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Coronavirus and Walt Disney World general discussion

Heppenheimer

Well-Known Member
Probably because “everyone get healthy” isn’t a viable health plan in a pinch?

Totally agree. Which is why the downfall of the Disney buffet wouldn’t be a bad thing...

...but who are we kidding? Only a matter of time there.
I would like to start with at least normal portion sizes. Other than two of the higher-end restaurants, I don't think I was able to finish more than half a plate during my last trip to Disneyland.
 

Angel Ariel

Well-Known Member
The same emailed “warning” also included something about there being “very little risk” of a resurgence to those who are fully vaccinated. The CDC said the same thing, even with the delta variant. The Pfizer vaccine will likely be available by the fall for school children, so soon enough everyone will be able to get vaccinated.

The solution here is quite simple, and I fail to understand why some won’t get vaccinated. Part of me feels that if the virus resurges amongst the unvaccinated it’s their own fault.
I saw some concern recently that the fda is considering not approving emergency authorization for kids when those vaccines are ready.

I hope that will turn out to be inaccurate, as I absolutely want DD to get the vaccine as soon as one is available to her.
 

Mr. Moderate

Premium Member
You are right, but at this point consequences need to happen if the vaccine hesitant are to change their minds. I live in a very low vaccinated-rate state and I've heard every excuse in the book to reject the vaccine, all more ridiculous as the next. "It alters your DNA you know." "We're not going to see the true side-effects of the vaccine for 5-10 years." Blah, blah, blah.

Of course the ones most likely to get the shot are those who have suffered from the virus in some way - got sick themselves, lost a loved one, worked in an industry that was hurt by the virus, etc. It's those that lived in their little quarantine bubble watching Tucker Carlson every night that are screwing this up for the rest of us. So I say, let them suffer.
I enjoy reading your opinion as I do others on this topic and part of me agrees with you, but I want to point out something that I bolded. I firmly believe in people taking responsibility for their actions or in this case, their inactions, but your statement of let them suffer won't just fall on their shoulders. By their own reluctance, I call it stupidity in some cases, due to misleading information from certain sources in this country, will effect us all greatly. If rates do go up in the fall due to this variant and they just might, those unvaccinated people will cause a cascade event that could easily put us back in lockdown.

I dread this happening and honestly I fear it as this point, but sadly there's nothing we can do to get these misguided and in some cases, selfish people to get vaccinated. It's frustrating to say the least and I think too many are thinking that the virus is over and doing a end zone celebration. The Delta variant scares me and this virus seems to have more legs than a spider at this point.
 

Lilofan

Well-Known Member
Probably because “everyone get healthy” isn’t a viable health plan in a pinch?

Totally agree. Which is why the downfall of the Disney buffet wouldn’t be a bad thing...

...but who are we kidding? Only a matter of time there.
One of my favorite buffets was at Port Orleans 20 years ago for breakfast . All you can eat including grilled steak and beignets.
 

helenabear

Well-Known Member
I would like to start with at least normal portion sizes. Other than two of the higher-end restaurants, I don't think I was able to finish more than half a plate during my last trip to Disneyland.
I agree! One night I had chicken and waffles from Roaring Forks because our lunch choice failed me (even the mac n cheese had onions) so my lunch was a small snack and I finished that meal. Otherwise only Skipper Canteen was about 2/3 finished and their portion sizes were more average. I cannot have the fried chicken at Prime Time so they do grilled chicken instead and lighter sides. Literally 3 grilled chicken ******* were on my plate. I could have split that 3 ways (I only finished 1) I tend to do kid's meals at QS places as the portions are better and I can easily get fruit or veggies.
 

GoofGoof

Premium Member
I'm not of the opinion that universal health insurance would affect obesity rates at all, because that's largely a matter of leading a horse to water. And our society just isn't organized around encouraging the things that would reduce obesity. But it would help reduce some of the health consequences of obesity.
It’s a valid point. There are many additional fundamental changes needed on obesity alone. That being said a disproportionate number of people who suffered severe outcomes from Covid had less than adequate access to health care. Most likely many had underlying conditions they were not even aware of or untreated chronic health problems. If our plan going forward to prepare for pandemics is to “get everyone healthy” then we need to start with getting everyone access to basic medical care.
 

Communicora

Premium Member
The same emailed “warning” also included something about there being “very little risk” of a resurgence to those who are fully vaccinated. The CDC said the same thing, even with the delta variant. The Pfizer vaccine will likely be available by the fall for school children, so soon enough everyone will be able to get vaccinated.

The solution here is quite simple, and I fail to understand why some won’t get vaccinated. Part of me feels that if the virus resurges amongst the unvaccinated it’s their own fault.
A big concern is that there are vaccinated people for whom the vaccine won't be as effective (for example, older adults). In the UK, 1/3 of the deaths with the Delta variant were in fully vaccinated people.
 

helenabear

Well-Known Member
It’s a valid point. There are many additional fundamental changes needed on obesity alone. That being said a disproportionate number of people who suffered severe outcomes from Covid had less than adequate access to health care. Most likely many had underlying conditions they were not even aware of or untreated chronic health problems. If our plan going forward to prepare for pandemics is to “get everyone healthy” then we need to start with getting everyone access to basic medical care.
Not just health care but access to things like healthy food at reasonable costs. Lack of time and money play into lifestyles for many. So healthcare access is an issue, but the disparities in life affect it more. A doctor can only try to help a patient loose weight, control diabetes, reduce BP or cholesterol etc but they aren't able to fix the root of the issues at hand. Goes back to why some cannot vaccinate due to time or money. Programs only address some issues, not all.
 

