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News Announced: Mary Poppins Attraction in UK Pavilion

disneygeek90

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
Yes
I don't get the love affair with Poppins. Sure, it's a classic. But the second half is nearly unwatchable and hardly takes place in a visual landscape setting worthy of World Showcase.
 

Jones14

Well-Known Member
I don't get the love affair with Poppins. Sure, it's a classic. But the second half is nearly unwatchable and hardly takes place in a visual landscape setting worthy of World Showcase.
It’s all dependent on what you’re looking for. Poppins is written by one of the most famous British writers ever, and is widely associated with British culture by Americans (which is the primary audience of Disney theme parks).

Brave is neither of those things, but the entire movie takes place in Scotland and is centered around Scottish culture. It’s all about whether you favor the source or the end product in terms of what needs to be the root of the connection back to the country.
 

disneygeek90

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
Yes
It’s all dependent on what you’re looking for. Poppins is written by one of the most famous British writers ever, and is widely associated with British culture by Americans (which is the primary audience of Disney theme parks).

Brave is neither of those things, but the entire movie takes place in Scotland and is centered around Scottish culture. It’s all about whether you favor the source or the end product in terms of what needs to be the root of the connection back to the country.
I've never been a huge Poppins fan. I appreciate the movie in terms of the strides and progress and importance in Walt's career, but in 2017, almost 2018, it just doesn't quite have the stamina for me. It actually just isn't a good movie after the first 30 minutes.

That being said, I am interested in how the remake does and hoping for a few less weird, drawn out, slow scenes.
 

Rlandrigan

Active Member
Sigh. All I have to add on this is that when we went to the art of Disney exhibit at the Chicago Museum of Science and Industry, both my kids - my daughter was very wee at the time - we absorbed in the displays on Mary Poppins. They both LOVE the movie, and I see many kids captured by it as well. So, in short, hush.:)

Brave just doesn't have enough, sadly. I love the movie, but it shows in the soundtrack - one amazing too short song and that's effectively it. Poppins is the only logical ride, crossing fingers it's up to par.
 

njDizFan

Well-Known Member
I don't like the direction its going, but the further infusion of character IP is happening. This is the best possible addition under the new direction.
Ugh...If had to make a choice I still would have to side with Brave. I know we have talked this au nauseam for 140 pages. And of course so much depends on execution.

What I want when I walk out of a WS attraction is a deeper understand of the country. I don't expect a complex historical treatise but maybe a few moments where I could say I learned something or had a deeper understanding of the host country.

Brave I think could fit that bill, once again if executed properly. Although I would be in favor a kinetic ride system, a well done film would at least fit the edutainment bill ( my preference over an existing IP attraction).
 

MisterPenguin

President of Animal Kingdom
Premium Member
What proposed concept is this referring to?
Just a slightly snarky retort to the idea that if it's not historical education, it doesn't belong in Epcot. The pavilions of WS are anchored by restaurants which give a literal taste of the culture, but aren't historical education. Or if one wants to argue that they are historical education, then they are no more so than a ride set in that culture. The UK pavilion is a pub, shops, and UK rock band covers as it is. I don't recall there being a historical museum there. A Poppins ride ain't changing anything. And I'd like to know what exactly a Brave ride could teach you.
 

disneygeek90

Well-Known Member
In the Parks
Yes
Just a slightly snarky retort to the idea that if it's not historical education, it doesn't belong in Epcot. The pavilions of WS are anchored by restaurants which give a literal taste of the culture, but aren't historical education. Or if one wants to argue that they are historical education, then they are no more so than a ride set in that culture. The UK pavilion is a pub, shops, and UK rock band covers as it is. I don't recall there being a historical museum there. A Poppins ride ain't changing anything. And I'd like to know what exactly a Brave ride could teach you.
I don't know what the concept was, but I would have hoped the Brave ride could have showed the landscape and rich culture, specifically the old Celtic culture and folklore, from back in that day. What Poppins can teach well... there's always a spoonful of sugar.
 

Magic Feather

Well-Known Member
I don't know what the concept was, but I would have hoped the Brave ride could have showed the landscape and rich culture, specifically the old Celtic culture and folklore, from back in that day. What Poppins can teach well... there's always a spoonful of sugar.
If they gave a hoot about incorporating a folklore based UK IP, I would be riding past an animatronic Arthur pulling a sword out of the stone.
 

njDizFan

Well-Known Member
Just a slightly snarky retort to the idea that if it's not historical education, it doesn't belong in Epcot. The pavilions of WS are anchored by restaurants which give a literal taste of the culture, but aren't historical education. Or if one wants to argue that they are historical education, then they are no more so than a ride set in that culture. The UK pavilion is a pub, shops, and UK rock band covers as it is. I don't recall there being a historical museum there. A Poppins ride ain't changing anything. And I'd like to know what exactly a Brave ride could teach you.
Food, pop art/fashion, architecture and music are definitely important aspects of the culture of a country. That is often the first step into a new culture that can be digested by the masses. And that is why all of those are represented in all the pavilions. The next step would be something with deeper influence like philosophy, religion, and the history of the peoples and leaders/governments. That is where I think the France, Canada and China films come into play.

A new attraction in a WS pavilion should shoot for that 2nd level of understating. American Adventure being the best example. I think a Brave attraction could at least transport you to a time or place that gleams some historical perspective of the peoples of Scotland. Again Mary Poppins not so much...
 
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