Bob Chapek Confirms Disney Will Overhaul Epcot

MisterPenguin

President of Animal Kingdom
Premium Member
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Frozen 2 comes out this year!! Where can it fit in Future World??
In Imagination, you use your imagination to build snowmen and other things.

In the Land, you get introduced into the long-gone glaciers and the ice cutters who once harvested them.

In the Sea, you learn the dangers of 19th century sailing on the North Sea.

In Spaceship Earth, you marvel at the world largest snowball.

In Test Track, you test the design of your sleigh.

In Mission: Space you get a panoramic view of the Aurora Borealis.

In Wonders of Life, you find out what happens if you don't have a skull or bones.
 

J. D.

Well-Known Member
In Imagination, you use your imagination to build snowmen and other things.

In the Land, you get introduced into the long-gone glaciers and the ice cutters who once harvested them.

In the Sea, you learn the dangers of 19th century sailing on the North Sea.

In Spaceship Earth, you marvel at the world largest snowball.

In Test Track, you test the design of your sleigh.

In Mission: Space you get a panoramic view of the Aurora Borealis.

In Wonders of Life, you find out what happens if you don't have a skull or bones.
Bob Iger: SOLD!!!
 

HauntedMansionFLA

Well-Known Member
In Imagination, you use your imagination to build snowmen and other things.

In the Land, you get introduced into the long-gone glaciers and the ice cutters who once harvested them.

In the Sea, you learn the dangers of 19th century sailing on the North Sea.

In Spaceship Earth, you marvel at the world largest snowball.

In Test Track, you test the design of your sleigh.

In Mission: Space you get a panoramic view of the Aurora Borealis.

In Wonders of Life, you find out what happens if you don't have a skull or bones.
All great ideas! What’s Chapek’s e-mail so I can forward this information to him? As always, giving @MisterPenguin full credit ;):D:p
 

MrHorse

Member
Also, very very skeptical that Seimens ever offered free monorails. Those monorails would be worth A LOT of money... way more than Disney would have sought to charge for a sponsorship renewal.
The following is completely anecdotal. That said:
A friend of mine was working with Siemens around that time. According to her, Siemens pulled their sponsorship (at least partially) because Disney declined a contract for new monorails.

I certainly have no proof or corroboration, but that seems a lot more realistic to me than Siemens pending over backward and offering free monorails just to keep their name on a ride. By the same token, I can't imagine Disney turning down such a one-sided offer. I dunno what it would cost to replace the monorails, but I'm sure it's far above the cost of sponsoring an attraction.
 

DanielBB8

Well-Known Member
Most "rumors" are people on here who make stuff up and/or quote people who made stuff up.

Disney is a publicly traded, shareholder-owned, SEC-regulated company. What this means is that MANY decisions are regulated by the government to a large degree.... and most major expenditures are reported publicly (although this can be buried in documents most people never take the time to read.) Disney it literally owned by retirement funds!

Bottom line... Test Track didn't cost anywhere near $250M. I'm not sure where you are getting your information, but I'd suggest reading SEC filings as a place to find actual information. Also, very very skeptical that Seimens ever offered free monorails. Those monorails would be worth A LOT of money... way more than Disney would have sought to charge for a sponsorship renewal.
SEC filing don’t necessarily breakdown the cost of each attraction. There’s certainly a number that cuts down on revenue that produces the income. SEC filing isn’t a tax return either. How much Disney actually pays for capitals costs is still as much as a mystery as it can be lumped with other expenses like employees that’s on a different line.

Let’s just say I’m using a large number. With the standard markups, sponsorships require a lot of cash.
 

