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News Beauty and the Beast sing-along coming to Epcot's France Pavilion

LittleBuford

Well-Known Member
Possibly quite true. Perhaps they didn’t want to compete with Liberty Square.

I suspect that the decision not to create a more eye-catching American pavilion also reflects the fact that the park is already in the USA. If the idea is to showcase the wider world, it would make sense to let the other countries shine more (while still giving the American pavilion pride of place and a uniquely elaborate attraction).
 

Emm

Active Member
I remember going in 1983 and all 3 films would have hour long lines that would go out to the main path around the lagoon. Those days are gone. My only wish is this being used as a theatre for a sing along allows it to stay a theatre for a beautiful film. Will it continue to show both, i hope so
 

marni1971

WDW History nut
Premium Member
I suspect that the decision not to create a more eye-catching American pavilion also reflects the fact that the park is already in the USA. If the idea is to showcase the wider world, it would make sense to let the other countries shine more (while still giving the American pavilion pride of place and a uniquely elaborate attraction).
Well, it’s a better looker than it’s original design!
 

Bocabear

Well-Known Member
I hate to say it - the American pavilion is perhaps the dullest in the showcase. The food is uninspiring, the lack of a real street scape, and the single note colonial building convey very little about the US.
Thank God for the attraction housed within...Which is the most amazing theatrical animatronic show ever produced... I too wish they would do something more with the food aspect...A nicer table service restaurant hosted by a celebrity chef reprsent the four corners of the United states or something like that... Maybe add a quick service that is food trend inspired.. Food truch fare without the food trucks...with seating ..Not sure what they could feature in shopping since our American products are available all over the world... Maybe dust off some of the proposals from Disney's America...Add the InDustrial Revolution rolloer coaster... So much could be done if they wanted to expand it. But for now I would really be happy if the UK, Germany, and Japan all got their missing attractions that were planned for them... with the addition of Ratatouille and Coco added to the Donde Es Donald ride, it would be a really engaging park...
 

larryz

My Last Trip was in 2018
Premium Member
I wonder how many seats are filled for the showings of Schindler's List at The Holocaust Museum? Maybe they should replace it with some episodes of Hogan's Heroes.
Are you aware that Werner Klemperer, John Banner and Robert Clary (Klink, Schultz and LeBeau) were victims of Nazi persecution/apprehension prior to and during WWII?

You were just being sarcastic, but Hogan's Heroes would be a somewhat and strangely appropriate tribute to Holocaust survivors.
 

Marc Davis Fan

Well-Known Member
I’m most concerned by how this show will affect the experience of IdF and the rest of the pavilion. I already mentioned the signage out front, but I also wonder how the IdF queue and theater will change. Hopefully they won’t be adding lots of BatB images and such... Do any of our insiders have ideas/info on this?

Also, do we have an idea of when this will open? 2020 along with Rat? Will IdF temporarily close while they’re working on this?

Finally, I think it would make the most sense to play IdF in the morning/early-afternoon (like say 11am-2pm or 3pm) and play this new show in the later-afternoon/evening. First, most people are in WS later in the day, and second, more people will be upset if they miss the BatB show (unfortunately), so having it later will allow CM’s to say “come back later” rather than “it’s over for the day, you missed it.”
 

WondersOfLife

Blink, blink. Breathe, breathe. Day in, day out.
I'm sure a lot of people find WS movies boring. Just wish they would've gone someplace else they don't find boring then, rather than demanding Disney's greatest park ever gets beers 'n toons 'n coasters 'cause this here park is a theme park.
For the record, I completely agree with you. I'm just seeing both sides of the problem, and the main problem here is that if people did go someplace else, then the cost to operate these attractions for next to no one who actually enjoys them compared to almost any other half decent attraction at Epcot just doesn't pay off for Disney. The typical unsuspecting theme park guest does not actually do research on the park they're going to. They see a picture for Soarin' and test Track and think "lets go there!" only to be very much underwhelmed with literally everything else the park has to offer.

If there were more of us, than more of them, then the argument of "They can just go somewhere else" would be reasonable. But, sadly, that is not the case. And the more guest complaints about these movies being "boring," the more likelihood that these definitely won't last much longer.

I've just grown to accept that. And I'm not too upset about it anymore as I used to be, because... I love the history of Epcot. But I'm tired of justifying its existence to those who don't understand it in the modern age. So yes, bring on the IPs. I just hope they're good quality attractions.
 

Disneyhead'71

Well-Known Member
Are you aware that Werner Klemperer, John Banner and Robert Clary (Klink, Schultz and LeBeau) were victims of Nazi persecution/apprehension prior to and during WWII?

You were just being sarcastic, but Hogan's Heroes would be a somewhat and strangely appropriate tribute to Holocaust survivors.
Yes I knew that. And that Donald Bevan, who wrote the play Stalag 17 that was the basis of the movie of the same name and eventually inspired Hogan's Heroes was also a prisoner of war in Germany during WWII.
 

doctornick

Well-Known Member
There's a middle ground. While I totally agree that people defend EPCOT and mourn it more than they have any right to, perhaps a new updated film would be nicer rather than an IP. Something about France itself rather than a fairy tale in it.

Ironically, though, there is supposedly a new film being developed to replace IDF.
 

doctornick

Well-Known Member
Where are these people who find Circlevision movies so boring seeing other movies that completely surround the audience?

Personal opinions, but one of the reason I really enjoy the Circlevision films (especially China) is the unique presentation. To me, regardless of the content of the various films, that puts them already ahead as an interesting attraction versus IDF which is closer to a more standard film people see all the time.
 

doctornick

Well-Known Member
I doubt they will. The reason FEA opens early is because of Akershus doing breakfast. The only other thing that opens is the bakery in France, again for people to get breakfast on their way into the park.

