A Spirited 15 Rounds ...

egg

Well-Known Member
I like that Frontierland in Paris is all one land. No offshoots like Liberty Square, New Orleans Square, Critter Country, Mystic Point, Grizzly Gulch, heck, Galaxy's Edge, etc. It's all one land. The park still has five lands, not nine. In my opinion, that helps drive home the constrast between the different areas of the park.

Hopefully they're figuring out where to place a Splash Mountain. :)

Well, not necessarily that either...
Do you know and have the ability to share whether Battle Escape will require 3D glasses? Understand if you cannot.
 
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FigmentJedi

Well-Known Member
I like that Frontierland in Paris is all one land. No offshoots like Liberty Square, New Orleans Square, Critter Country, Mystic Point, Grizzly Gulch, heck, Galaxy's Edge, etc. It's all one land. The park still has five lands, not nine. In my opinion, that helps drive home the constrast between the different areas of the park.

Hopefully they're figuring out where to place a Splash Mountain. :)
They had plans to do it without the Song of the South characters.
 

2351metalcloud

Active Member
Remember Gargoyles? The entire existence of that show is based on Eisner rejecting the idea of buying Marvel in the 90s because he had full confidence that Disney could make up their own superhero universe.
That sounds plausible to me as Darkwing Duck came out soon after Batman in 1989, but do you have a source form where you learned this?

Universal was the one to be bought in that period... not the one looking to buy a fledgling studio that needed financing.
I had thought that Comcast had purchased Universal a year before 2009. So, yes they wouldn't have had as much money to completely buy Marvel before the Comcast purchase.

you are so far off in your comparisons its making my head hurt just trying to break it down in a way that even touches the remote place you are at.

The Marvel of 2008 was nothing like the Marvel of the 90s... nor even the Marvel of 5 years prior...
You replied to a post that mentioned Marvel going bankrupt by saying "People weren't actually all that interested in 'comic book' stuff, that had been kind of cordoned off as niche and dying." I was pointing out evidence that I think goes against that idea.

I'm not really sure what time you are referring to by "'comic book' stuff, that had been kind of cordoned off as niche and dying" if around when Marvel went bankrupt isn't the time you were referring to. If you are talking about 2008, that doesn't seem to make much sense as The Dark Knight was the highest grossing movie in 2008 with Iron Man in the top 10 and Spiderman 3 and 300 in the top 10 highest grossing movies in 2007.

Well you weren't the guy signing on the line saying "yes, please go spend 300+ million dollars on unproven content" - so I'm sure the courage needed seems trivial to you.
Maybe there is something to this that I'm not seeing. To me, if person x thinks 1: [Disney spending 4 billion dollars to buy Marvel is an obviously good idea due in large part to the large number of characters that have appeared in print and electronic media created by them that could appear in future movies and tv shows] then it still doesn't seem to make much sense to me for person x to think 2:[it is courageous for Disney to spend 300+ million dollars on one or more movies starring some of the characters from this print and/or electronic media].

Edit:
[I found something that mentions something about Disney wanting to use Gargoyles at least to partly make something akin to a superhero universe:

www.comicmix.com/2008/07/17/interview-greg-weisman-talks-gargoyles/

There was actually a mandate from Disney to create an action universe on the level of DC or Marvel comics.
]
 
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2351metalcloud

Active Member
That was an intentional short sighted decision made during the second half of the Eisner year. With the acquisition of these brands, Disney, both the company and the BRAND, have been hemmed into a corner, not unlike a multi brand car conglomerate like GM.

...

Disney hasn't endured for almost 100 years as General Entertainment, nor will it.
I think Marvel has a fairly wide variety of things they have made comics about that they could make movies or tv shows about although not necessarily with all of them them as part of their MCU superhero series, but so far they've I'd say they have made modern style action-superhero movies and a space-science fiction action movie.

LucasFilm has a bit more limited history in what they have made the comics division of Marvel however that is just their history just like with the studios division of Marvel. Still there is some variety in their history: American Graffiti (coming of age comedy-drama), Willow (high fantasy), Star Wars (what I'd say is some kind of combination of fantasy and 'space opera', Labyrinth (fantasy), Strange Magic (animated fantasy), and some movies inspired more by old Hollywood movies than the previously mentioned like the Radioland Murders (inspired by old comedy-mystery movies), Indiana Jones (inspired by old Hollywood adventure movies and probably some old books with similar stories), and Red Tails (somewhat inspired by old war movies).
 

the.dreamfinder

Well-Known Member
I think Marvel has a fairly wide variety of things they have made comics about that they could make movies or tv shows about although not necessarily with all of them them as part of their MCU superhero series, but so far they've I'd say they have made modern style action-superhero movies and a space-science fiction action movie.
Marvel, the company, has always been a mess. Ike Perlmutter, who led the company out of bankruptcy in the mid 90’s, came from the toy world and he aggressively shaped Marvel into a boy’s brand because he can better sell toys one gender would want. The toys in turn influenced everything else at Marvel and how children see Marvel, regardless of the comics. Since the acquisition, Ike pushed hard against creating merchandising with the female characters like Black Widow and Gamora, arguing that their inclusion would be a turn off for boys. Obviously, this is super dumb, but Ike never thought Marvel had to change its MO.

