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Coronavirus and Walt Disney World general discussion

Wendy Pleakley

Well-Known Member

Since I can't read the article, does it say to what degree COVID is impacting them?

Regardless of that factor, perhaps this will be a wakeup call for those unwilling to have their children mask, lest they be seen as "mean" or treating them "unfairly".
 

Bastet

Active Member
Bit late, this is oscar
IMG-20210628-WA0004.jpeg
 

Disney Analyst

Well-Known Member
Since I can't read the article, does it say to what degree COVID is impacting them?

Regardless of that factor, perhaps this will be a wakeup call for those unwilling to have their children mask, lest they be seen as "mean" or treating them "unfairly".

I was able to put the article in reader view to access:


“Children younger than 12, the only portion of the population that cannot be protected by a COVID-19 vaccine, now make up a growing share of new coronavirus cases in Florida.

This young age group experienced a 52% increase in new cases for the week ending July 1 from a week earlier — rising to 1,471 cases from 968. The average increase across all age groups was 35%.

Test positivity increased 46% in Florida children under 12 over the last week, the highest percentage increase of all age categories.
Children, however, still represent only about 9% of new COVID cases in Florida, and it’s too early to tell whether the rise will continue into future weeks.

“This is the group we have to keep our eyes on because they can’t be protected through vaccination,” said Jason Salemi, associate professor of epidemiology at the University of South Florida.

On the heels of a holiday weekend, public health experts will track new cases and hospitalizations closely, particularly with evidence that the Delta variant has made its way into 34 counties in Florida. Children remain at far less risk than adults for severe complications or death from COVID-19. Nationwide, fewer than 2% of pediatric COVID-19 cases have led to hospitalizations.

But because young children are ineligible for vaccination, they are susceptible to the highly contagious Delta variant. So far, 30 children who are 12 or under have been infected by the Delta variant in Florida, and none of them were hospitalized, state records show.

“We will have to see if this is a one-week blip or a long-term increase resulting from the Delta variant’s increase in prevalence in the state,” Salemi said. “We will have to continue to monitor.”

Nicole Slilat of Cooper City says she’s not taking risks.

Slilat drove her children to New Jersey this week instead of flying out of concern her 11-year-old son Ethan has not been vaccinated. Her 13-year-old daughter Maya has not been vaccinated yet, but will be before school starts, Slilat said.

“I feel guilty ... one I can protect and the other I cannot,” she said. “We all go out and have a great time and I am not fearful because I am vaccinated, but if someone gets sick, it’s likely it will be him.”

In Florida, teens ages 12 to 19 had the highest positivity rate of any age group during the past week at 6.7%. Only the most heavily vaccinated subgroups — 50 and older — had a positivity less than 5%

Pediatricians say they are seeing an uptick in patients testing positive.

“What I tell parents is although children don’t tend to get as sick as grandparents, they can still get sick,” said Dr. Tommy Schechtman, president and CEO of Pediatric Partners in Palm Beach Gardens, Jupiter and Boca Raton. “Everyone needs to practice good public health measures when someone in the family is not vaccinated.”

With the Delta variant, symptoms differ from the original strain of COVID-19 and may resemble a bad cold with a runny nose and sore throat. Schechtman advises parents to proceed as if a child who has these symptoms has COVID unless they receive a negative test result.
Schechtman says the more Floridians who get vaccinated, the more children will be protected from COVID. “Hopefully by fall they will be able to lower the age limit,” he said. “But in the meantime, we’ll all need to practice good techniques to keep our children safe.”
 

Tony the Tigger

Well-Known Member
Well, as they say, that escalated quickly:


And it was very predictable - just like it’s predictable we are unlikely to see a downturn in cases after a holiday weekend.

But apparently people wearing masks are hysterical or something.
 

lisa12000

Well-Known Member
What is “living under lockdown”?
Living with buisnesses unable to open, only being able to meet 6 people max indoors from three households whether that be at home or the pub, limited capacities at stadia for sport, no festivals, theatre at 50% capacity, nightclubs shut, at weddings no dancing, singing or mingling of tables and sitting with masks on and limited numbers, limited numbers st wakes, masks mandates still on, virtually no travel in or out
 

James J

Well-Known Member
Sorry if this has been posted. From BBC news article this AM. Shows the decline in severity of cases during current UK surge. Also, looks like the rate of increase in UK is starting to slow. Good news.

View attachment 570019

Yep, my area seems to have finally stopped doubling in cases and as of yesterday, the percentage of positive tests over the last 7 days has actually gone down. Hospitalisations are still going up a bit but thankfully the deaths are still at 0.

1625649607045.png
 

lisa12000

Well-Known Member
Yep, my area seems to have finally stopped doubling in cases and as of yesterday, the percentage of positive tests over the last 7 days has actually gone down. Hospitalisations are still going up a bit but thankfully the deaths are still at 0.