DanielBB8

Well-Known Member
The cost of big ticket capital improvements are routinely discussed by executives. There are interviews (you can find them) where people who would know (Paul Pressler back in the day) discussed cost figures for attractions like Mission Space (which was $100M or thereabouts, and that involved a whole new building from the ground up, and a completely new ride system). TT was neither of those things... The budget for Everest was also widely discussed. The budget for Star Wars ($1 BILLION per park) has also been revealed by executives...
That’s different than chiding me for not reading the SEC filing. Discussing how much things cost is fun.
 

peter11435

Well-Known Member
The cost of big ticket capital improvements are routinely discussed by executives. There are interviews (you can find them) where people who would know (Paul Pressler back in the day) discussed cost figures for attractions like Mission Space (which was $100M or thereabouts, and that involved a whole new building from the ground up, and a completely new ride system). TT was neither of those things... The budget for Everest was also widely discussed. The budget for Star Wars ($1 BILLION per park) has also been revealed by executives...
Agree with everything here except TT was a completely new ride system.
 

lazyboy97o

Well-Known Member
The following is completely anecdotal. That said:
A friend of mine was working with Siemens around that time. According to her, Siemens pulled their sponsorship (at least partially) because Disney declined a contract for new monorails.

I certainly have no proof or corroboration, but that seems a lot more realistic to me than Siemens pending over backward and offering free monorails just to keep their name on a ride. By the same token, I can't imagine Disney turning down such a one-sided offer. I dunno what it would cost to replace the monorails, but I'm sure it's far above the cost of sponsoring an attraction.
The big problem with this story is that it doesn’t really make sense. Siemens does not, nor have theymake an ALWEG-style monorail. Why would he larger company be so aggressive about building, for the first time, a somewhat niche product?
 

peter11435

Well-Known Member
No, TT was a derivative of the EMV ride system developed for Indiana Jones Adventure at DL.... as is Radiator Springs Racers and Journey to the Center of the Earth at Tokyo.
I am aware. I thought you meant it was not a new installation as in a repurposed side system.

Although honestly I wouldn’t really consider TT any less a new ride system than M:S. Both were derivatives of previous technology. Virtually every technology present in M:S was already developed for other ETC products. In the case of TT, the adaptations and advancements also needed to be handled mostly by Disney itself.
 
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Missing20K

Well-Known Member
SEC filings are infallible? Good info. Let me go tell the execs at Enron, Global Crossing, Madoff Securities, WaMu, Lehman Bros., etc., etc., etc......

Also, SEC definitely doesn't have a problem with false filings or anything:
Fake Warren Buffett filings shows the SEC still has a problem
Fake Avon filing puts spotlight on SEC
Former finance chief for Washington company charged with falsified SEC filings

The SEC puts an incredible amount of trust in the companies to report their numbers correctly. And even they don't catch every instance of false info.

Not saying DIS is, or is not, filing improperly, just pointing out the fact that relying on SEC filings for much of anything could potentially be a fool's errand. They are very, very much, "buyer beware."
 

MrHorse

Member
The big problem with this story is that it doesn’t really make sense. Siemens does not, nor have theymake an ALWEG-style monorail. Why would he larger company be so aggressive about building, for the first time, a somewhat niche product?
You got me. Like I said, this is all second-hand info. Maybe Siemens wanted a deal for something more substantial, like bringing the monorail system up to whatever their current flagship tech is? I could see that being a legit point of disagreement. Siemens wants a big showpiece installation. Disney wants something cheaper or less dramatic. Maybe it's all just internal gossip that has traveled way too far.

Regardless, at this point, I'm just speculating about stuff that's off-topic anyway. Probably not much point carrying this thread any further.
 

mikejs78

Premium Member
SEC filings are infallible? Good info. Let me go tell the execs at Enron, Global Crossing, Madoff Securities, WaMu, Lehman Bros., etc., etc., etc......
Many of whom faced legal trouble because of the false filings. It's illegal to report false information to the SEC. And yes, people break the law. But I put more credence in an SEC filing than a marketing blog post, for example. Generally you have to assume that they are accurate unless evidence dictates otherwise. It is a bit more than buyer beware.

Sure. But those things tend to be caught pretty quickly. And aren't from the companies themselves.
 
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