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Politics Coronavirus and Walt Disney World general discussion

This thread contains political discussion related to the original thread topic

oceanbreeze77

Well-Known Member
I have a question for those that get the lucky first shot.
Does getting a extra dose guarantee that you get a second shot on time?

I was going to try to get a leftover shot myself but I don’t want to try for it unless it means I will also receive the second shot.
In LA county, the website says for second doses all you need is your vaccination record card and ID. No work ID or anything like that.
 

oceanbreeze77

Well-Known Member
I am sorry your side effects were so bad. A friend of mine who got Moderna had similar first shot but not as bad second. I have no idea how it works lol. The arm was my bad thing, enough to wake me, but not enough to stay away.

Do they schedule you for your 2nd shot?
No. They dont know what their stock schedule looks like so they are doing appointments week by week.
 

oceanbreeze77

Well-Known Member
Hope you feel better soon!
My parents got the Moderna yesterday..80 and 79. They had no problems at all, after the shot or today. They just told me they feel great. So weird how it effects some and not others.
My uncle and his wife, and my parents all got Pfizer and had no reaction. I did some research into it and interesting enough, found this

"Can side effects be more pronounced in people who are at higher risk of severe COVID-19 disease—i.e., people who are older, have comorbidities, etc.?

No—in fact, vaccine side effects have been less frequent and severe in adults older than 55 years in the vaccine trials."
 

Sirwalterraleigh

Premium Member
So now the goalposts have moved and we need enough people vaccinated for herd immunity before we approach a "degree of normality?"

How about a "degree of normality" in 3 months when the vast majority of people 65+ are vaccinated and 80% of the deaths cease?

Nobody will convince me that Fauci isn't on some kind of power trip which just got worse since Biden made him more important.

Eventually...it will happen...eventually
 

hopemax

Well-Known Member
So now the goalposts have moved and we need enough people vaccinated for herd immunity before we approach a "degree of normality?"

How about a "degree of normality" in 3 months when the vast majority of people 65+ are vaccinated and 80% of the deaths cease?

Nobody will convince me that Fauci isn't on some kind of power trip which just got worse since Biden made him more important.
This is what galls me. We have a President who downplayed the emergence of this virus. Acted as if it was a personal plot by the world to harm him personally. One who forced his advisors to walk on eggshells as not to upset him or make him feel stupid, to boil issues of vital National Security down to a couple of pages of graphics. One who degraded science, and expert analysis. The one who wrapped himself in an escalating blanket of lies about the election and his right to stay in office even though he lost a free and fair election.

After all of that, on the first working day of the new Presidency when we might finally get full and complete answers regarding our ability to fight this virus and have confidence in what was being said hadn't been run through some spin machine to make it more palatable to the President. After we learn that there is not any semblance of what adults would consider a full plan to vaccinate the population. The lack of a substantial plan, that will surely disrupt the timeline. The man who has spent a lifetime combating infectious diseases, because he says something you do not like and does not conform to your opinion on the state of things, *HE* is the one on a power trip?

We discussed this in December, when I was getting crap about the mask thing through 2021, that Dr. Fauci was saying THEN that next year's Thanksgiving he *hopes* will be more normal and people were upset with him too. When he mentioned that we might need upwards of 90% of the population to really reach herd immunity. I'm sorry you didn't listen to his November & December statements. He didn't move the goal posts. You object to his conclusion, with no evidence other than a disgusting presumption of his motives. As if anyone would get their jollies over telling people that this is going to continue to suck for a long time. As someone who recently felt they were being accused of vile motives I thought you might be more sensitive to those type of presumptions, but I guess not.

This virus has not and will not conform to a human timeline of when we want it to be over. No matter how much you or anyone else insists.


 

hopemax

Well-Known Member
And another thing. After this goes away and we begin to tally the continuing costs of this pandemic we can’t conceptualize beyond the deaths. The number of people who leave health care and education, the number of healthcare workers suffering from PTSD who need mental health support. The people on long term disability that tax payers will have to subsidize, the people on Medicaid, Medicare and even private insurance with long term expensive care needs because their vascular system is shredded and we will be paying for in higher premiums and costs for everyone... I don’t want to hear a WORD from anyone who believed “only the deaths” matter when it comes to paying those taxes or premiums.
 

helenabear

Well-Known Member
He’s gone. They let his wife and daughters come in. They made it in time. I’m glad they got to say goodbye.
So very sorry to hear.
No. They dont know what their stock schedule looks like so they are doing appointments week by week.
That's a bit unnerving but I hope it works well for you.