View attachment 570103
My area has gone up from 2/3 cases per day 10 days ago to having 67 per day this week! It’s just crazy the spread - abd it’s not in our schools very much - no real issues in them so god knows where it is
 

Kevin_W

Well-Known Member
Now Scotland has peaked hopefully possibly due to not only their schools closing for the summer last week (so no mass in school testing as we are doing) but also they went out the euros tournament so less people in pubs!

So, for the sake of the UK's pandemic surge, I should root for Denmark today so that all the English aren't in pubs during the finals? :D
 

DisneyCane

Well-Known Member
Well, as they say, that escalated quickly:


And it was very predictable - just like it’s predictable we are unlikely to see a downturn in cases after a holiday weekend.

But apparently people wearing masks are hysterical or something.
Are we seeing a large number of vaccinated people ending up in the hospital? If people elect to not be vaccinated and end up getting a severe illness from COVID, that's their problem, not mine.

With such a high percentage of cases being the Delta variant, I actually think that is a positive because, even in the areas with low vaccination rates, cases haven't increased that much even with that much more transmissible strain being dominant.
I was able to put the article in reader view to access:


“Children younger than 12, the only portion of the population that cannot be protected by a COVID-19 vaccine, now make up a growing share of new coronavirus cases in Florida.

This young age group experienced a 52% increase in new cases for the week ending July 1 from a week earlier — rising to 1,471 cases from 968. The average increase across all age groups was 35%.

Test positivity increased 46% in Florida children under 12 over the last week, the highest percentage increase of all age categories.
Children, however, still represent only about 9% of new COVID cases in Florida, and it’s too early to tell whether the rise will continue into future weeks.

“This is the group we have to keep our eyes on because they can’t be protected through vaccination,” said Jason Salemi, associate professor of epidemiology at the University of South Florida.

On the heels of a holiday weekend, public health experts will track new cases and hospitalizations closely, particularly with evidence that the Delta variant has made its way into 34 counties in Florida. Children remain at far less risk than adults for severe complications or death from COVID-19. Nationwide, fewer than 2% of pediatric COVID-19 cases have led to hospitalizations.

But because young children are ineligible for vaccination, they are susceptible to the highly contagious Delta variant. So far, 30 children who are 12 or under have been infected by the Delta variant in Florida, and none of them were hospitalized, state records show.

“We will have to see if this is a one-week blip or a long-term increase resulting from the Delta variant’s increase in prevalence in the state,” Salemi said. “We will have to continue to monitor.”

Nicole Slilat of Cooper City says she’s not taking risks.

Slilat drove her children to New Jersey this week instead of flying out of concern her 11-year-old son Ethan has not been vaccinated. Her 13-year-old daughter Maya has not been vaccinated yet, but will be before school starts, Slilat said.

“I feel guilty ... one I can protect and the other I cannot,” she said. “We all go out and have a great time and I am not fearful because I am vaccinated, but if someone gets sick, it’s likely it will be him.”

In Florida, teens ages 12 to 19 had the highest positivity rate of any age group during the past week at 6.7%. Only the most heavily vaccinated subgroups — 50 and older — had a positivity less than 5%

Pediatricians say they are seeing an uptick in patients testing positive.

“What I tell parents is although children don’t tend to get as sick as grandparents, they can still get sick,” said Dr. Tommy Schechtman, president and CEO of Pediatric Partners in Palm Beach Gardens, Jupiter and Boca Raton. “Everyone needs to practice good public health measures when someone in the family is not vaccinated.”

With the Delta variant, symptoms differ from the original strain of COVID-19 and may resemble a bad cold with a runny nose and sore throat. Schechtman advises parents to proceed as if a child who has these symptoms has COVID unless they receive a negative test result.
Schechtman says the more Floridians who get vaccinated, the more children will be protected from COVID. “Hopefully by fall they will be able to lower the age limit,” he said. “But in the meantime, we’ll all need to practice good techniques to keep our children safe.”
This article, which is not at all designed to panic people, neglected to point out that, in cases per 100k for the week, the under 12 age group (0% vaccinated) is essentially the same as the 60-64 age group (73% vaccinated). It continue to show that very young people have some kind of natural resistance to SARS-CoV-2 or at least a natural resistance to any kind of somewhat severe illness resulting from it.

We also need to stop calling positive tests "cases." Testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 is not the same as having a case of COVID-19. If 5 billion people were asymptomatically infected with SARS-CoV-2, it wouldn't be a health crisis.

When I had my COVID test that was required for a medical procedure, they tested for a bunch of other stuff also. I was positive for streptococcus. I didn't experience a single symptom and would have never known there was a bacteria colony living in my nasal passage. I didn't have a "case" of anything.

@Tony the Tigger feel free to be as anxious as you want about "the numbers" but until a large number of vaccinated people or children under 12 start getting severely ill, there is no issue to be concerned about from a public health perspective in my opinion.
 

