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Coronavirus and Walt Disney World general discussion

techgeek

Well-Known Member
Is it down to $400 now or has that not been passed yet?

Florida just recently announced it will provide the $300/wk federal funds from the President's executive order, but will not be adding the $100 optional state provided 'matching funds'. No timeline on payments actually kicking in, but they will be retroactive to August 1st. Apparently there's questions on how long the federal funds will last, the best guess from Tallahassee is only another 3 or 4 weeks from the announcement, so perhaps 2 months total benefit from that source.

A 'real' unemployment extension is still hung up in the Senate.
 

Lilofan

Well-Known Member
Florida just recently announced it will provide the $300/wk federal funds from the President's executive order, but will not be adding the $100 optional state provided 'matching funds'. No timeline on payments actually kicking in, but they will be retroactive to August 1st. Apparently there's questions on how long the federal funds will last, the best guess from Tallahassee is only another 3 or 4 weeks from the announcement, so perhaps 2 months total benefit from that source.

A 'real' unemployment extension is still hung up in the Senate.
The extension the governor gave for evictions was Aug 1. All this is hair raising for all impacted.
 

Heppenheimer

Well-Known Member
I haven't had time to respond, but this new line of logic that "they had comorbidities, so it shouldn't be counted as COVID-19" might be the single most ignorant thing I have read from the deniers yet. Let me outline what can happen when someone get seriously ill with COVID-19.

Let say our example is named "Joe". I've changed the name, but the case is real, and in no ways atypical. He's 65 years old and works as a mechanical engineer. He is overweight, but not obese. He smoked for about 20 years but quit in his 40s. He has high blood pressure, diabetes, high cholesterol and chronic kidney disease, but all are relatively mild and well controlled on medications. A few years ago, Joe had a mild heart attack, which was treated with a stent. He lost some of his cardiac capacity, but with medication and cardiac rehabilitation, he only notices this when he performs parcticularly strenuous physical activity. He remains fully employed, and has an active social life. In other words, although Joe probably isn't quite as healthy as he should be for his age, he by no means is an outlier in America, but he certainly is not at death's door. With proper medical care, he could live another 10-20 years. He recently canceled a trip to Disney World with his grandchildren due to the pandemic.

Unfortunately, Joe caught COVID-19 from one of his co-workers, a younger employee who packed into a bar as soon as they re-opened. He developed a fever and increasing severe shortness of breath. He reported to a local ER and was diagnosed with pneumonia based on a chest xray that showed his lungs were filled with fluid. Based on the severity of his symptoms and poor vital signs, Joe is hospitalized, and his COVID-19 test later returns positive. His already weakned heart now needs to pump much harder due to the illness, and his cardiac muscles start to die because the metabolic demand on them is greater than can be met with the reduced availability of blood oxygen (in medical terms, this is a type II non-ST elevation myocardial infarction, ie NSTEMI, ie, a type of heart attack). Joe goes into ventricular fibrillation, and although he is quickly revivied, the sudden reduction in cardiac output puts his already compromised kidneys into failure. Because his lungs are filled with fluid, the usual treatment for acute kidney failure, flooding the patient with IV fluid, will not work, so he needs to start emergency dialysis. As Joe's immune system tries in vain to fight the infection, his platelet count starts to drop from a dreaded complication called systemic intravascular coagulation. This throws a clot to his brain, and causes a large stroke. Recognizing the futility of further intensive care, his wife tearfully agrees to withdraw treatment, and Joe quickly sucumbs.

So, the cause of death is multi-organ failure, including kidney failure, stroke, and myocardial infarct. Although Joe wasn't in the best of health, he was living an active and productive life just before his sudden death. His underlying co-morbidities made him more vulnerable to COVID-19, but to say his death shouldn't count in the COVID numbers is absurd and a shows complete ignorance of what goes on when someone becomes severely ill.
 

NickMaio

Well-Known Member
I haven't had time to respond, but this new line of logic that "they had comorbidities, so it shouldn't be counted as COVID-19" might be the single most ignorant thing I have read from the deniers yet. Let me outline what can happen when someone get seriously ill with COVID-19.

Let say our example is named "Joe". I've changed the name, but the case is real, and in no ways atypical. He's 65 years old and works as a mechanical engineer. He is overweight, but not obese. He smoked for about 20 years but quit in his 40s. He has high blood pressure, diabetes, high cholesterol and chronic kidney disease, but all are relatively mild and well controlled on medications. A few years ago, Joe had a mild heart attack, which was treated with a stent. He lost some of his cardiac capacity, but with medication and cardiac rehabilitation, he only notices this when he performs parcticularly strenuous physical activity. He remains fully employed, and has an active social life. In other words, although Joe probably isn't quite as healthy as he should be for his age, he by no means is an outlier in America, but he certainly is not at death's door. With proper medical care, he could live another 10-20 years. He recently canceled a trip to Disney World with his grandchildren due to the pandemic.