Yes, even in trials they showed less side effects for older people than young. Even in the early phases this was seen. So I admittedly was concerned when I went in and after being warned of worse effects for second shot at the trial itself (told so we wouldn't put side effects in covid diary). Really it wasn't that bad for me either time though, but my reactions to shots are never big outside of arm pain. I do have a large number of friends who work in or for the medical field and getting their vaccines. I'd say less are reacting poorly than I would expect too. So fingers crossed more do well with it!
 

Kevin_W

Well-Known Member
I know in Ohio they are starting school workers on Feb 1. My mom is a school bus driver and is scheduled on the 1st and then her second dose on March 1. They are really pushing to be back onsite by March 1st. I don't see that happening but my local school never shut down even with outbreaks in the schools.

Right, but that plan doesn't make sense. 5 weeks for immunity after Feb 1 isn't March 1. And they aren't vaccinating all 334,000 teachers/admins/janitors/bus drivers on Feb 1 anyway.

That said, my school is in hybrid in spite of cases (4 students at my daughters school positive in the past week) and I expect they will stay there. As studies have shown spread is not happening at the school - these people are picking it up outside so they would be getting sick regardless if the school was open.

The debate of teachers vs 65+ is tough for priority. I would say that teachers are more essential than the average 65-year-old, but the average teacher is less likely to die from the disease than an older person.
 

Think Tink

Premium Member
In the Parks
No
Right, but that plan doesn't make sense. 5 weeks for immunity after Feb 1 isn't March 1. And they aren't vaccinating all 334,000 teachers/admins/janitors/bus drivers on Feb 1 anyway.

That said, my school is in hybrid in spite of cases (4 students at my daughters school positive in the past week) and I expect they will stay there. As studies have shown spread is not happening at the school - these people are picking it up outside so they would be getting sick regardless if the school was open.

The debate of teachers vs 65+ is tough for priority. I would say that teachers are more essential than the average 65-year-old, but the average teacher is less likely to die from the disease than an older person.
Oh I completely agree. Some staff aren’t getting their first dose until halfway through February so they won’t even get their next shot until mid March.

Our school is offering a hybrid but very few actually went out from what i was told. My nephew was to start preschool this year but my sister didn’t want any extra risk as my BIL has asthma.

It’s hard to figure out who gets priority. Not something I’d ever want to decide. Hopefully we can keep increasing vaccinations per day because every weekend it drops to under 10,000 and it’s discouraging to see.
 

pixie225

Member
What is "bungled?" That it is hard to get an appointment? The reporting delays to the CDC make the doses used look a lot worse than reality. Pfizer and Moderna can't magically make 500 million doses appear and J&J and Astrazeneca have yet to apply for EUA.
Surely the U.S. has the capability of "opening" plants to manufacture more vaccine, if the government would fund it. There are plenty of vacant facilities that could be used. NY converted places into making ventilators when needed, as did other states. This, imho, should be a top priority - especially since Pfizer is a U.S./NY-based company.
 

MisterPenguin

Rumormonger
Premium Member
People are getting confused:

The Biden administration's base goal is 100M doses (jabs in arms) in 100 days. When that was announced, the rate of jabbing was shockingly low such that it seemed likely that that goal wasn't going to be achieved. So, the Biden administration set a baseline goal to ramp up jabbing.

When you talk about the number of people fully immunized, that's 50M because it takes two jabs.

When you talk about "this Summer" or "June" you're talking about the totality of all jabs to get us to herd immunity, not what's happening short term in the next 100 days.

Pfizer and Moderna should be providing more than 100M doses in 100 days, but the question is, can we get those doses into people, or will states continue to be a mess in their delivery system? The current administration's goal is to help states jab people at the rate that doses are produced... for now, over the next 3 months.

By the end of 3 months, other company's doses should be in the system, and the system should be able to handle the increased jab-load.

The states, scrambling on their own, have just started to reach 1M jabs/day, making 100M jabs in 100 days likely.
 

rustincohle

Member
I'm from the UK, so my perspective may be slightly different, but I do think health officials - whose job is not traditionally communication, so I have some sympathy - have often poorly communicated what the end goal is. Once every adult has been offered the vaccine, it's going to be supremely difficult to maintain any mask or social distancing restrictions. People know that the virus will never go away fully, and that the vaccine doesn't offer 100% protection, but they also know that we lived with other diseases ok in the past and that a degree of risk is simply part of life. I think the vast majority will feel that, once everyone has had (or been offered) the vaccine, that's the big tipping point for what level of risk is acceptable to go back to normal life.

