you want, you have a better chance of being accepted for a professional internship.

Is it a trap? Well, that depends. Lots of participants have such a great time on their program that they decide to move to Orlando and work full time. What they quickly find is that living here and depending on the job for support rather than as an activity of sorts on the CP does not carry the same level of adventure and fun as the program, and the jobs quickly become more of just a job. Also, while some folks do get lucky and move up quickly, for every person this happens to, there are many more that stagnate for years, and before you know it, you're in your late 20's still doing the same level of work you did on the program.

So to me, I do feel the program is a valuable "real world" learning experience and a great, memorable experience in general for most participants. Just, try to avoid the trap of wanting to relive that feeling for years. Use it as an experience builder and/or a stepping stone to something bigger.
 

larryz

Expert Thread Derailleur
Premium Member
It's frustrating when WDWMagic users go out of their way to belittle the jobs of the very people that make the WDW run. Yay.

So here's a different, less cynical perspective on the WDWCP.

The truth is that the experience and what you get out of it varies from person to person. Participants doing quick service foods, custodial, some merch positions, etc - are probably not going to enjoy their jobs much unless they're huge Disney nuts who are just happy to be there. Others, like attractions operations and entertainment, may absolutely love their jobs. A CP working at Kilimanjaro Safaris or Rise of the Resistance is going to have a hell of a lot more "wow" factor from their experience than someone who changes trash bins. It also helps if you are sociable and take the opportunity to meet lots of people and network. These factors are why some people leave and never return and others rave about it forever.

Is it a resume builder? If you're 18-22 and your only work experience is stuff around your hometown and/or college, then yes, it is.

Is it a path to a professional internship with Disney? If you perform well in your role, network, and know what you want, you have a better chance of being accepted for a professional internship.

Is it a trap? Well, that depends. Lots of participants have such a great time on their program that they decide to move to Orlando and work full time. What they quickly find is that living here and depending on the job for support rather than as an activity of sorts on the CP does not carry the same level of adventure and fun as the program, and the jobs quickly become more of just a job. Also, while some folks do get lucky and move up quickly, for every person this happens to, there are many more that stagnate for years, and before you know it, you're in your late 20's still doing the same level of work you did on the program.

So to me, I do feel the program is a valuable "real world" learning experience and a great, memorable experience in general for most participants. Just, try to avoid the trap of wanting to relive that feeling for years. Use it as an experience builder and/or a stepping stone to something bigger.
To my mind, the prestige of the DCP (assuming there is any) is the "elite" nature of being selected out of the masses who apply. That can help an otherwise "also ran" resumé.
 

DarkMetroid567

Well-Known Member
I will say, I took almost little to nothing out of my CP. If it hadn't been for the 3 or so friends I'm still in contact with, it would have been an absolute waste.
 

DarkMetroid567

Well-Known Member
Is it a path to a professional internship with Disney? If you perform well in your role, network, and know what you want, you have a better chance of being accepted for a professional internship.

Is it a trap? Well, that depends. Lots of participants have such a great time on their program that they decide to move to Orlando and work full time. What they quickly find is that living here and depending on the job for support rather than as an activity of sorts on the CP does not carry the same level of adventure and fun as the program, and the jobs quickly become more of just a job. Also, while some folks do get lucky and move up quickly, for every person this happens to, there are many more that stagnate for years, and before you know it, you're in your late 20's still doing the same level of work you did on the program.
This is an incredibly good take. I think the main issue with a lot of CPs is that a lot of them don't realistically plan ahead for what their lives will really be like at Disney after 3 months.
 

disney4life2008

Well-Known Member
This is an incredibly good take. I think the main issue with a lot of CPs is that a lot of them don't realistically plan ahead for what their lives will really be like at Disney after 3 months.
Well because alot put so much into Disney. Get the poition but once it's done it's done. I would say a good percentage get back to reality. But there is a segment that hate the experience or think Disney is going to hire them full time.
 

danitaytay

Well-Known Member
I think you’re also forgetting that the CPs essentially run the parks after 5 PM. What goes on at night in the parks would not be possible without them. You can ask any CP or full timer and they will admit it. The CPs are an essential backbone to Disney. They do so much for the company. And you’re not going to find a group of kids more passionate about Disney and making magic than them.
 

markc

Active Member
It's frustrating when WDWMagic users go out of their way to belittle the jobs of the very people that make the WDW run. Yay.
I dont believe anybody is belitting the jobs that are offered to individuals at WDW. What many are doing, however, is putting them in perspective to what they are versus what they are being marketed as to individuals working hard in college as enticement of putting their studies on hold.

The truth is that the experience and what you get out of it varies from person to person. Participants doing quick service foods, custodial, some merch positions, etc - are probably not going to enjoy their jobs much unless they're huge Disney nuts who are just happy to be there. Others, like attractions operations and entertainment, may absolutely love their jobs. A CP working at Kilimanjaro Safaris or Rise of the Resistance is going to have a hell of a lot more "wow" factor from their experience than someone who changes trash bins. It also helps if you are sociable and take the opportunity to meet lots of people and network. These factors are why some people leave and never return and others rave about it forever.
The problem is, the "cool" jobs are few and far between. It's for this reason you aren't told where you are working until you get there. Disney knows many would back out of the job if they were given a little advanced warning of what their position would be. That, to me, is also what partially makes it a trap.

Is it a resume builder? If you're 18-22 and your only work experience is stuff around your hometown and/or college, then yes, it is.
By that definition, anything is a resume builder. The point of the criticism is that there are much better, relevant, and valuable ways to build your resume if you're working hard for a specific career. Whether you sell popcorn at your local movie theater in a small town in Nebraska or in Epcot, it's the same thing to a hiring manager at any company and doesn't provide any value on landing a job that most college students are striving for.


Is it a trap? Well, that depends. Lots of participants have such a great time on their program that they decide to move to Orlando and work full time. What they quickly find is that living here and depending on the job for support rather than as an activity of sorts on the CP does not carry the same level of adventure and fun as the program, and the jobs quickly become more of just a job. Also, while some folks do get lucky and move up quickly, for every person this happens to, there are many more that stagnate for years, and before you know it, you're in your late 20's still doing the same level of work you did on the program.

So to me, I do feel the program is a valuable "real world" learning experience and a great, memorable experience in general for most participants. Just, try to avoid the trap of wanting to relive that feeling for years. Use it as an experience builder and/or a stepping stone to something bigger.
Could agree more with the above.
 
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