Unfortunately, Joe caught COVID-19 from one of his co-workers, a younger employee who packed into a bar as soon as they re-opened. He developed a fever and increasing severe shortness of breath. He reported to a local ER and was diagnosed with pneumonia based on a chest xray that showed his lungs were filled with fluid. Based on the severity of his symptoms and poor vital signs, Joe is hospitalized, and his COVID-19 test later returns positive. His already weakned heart now needs to pump much harder due to the illness, and his cardiac muscles start to die because the metabolic demand on them is greater than can be met with the reduced availability of blood oxygen (in medical terms, this is a type II non-ST elevation myocardial infarction, ie NSTEMI, ie, a type of heart attack). Joe goes into ventricular fibrillation, and although he is quickly revivied, the sudden reduction in cardiac output puts his already compromised kidneys into failure. Because his lungs are filled with fluid, the usual treatment for acute kidney failure, flooding the patient with IV fluid, will not work, so he needs to start emergency dialysis. As Joe's immune system tries in vain to fight the infection, his platelet count starts to drop from a dreaded complication called systemic intravascular coagulation. This throws a clot to his brain, and causes a large stroke. Recognizing the futility of further intensive care, his wife tearfully agrees to withdraw treatment, and Joe quickly sucumbs.

So, the cause of death is multi-organ failure, including kidney failure, stroke, and myocardial infarct. Although Joe wasn't in the best of health, he was living an active and productive life just before his sudden death. His underlying co-morbidities made him more vulnerable to COVID-19, but to say his death shouldn't count in the COVID numbers is absurd and a shows complete ignorance of what goes on when someone becomes severely ill.
Thank you.......
The downplay of covid on this forum is staggering.
 

Touchdown

Well-Known Member
I haven't had time to respond, but this new line of logic that "they had comorbidities, so it shouldn't be counted as COVID-19" might be the single most ignorant thing I have read from the deniers yet. Let me outline what can happen when someone get seriously ill with COVID-19.

Let say our example is named "Joe". I've changed the name, but the case is real, and in no ways atypical. He's 65 years old and works as a mechanical engineer. He is overweight, but not obese. He smoked for about 20 years but quit in his 40s. He has high blood pressure, diabetes, high cholesterol and chronic kidney disease, but all are relatively mild and well controlled on medications. A few years ago, Joe had a mild heart attack, which was treated with a stent. He lost some of his cardiac capacity, but with medication and cardiac rehabilitation, he only notices this when he performs parcticularly strenuous physical activity. He remains fully employed, and has an active social life. In other words, although Joe probably isn't quite as healthy as he should be for his age, he by no means is an outlier in America, but he certainly is not at death's door. With proper medical care, he could live another 10-20 years. He recently canceled a trip to Disney World with his grandchildren due to the pandemic.

Unfortunately, Joe caught COVID-19 from one of his co-workers, a younger employee who packed into a bar as soon as they re-opened. He developed a fever and increasing severe shortness of breath. He reported to a local ER and was diagnosed with pneumonia based on a chest xray that showed his lungs were filled with fluid. Based on the severity of his symptoms and poor vital signs, Joe is hospitalized, and his COVID-19 test later returns positive. His already weakned heart now needs to pump much harder due to the illness, and his cardiac muscles start to die because the metabolic demand on them is greater than can be met with the reduced availability of blood oxygen (in medical terms, this is a type II non-ST elevation myocardial infarction, ie NSTEMI, ie, a type of heart attack). Joe goes into ventricular fibrillation, and although he is quickly revivied, the sudden reduction in cardiac output puts his already compromised kidneys into failure. Because his lungs are filled with fluid, the usual treatment for acute kidney failure, flooding the patient with IV fluid, will not work, so he needs to start emergency dialysis. As Joe's immune system tries in vain to fight the infection, his platelet count starts to drop from a dreaded complication called systemic intravascular coagulation. This throws a clot to his brain, and causes a large stroke. Recognizing the futility of further intensive care, his wife tearfully agrees to withdraw treatment, and Joe quickly sucumbs.

So, the cause of death is multi-organ failure, including kidney failure, stroke, and myocardial infarct. Although Joe wasn't in the best of health, he was living an active and productive life just before his sudden death. His underlying co-morbidities made him more vulnerable to COVID-19, but to say his death shouldn't count in the COVID numbers is absurd and a shows complete ignorance of what goes on when someone becomes severely ill.