In the UK, it's been reported that all adults will be offered the vaccine as soon as June if things continue to go well with the rollout. I don't think the US is that far behind, but may be wrong. So I think that by later in the Autumn (let's say October), all but the loosest restrictions - if not all restrictions - should surely be gone (assuming the vaccine protects against new variants, which it seems from early data it does)? Interested to hear if there are reasons why that can't be the case.

In any event, I've booked a WDW trip for two weeks at the start of December, so you can't say I won't put my money where my mouth is! :D
 

drizgirl

Well-Known Member
Right, but that plan doesn't make sense. 5 weeks for immunity after Feb 1 isn't March 1. And they aren't vaccinating all 334,000 teachers/admins/janitors/bus drivers on Feb 1 anyway.

That said, my school is in hybrid in spite of cases (4 students at my daughters school positive in the past week) and I expect they will stay there. As studies have shown spread is not happening at the school - these people are picking it up outside so they would be getting sick regardless if the school was open.

The debate of teachers vs 65+ is tough for priority. I would say that teachers are more essential than the average 65-year-old, but the average teacher is less likely to die from the disease than an older person.
Both are critical. But if we can't get kids in classrooms without teachers being vaccinated, then I say we should have made them second in line behind medical staff actually working with Covid patients. Education is in crisis. My parents are over 80 and desperate to be vaccinated. They would gladly give up their spots to get kids in classrooms.
 

Polkadotdress

Well-Known Member
What is "bungled?" That it is hard to get an appointment? The reporting delays to the CDC make the doses used look a lot worse than reality. Pfizer and Moderna can't magically make 500 million doses appear and J&J and Astrazeneca have yet to apply for EUA.

Pfizer and Moderna should be providing more than 100M doses in 100 days, but the question is, can we get those doses into people, or will states continue to be a mess in their delivery system? The current administration's goal is to help states jab people at the rate that doses are produced... for now, over the next 3 months.
Bungled.

The Villages "super site" has been temporarily shuttered as they have exhausted all their vaccine supply, leaving 7000 pre-registered people up in the air. The first 5 days of operation saw 4000 vaccinations administered at that site, resulting in rave reviews from the local community. But now, there is no more vaccine in the immediate pipeline for this location. When asked why there was a challenge with the supply, Gov Desantis pointed blame at the federal distribution system.

So, here we have $ being paid to the "Global Medical Response" company to host the vaccination site. And, many disappointed and very frustrated seniors whose appointments were abruptly cancelled.

Bungled.
 

Disstevefan1

Well-Known Member
Good news and bad news:

Good news: Amazon wants to help with the vaccination of nearly 800,000 of its employees who are considered essential workers (delivery and supermarket).

Bad news: It seems that *maybe* Amazon is offering aid in general to the administration, but, OTOH, the letter sent sure sounds like it's only concerned about getting their own workers vaccinated through an internal effort.

Good news: This is better than nothing. And essential workers do need to get ahead of the line over others.

Bad news: No way could Amazon have suggested this to the Trump administration since Trump hates Bezos and has looked for ways to hurt him.
Amazon held off on purpose simply because the Trump Admin would have welcomed it. If Amazon thought the Trump Admin would have rejected it, that would have been mainstream media gold.
 

Disstevefan1

Well-Known Member
How exactly would Amazon get involved in vaccine distribution on their own? Did the prior administration reach out to them and ask for help and they refused? Do we know they didn’t offer help before Joe and Kam? I don’t get this line of thinking. Seems like a major case of sour grapes.
If Amazon offered help to the Trump Admin and they rejected it, it would have been all over the mainstream media for sure..
 

GoofGoof

Premium Member
Surely the U.S. has the capability of "opening" plants to manufacture more vaccine, if the government would fund it. There are plenty of vacant facilities that could be used. NY converted places into making ventilators when needed, as did other states. This, imho, should be a top priority - especially since Pfizer is a U.S./NY-based company.
They can’t really do that. Part of the emergency use authorization is a detailed quality control inspection around the manufacturing facilities and process. They can’t just start manufacturing vaccine at another site without going through the full blown process and it would take months to ramp that up. They started that process for the current facilities months before the trial ended in the hopes they got approval. On the supply chain side Pfizer has contracts with suppliers for raw materials as well. From what I understand some of the raw materials are also limited. Dry ice for shipping is one of them. Pfizer has enough purchased to meet their targets.

One of the worst vaccine disasters in US history occurred when the government rushed manufacturing of the polio vaccine and a lab in CA accidentally used live virus instead of a dead one. Thousands contracted polio from the vaccine and several were paralyzed or killed. After that the government increased scrutiny on the manufacturing process.
 

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