Just a guess, but once Ratatouille opens, I'd expect that pavilion to be open early as well. Which then would beg the question if they want to open up other pavilions early.
 

82EPCOT82

Member
Just a guess, but once Ratatouille opens, I'd expect that pavilion to be open early as well. Which then would beg the question if they want to open up other pavilions early.

I also wonder if Epcot will change it's usual 9 pm closing time until later when this, Rataouille, and GOTG open.
 

Sir_Cliff

Well-Known Member
I definitely see what you're saying. I guess I'm just less bothered by IPs than others are. They've been used since the earliest days for cheap and low-tech attractions (the Teacups and Fantasyland dark rides spring to mind), and some of the best attractions we have are based on them (e.g., ToT, Splash Mountain). This isn't to say that I would welcome Moanaland over Adventureland--a Disney park wouldn't be a Disney park without the non-IP content and theming. But neither am I opposed to certain attractions and areas (on a limited and judicious basis) being modified or replaced in response to changing times and conditions. No doubt the Country Bear Jamboree is susceptible in this regard, and though I'll be devastated to see it go if they ever decide to get rid of it, the fault will lie with guests for turning away from the attraction rather than with Disney for giving the punters what they want.
I'm also not religiously anti-IP and agree that sometimes it works great. For example, I think Ratatouille will be a nice addition and wish they would put Coco into the Mexico pavilion.

The case of Coco is an illustrative one, though. Here they have a film that just made $800 million worldwide, was well reviewed, won two Oscars, is beloved by many people, and that fits perfectly into one of their theme parks. It doesn't move merchandise and isn't a potential franchise, though, so the ROI calculations don't work and the proposed attraction doesn't go ahead. Imagine if someone at WDI proposed a massive thrill ride based on either Song of the South or The Twilight Zone today! I find it impossible to imagine that the creative possibilities would override the relative weakness of the franchises in getting those proposals green lit. I'm also not sure someone making those sorts of pitches would survive very long!

I still obviously enjoy the parks and the bones are still there of the original approach to the parks to make them interesting and differentiate the parks from one another. As everything is becoming more and more brand-driven, though, I find it harder to get particularly excited about what they're doing. Then again, I got into Disney because of the parks rather than the other way around.
On Mickey's birthday of all days!
Not only that, I share a birthday with Mickey!
 
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LittleBuford

Well-Known Member
Not only that, I share a birthday with Mickey!

I'm moving this up top so I can start with the most important thing: Happy Birthday! 🍰

The case of Coco is an illustrative one, though. Here they have a film that just made $800 million worldwide, was well reviewed, won two Oscars, is beloved by many people, and that fits perfectly into one of their theme parks. It doesn't move merchandise and isn't a potential franchise, though, so the ROI calculations don't work and the proposed attraction doesn't go ahead. Imagine if someone at WDI proposed a massive thrill ride based on either Song of the South or The Twilight Zone today! I find it impossible to imagine that the creative possibilities would override the relative weakness of the franchises in getting those proposals green lit. I'm also not sure someone making those sorts of pitches would survive very long!

You're right. In the current climate, it does seem that the strength of a franchise can matter more than the aptness of the IP itself. That said, Ratatouille can again be counted as an exception, and one that makes me hopeful that we may yet see a return to the more daring and creative approach exemplified by ToT and Splash Mountain. (To be clear, I'm not suggesting that Ratatouille is on a par with either of these two greats!)

I still obviously enjoy the parks and the bones are still there of the original approach to the parks to make them interesting and differentiate the parks from one another. As everything is becoming more and more brand-driven, though, I find it harder to get particularly excited about what they're doing. Then again, I got into Disney because of the parks rather than the other way around.

The bolded sentence may help to explain the differing attitudes to what's going on. For me, Disney came before the parks and is what determines my attachment to them. I am not a theme-park fan in general, and that may explain why the boosted IP presence at WDW doesn't bother me all that much.
 

Sir_Cliff

Well-Known Member
Well whadayaknow, I do too! Happy birthday!
Thanks! Happy birthday to you too!

I'm moving this up top so I can start with the most important thing: Happy Birthday! 🍰
Aww, thanks!

You're right. In the current climate, it does seem that the strength of a franchise can matter more than the aptness of the IP itself. That said, Ratatouille can again be counted as an exception, and one that makes me hopeful that we may yet see a return to the more daring and creative approach exemplified by ToT and Splash Mountain. (To be clear, I'm not suggesting that Ratatouille is on a par with either of these two greats!)

The bolded sentence may help to explain the differing attitudes to what's going on. For me, Disney came before the parks and is what determines my attachment to them. I am not a theme-park fan in general, and that may explain why the boosted IP presence at WDW doesn't bother me all that much.
I can see that this would make a big difference, and I do wonder how many visitors these days are there because they love Disney more than the parks in and of themselves. When I first visited Disneyland and all this began, Beauty & the Beast was just coming out in theatres which is suggestive of the fact that Disney was on the cusp of becoming the cultural behemoth that it soon became. Indeed, I vividly remember wondering before we visited what they could possibly have at Disneyland as I didn't think Disney had really made many big films. What they did have blew my little 10 year-old mind! Perhaps in some way the parks had to be able to stand on their own creatively as a Fox & the Hound Land wasn't going to bring the hoards running? Nowadays the dynamic may well be the reverse: crowds show up wanting to see their favourite film and are disappointed if it's not represented.

Who knows. Either way, I'll remain bitter and twisted!
 

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