Touchdown

Well-Known Member
Just because delta is becoming the dominant strain (which was bound to happen, evolution) doesn’t mean disaster is around the corner. The seven day case average nationwide has been decreasing for 3 days. While that may be a holiday lull, it may be the start of a trend too. My area of Wisconsin, for the first time in over a year, currently has 0 hospitalized patients.
 

ABQ

Well-Known Member
Just because delta is becoming the dominant strain (which was bound to happen, evolution) doesn’t mean disaster is around the corner. The seven day case average nationwide has been decreasing for 3 days. While that may be a holiday lull, it may be the start of a trend too. My area of Wisconsin, for the first time in over a year, currently has 0 hospitalized patients.
Insane media coverage of Delta is about to turn to Lambda. No idea what they will do once they surpass Zeta.
 

DisneyFan32

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
Yes
Are we seeing a large number of vaccinated people ending up in the hospital? If people elect to not be vaccinated and end up getting a severe illness from COVID, that's their problem, not mine.

With such a high percentage of cases being the Delta variant, I actually think that is a positive because, even in the areas with low vaccination rates, cases haven't increased that much even with that much more transmissible strain being dominant.

This article, which is not at all designed to panic people, neglected to point out that, in cases per 100k for the week, the under 12 age group (0% vaccinated) is essentially the same as the 60-64 age group (73% vaccinated). It continue to show that very young people have some kind of natural resistance to SARS-CoV-2 or at least a natural resistance to any kind of somewhat severe illness resulting from it.

We also need to stop calling positive tests "cases." Testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 is not the same as having a case of COVID-19. If 5 billion people were asymptomatically infected with SARS-CoV-2, it wouldn't be a health crisis.

When I had my COVID test that was required for a medical procedure, they tested for a bunch of other stuff also. I was positive for streptococcus. I didn't experience a single symptom and would have never known there was a bacteria colony living in my nasal passage. I didn't have a "case" of anything.

@Tony the Tigger feel free to be as anxious as you want about "the numbers" but until a large number of vaccinated people or children under 12 start getting severely ill, there is no issue to be concerned about from a public health perspective in my opinion.

Now I'm scared of Delta variant will make large surge of madness by end of the year. Then we will never get back to normal to get COVID-19 cases will go down way lower now because Delta variant ruins again as we will go wear masks and social distancing for years to end Delta variant so badly now. This is getting too crazy about now.:eek: We want to end the pandemic right now!
 
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Flugell

Well-Known Member
So, for the sake of the UK's pandemic surge, I should root for Denmark today so that all the English aren't in pubs during the finals? :D
Nooooooooooo! 🤪
To be fair Denmark is a lovely nation and full of friendly people and after the illness of Christian Eriksen I hope they do well - but not well enough to defeat us!
 

Heppenheimer

Well-Known Member
Another issue still would help those who cannot afford time off work or do not have easy transportation or childcare. Mostly I think we need people to speak out more about facts in ways they'd listen..... but hopefully FDA approval will get more.
I have a handful of patients who really do want the vaccine, but their work responsibilities are the main obstacle. Not so much that they can't spare the time required to get the vaccine, but it's difficult to coordinate the vaccine appointment with a day off afterwards to cover the inevitable sick day. Especially when they need to do it twice for the mRNA vaccines. This is particularly hard for utility workers, many of whom need to be on-call potentially 24/7. I think in these circumstances, the only solution would need to come from the HR departments to comenup with a schedule for their remaining unvaccinated (and motivated) workers. And even this won't help the independnt contractors.

And on another topic, I never could have predicted the animal storm I would unleash by posting a pic of our new Bernese puppy yesterday. But its been a tough 16 months, we all needed to have a little fun. And here's an encore:
20210705_163953.jpg
 

helenabear

Well-Known Member
I have a handful of patients who really do want the vaccine, but their work responsibilities are the main obstacle. Not so much that they can't spare the time required to get the vaccine, but it's difficult to coordinate the vaccine appointment with a day off afterwards to cover the inevitable sick day. Especially when they need to do it twice for the mRNA vaccines. This is particularly hard for utility workers, many of whom need to be on-call potentially 24/7. I think in these circumstances, the only solution would need to come from the HR departments to comenup with a schedule for their remaining unvaccinated (and motivated) workers. And even this won't help the independnt contractors.

And on another topic, I never could have predicted the animal storm I would unleash by posting a pic of our new Bernese puppy yesterday. But its been a tough 16 months, we all needed to have a little fun. And here's an encore:View attachment 570129
Thank you again for sharing your pup! I think this thread needed that!

Not surprised about some of your patients. Scheduling things definitely is a massive issue to overcome. Would be nice if businesses would offer a few extra sick days just for it. Or a financial incentive from somewhere to cover time off. Of course there is childcare issues too. I met someone while getting my son his 2nd dose who did schedule separately from spouse for shots since they had had covid prior and worried it would be worse as many reported. With 3 kids they couldn't afford to both be down at the same time. It's not all easy for everyone.
 

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