Lucasfilm is just SW and Indy now. However, having multiple women in influential positions of power, many of whom grew up with it as fans, has helped them recognize that it’s not just for boys.
 
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The Empress Lilly

Well-Known Member
I like that Frontierland in Paris is all one land. No offshoots like Liberty Square, New Orleans Square, Critter Country, Mystic Point, Grizzly Gulch, heck, Galaxy's Edge, etc. It's all one land. The park still has five lands, not nine. In my opinion, that helps drive home the constrast between the different areas of the park.
That's a very interesting thought.

Another one of the blessings of DLP's underinvestment. The park is still as designed, so coherent, its distinct themes not watered down.
The contrast between the lands was deliberate, greatly helped by each land having its own lead designer. The downside is that the different lands feel less part of a single design than the MK (did :cry:).

Also, a tenner says Bob decided today on Marvel Land replacing the western third of WDSP and Lucas/Star Wars Land in DLP between Adventure and Frontierland.
 

FigmentJedi

Well-Known Member
That's a very interesting thought.

Another one of the blessings of DLP's underinvestment. The park is still as designed, so coherent, its distinct themes not watered down.
The contrast between the lands was deliberate, greatly helped by each land having its own lead designer. The downside is that the different lands feel less part of a single design than the MK (did :cry:).

Also, a tenner says Bob decided today on Marvel Land replacing the western third of WDSP and Lucas/Star Wars Land in DLP between Adventure and Frontierland.
I thought the plan for Parisian Galaxy's Edge was gonna be putting in Discoveryland adjacent to Star Tours
 

The Empress Lilly

Well-Known Member
#teardownthispark

Villages Nature looks nice though. Sorta like if 70’s Disney management had created a large affordable, read moderate/value, hotel complex with a rich array of amenities not unlike Ft Wilderness.
Indeed!

I can't believe DLP never build an indoor waterpark. That sounds exactly what the resort needs to lure in families from Northwest Europe for a few days.

The contrast between DLP - WDSP drives home better than anything on the planet the difference between pre- and post 1994 Disney. Night and day. Jaw-dropping design vs plain rubbish. There are only a few years between the parks, but the contrast couldn't be bigger. If anybody thinks the fans merely imagine a drop in quality between classic and later Disney, take the 200 meter walk.

Will be interesting what will happen in Paris. Fitzgerald's promise is to double DLP in size, and Bob has pledged the billions needed now that the resort is fully Disney owned. Go see it now before it is DLP 2.0. The window to see classic DLP is closing.
 

The Empress Lilly

Well-Known Member
But surely adding Chewbacca to Phantom Manor and replacing the Nautilus walk-through with an Iron Man gift shop would be better? ;)
The sad thing about parodying Disney is that reality will always catch up with it. :(

TWDC is a barbaric horde of greedos intent to replace Disney parks with Disney parks (no typo) and thereby destroy what made them great. What is the current score?

We have Depp infestation in what was the world's greatest Pirates (and not DL!)
Upcharge events are creeping up from every direction faster than zombies at UNI's Halloween Horror fest.
DLP is blissfully devoid, mostly, of being unceremoniously dumped into giftshops after rides. Surely this will be rectified.
The movie park attraction celebrating Hollywood and classic movies is being replaced by the Disney property attraction (where have we heard this before)
Star Wars sprawl all over two parks (there may be no Iron Man in Verne's Nautilus yet, but there is a Darth Vader in his Hyperion!)
Speaking of Star crawl: Starbuckses popping up all over the place, replacing unique venues.
 

FigmentJedi

Well-Known Member
Star Wars sprawl all over two parks (there may be no Iron Man in Verne's Nautilus yet, but there is a Darth Vader in his Hyperion!)
Speaking of Star crawl: Starbuckses popping up all over the place, replacing unique venues.
The Hyperion was created by Donald G. Payne under the penname Ian Cameron in 1961. Thereby making it an early example of Steampunk that wasn't just "Any science fiction story produced in Victorian/Edwardian times"
 
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