Somewhere back on other pages I made the same argument before. It’s amazing, I’m used to being ignored, I’m used to people believing they can WebMD to do my job, but now all of a sudden people want to do my job and fill out death reports 🙄.
 

MisterPenguin

Rumormonger
Premium Member
1598875815018.png


1598875863310.png
 

MisterPenguin

Rumormonger
Premium Member
When someone says death rates this year are in line with previous years... they lie:

1598875943665.png


See how that first spike correlates to the initial spikes in the tri-state area? See the second spike (which health officials warned us about) correlates to the Southern states' spike?

 

Disstevefan1

Well-Known Member
When someone says death rates this year are in line with previous years... they lie:

View attachment 494024

See how that first spike correlates to the initial spikes in the tri-state area? See the second spike (which health officials warned us about) correlates to the Southern states' spike?


How could death rates be in line? During the initial outbreak of the CCP virus, patients were immediately put on ventilators and died.

Normally, ventilators are the LAST attempt at saving or prolonging life, patients most of the time do not live to come off the ventilators.
 

Heppenheimer

Well-Known Member
How could death rates be in line? During the initial outbreak of the CCP virus, patients were immediately put on ventilators and died.

Normally, ventilators are the LAST attempt at saving or prolonging life, patients most of the time do not live to come off the ventilators.
Not true at all. A ventilator is usually only a temporizing measure, and most patients placed on one (for any reason) successfully wean off within 1-5 days.
 

Touchdown

Well-Known Member
Not true at all. A ventilator is usually only a temporizing measure, and most patients placed on one (for any reason) successfully wean off within 1-5 days.

If you are put on a ventilator for a non surgical reason it is because you have developed Acute Respiratory Failure, and without the ventilator you will die in minutes-hours. A lot of the time we are able to reverse this with the extra time a ventilator gives us but does not change the severity of your illness. The Intensive Care Unit is where we treat critically ill patients, everyone who is on a ventilator in an ICU is by definition critically ill.

On average it takes a person 1 week to recover for each day they are on a ventilator, 4 days means you won’t be 100% for a month. It is not something to brush aside.
 

Heppenheimer

Well-Known Member
If you are put on a ventilator for a non surgical reason it is because you have developed Acute Respiratory Failure, and without the ventilator you will die in minutes-hours. A lot of the time we are able to reverse this with the extra time a ventilator gives us but does not change the severity of your illness. The Intensive Care Unit is where we treat critically ill patients, everyone who is on a ventilator in an ICU is by definition critically ill.

On average it takes a person 1 week to recover for each day they are on a ventilator, 4 days means you won’t be 100% for a month. It is not something to brush aside.
True, yes, but I was responding to the statement that most people on a ventilator will never come off one, which is certainly not the case.
 

Touchdown

Well-Known Member
True, yes, but I was responding to the statement that most people on a ventilator will never come off one, which is certainly not the case.

Most people do, however when it comes to Covid that does not appear to be true. I don’t have the exact numbers, but from anecdotal evidence and the fact that guidelines from Covid explicitly discourage using ventilators if at all possible I would be shocked if we have a 50% recovery in Covid patients that end up on a vent.
 

rowrbazzle

Well-Known Member
When someone says death rates this year are in line with previous years... they lie:

View attachment 494024

See how that first spike correlates to the initial spikes in the tri-state area? See the second spike (which health officials warned us about) correlates to the Southern states' spike?


Great info. I wonder why so many states have below normal numbers of deaths at the beginning of the year.
 

LukeS7

Well-Known Member
Great info. I wonder why so many states have below normal numbers of deaths at the beginning of the year.
Not 100% sure of NYT's methodology, but it seems like they might be using the upper bound threshold for excess deaths from the CDC's chart as their baseline.

EDIT: After a closer look, NYT is using the "Average expected number of deaths" as the baseline for theirs
 
Last edited:

MisterPenguin

Rumormonger
Premium Member
A drop in testing but a positivity rate that is in line with the last week or so. Interesting.

Less tests overall recently are occurring (whether it's due to the latest CDC kerfuffled recommendation, <shrug>).

Which could mean those who have symptoms are making up a larger portion of those who are taking tests, which, in turn, increases the positivity rate; and that's why it's plateauing rather than going down.

Which I hope is the case. OTOH, we seen plenty of these second wave states keep a plateaued positivity rate for months with a slow burn going through the population without abatement.

C'mon Florida, wear your masks, stop the parties, and get it under control!
 

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