James J

Well-Known Member
A good milestone has just been hit in the UK:

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DisneyDebRob

Well-Known Member
It’s a valid point. There are many additional fundamental changes needed on obesity alone. That being said a disproportionate number of people who suffered severe outcomes from Covid had less than adequate access to health care. Most likely many had underlying conditions they were not even aware of or untreated chronic health problems. If our plan going forward to prepare for pandemics is to “get everyone healthy” then we need to start with getting everyone access to basic medical care.
The proverbial “ nail on the head” you just hit. I laugh, or maybe cry not really sure when I read some of the posts here claiming.. “ well if everyone just took care of themselves.. blah blah. They may have a bit of a point when it comes to those in houses with white picket fences.. the 2 and a half kids..ands dog. They never ever seem to take into consideration the millions who don’t have good acces to healthcare.. or good healthy food.. or.. I can keep going. It’s not as easy as saying then move out and make a better life for yourself.. as they sit in their sunroom spouting it on internet boards.
Huge disproportionate numbers came from this area. Should we not care? Of course we should care and the answers go much deeper then lose weight. It’s a discussion for somewhere else of course.
 

Heppenheimer

Well-Known Member
I saw some concern recently that the fda is considering not approving emergency authorization for kids when those vaccines are ready.

I hope that will turn out to be inaccurate, as I absolutely want DD to get the vaccine as soon as one is available to her.
There are different voices within the FDA, and they're trying to project forward based on several targets that move independently of each other.

One of the debates is whether to allow an EAU for younger children based on safety data alone, since the efficacy is so well established in adults and teenagers, and there really isn't any reason to suspect children won't get the same immunity benefit. Part of this is probably because some wish to have the results in time for next winter, so that kids won't need to endure another year of classroom disruption, but now that the pandemic has calmed down considerably in the US, Finland and Spain (where most of the trials are taking place), they may not be able to reach the efficacy targets in time.

So, the debate comes down to should we wait longer for more complete efficacy data in children (the safety data, on the other hand, will be more than adequate) and perhaps jeopardize another school year, or jump ahead and allow the vaccines for children, who are less likely to suffer severe consequences than adults anyway, with murkier efficacy numbers so that we can safely get them back to school full time? All of this also assumes the safety data holds up, which seems pretty likely to me. And now that we've relaxed and eliminated almost all mitigation measures, do we just want to sit back and see what damage the delta variant can inflict in unvaccinated children?

I don't claim to have the answers for these questions, and fortunately, I don't sit on an FDA advisory panel.
 

GoofGoof

Premium Member
I saw some concern recently that the fda is considering not approving emergency authorization for kids when those vaccines are ready.

I hope that will turn out to be inaccurate, as I absolutely want DD to get the vaccine as soon as one is available to her.
EUA is only possible in an emergency. The benefit has to exceed the risk. There is some thought that if Covid cases drop low enough by September then there won’t be a true emergency anymore. This happened in Israel recently where they delayed approval for 12-15 year olds because cases there dropped so low. I think one aspect that should help ease people’s apprehension for kids under 12 is the lower dose being trialed now. The dose is 1/3 the adult dose so in theory should reduce adverse events and side effects. The trial they are running now may not show efficacy if nobody in the placebo group gets covid but as long as it shows the vaccines are safe I think they may approve it anyway based on the high efficacy in other groups.
 

GoofGoof

Premium Member
The proverbial “ nail on the head” you just hit. I laugh, or maybe cry not really sure when I read some of the posts here claiming.. “ well if everyone just took care of themselves.. blah blah. They may have a bit of a point when it comes to those in houses with white picket fences.. the 2 and a half kids..ands dog. They never ever seem to take into consideration the millions who don’t have good acces to healthcare.. or good healthy food.. or.. I can keep going. It’s not as easy as saying then move out and make a better life for yourself.. as they sit in their sunroom spouting it on internet boards.
Huge disproportionate numbers came from this area. Should we not care? Of course we should care and the answers go much deeper then lose weight. It’s a discussion for somewhere else of course.
Yeah, probably too far down the rabbit hole.
 

GoofGoof

Premium Member
5.4% of infections occurred in fully vaccinated people and 11% of hospitalizations and then a jump to 28.6% of deaths. My guess is that has more to do with age demographics than vaccine effectiveness. Of the 94.6% of infections that occurred in unvaccinated people the vast majority are probably in young people who may not even be eligible yet but are unlikely to die from Covid. A larger portion of fully vaccinated people are 65+ since they were the first to go and that group is at higher risk for death if they get covid. Breakthrough infection is still rare, but 12 people died. It is a concern.
 

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