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Why hasn't everybody started fussing about the upcoming ticket price increase?

raven24

Well-Known Member
People, the main reason why they've significantly increased the ticket prices is because of the much more superior product they will be providing in a few weeks, hence the reason why Disneyland is now charging more for one park compared to WDW. It doesn't have much to do with crowd control.
 

menamechris

Well-Known Member
People, the main reason why they've significantly increased the ticket prices is because of the much more superior product they will be providing in a few weeks, hence the reason why Disneyland is now charging more for one park compared to WDW. It doesn't have much to do with crowd control.

HHmm..I think there is a little more of a science and economic motivation for a price increase than "This one is more superior now...slap an insane price increase on it..."
 

erasure fan1

Well-Known Member
Ah, yes. Univeral and Sea World are such bargains :)

Well I would say comparatively speaking.... Yes. 3 days at Universal = $578 for my family. 3 days at Disney = $1112. There are no such things as "bargains" in the theme park world and a bargain is not what I am after. My point is I can do a whole lot of stuff I have never done before, and spend less than I would at Disney. We can have a fine vacation staying at old key west, pool hopping and doing things we have never scene. I have been going for over 30yrs so if we dont go to the parks, it wouldnt really bother me that much. And I know it really doesnt bother them either. Would I rather spend my time at WDW? Yes, of course I would. But if the prices continue to climb, these are the things we are planning to do.
 

JimboJones123

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
While I'm no fan of rising prices for any product or service I use, I can't get too worked up about a private business charging a price for a superior product that free consumers in a free market are willing to pay.

Disneyland management is simply charging what it thinks the free market can bear, and with the very healthy crowd levels and 1 Million Annual Passholders that Disneyland gets, it's no wonder they are raising the rates just ahead of the grand reopening of DCA.

That said, I agree that this must be the first time a Disneyland ticket price is equal to or greater than a WDW ticket. I remember trips to WDW in the 1980's and 90's and noticing that ticket prices in WDW were always a noticeably higher than whatever was the going rate for Disneyland. But now, we've got a different scenario with Disneyland's new ticket prices.

Keep in mind, there is no sales tax on tickets in California, but there is sales tax in Florida of 6.5% not included in these prices:

1 Day, 1 Park Ticket
Disneyland Resort: $87
WDW Resort: $85

1 Day Park Hopper Ticket
Disneyland Resort: $125
WDW Resort: $120

Premium Annual Pass
Disneyland Resort (Disneyland Park and DCA): $649
WDW Resort (MK, Epcot, DHS, DAK): $519
WDW Resort (including water parks & DisneyQuest): $649


What's even more interesting is that all the major theme park players in Orlando pretty much match each other on ticket prices. Universal Orlando is charging the same $85 per day, Sea World Orlando is $82, Busch Gardens is $82, Legoland is the cheapest at $75, etc.

But in Southern California, Disneyland is far and away the most expensive, even when the similar parks in SoCal like Universal Studios or Sea World or Legoland have been around for decades longer and have more rides or shows than their Orlando counterparts. Disneyland at $87 is much higher than the rest of SoCal's established and famous theme parks;

Disneyland or DCA: $87
Universal Studios Hollywood: $62
Knott's Berry Farm: $57 ($39 online advance purchase)
Sea World San Diego: $73 ($53 online advance purchase)
Legoland California: $72
Six Flags Magic Mountain: $62 ($37 online advance purchase)


That's the most interesting thing to me! In Central Florida it almost appears as if there's collusion amongst the major players to keep all ticket prices nearly the same, but in Southern California the same major players are all noticeably cheaper than Disneyland. A very odd thing to ponder!


Man, gotta get my Premier Passes before THEY go up.
 

Oddysey

Well-Known Member
I dont mind the price hikes when the quality of experience matches the hike. The increase in ticket prices and even items such as food in the park have jumped significantly in the last 5 years while very little has been added to the experience. In fact, one could make the argument that many of the things that enhance the overall experience have been taken away (interative queues aside). At least until the new FL opens in the Fall.

Not quite a complete explanation. First, the "law" is misnamed, since it isn't like a law of physics, which explains how something works, but is instead more of a drastically simplified model, meant to exhibit not how the market really works, but to show how one factor would affect the markets, if only that factor mattered.

Under that model, a decrease in demand causes prices to fall because suppliers are presumed to want to sell everything they have produced. Alternatively, suppliers respond to a decrease in demand by dropping production so that they don't need to drop prices to sell everything produced. But that only holds in a market with completely flexible supply and demand.

With WDW, the supply is not flexible, and Disney does not need to sell everything. Rather, they will set prices so that demand is equal to or less than the available supply (max capacity) in the way that maximizes total revenue. The basic model assumes the markets are looking to sell a particular quantity, but In a business with inelastic supply, letting some go unused can maximize total revenue, if the demand curve is inelastic as well. So, if raising prices by 5% only causes a 3% drop in demand, you come out ahead by raising prices. And if dropping prices by 5% only causes a 3% increase in demand, you come out a loser despite the fact that you sell more.

I was going to post something similar because the supply/demand post bothered me a bit. Although you explained it better than I would have. I bothers me when someone provides such a condisending statement while trying to sound educated. Especially when they seem to lose sight of a bigger picture. For some reason it especially bothers me when someone devolves any and every conversation about economics to simply being supply and demand. Supply and demand is just one of many economic influences. However, it is typically the easiest to understand because of its simple logic and inverse relationship. As a result, supply and demand is widely taught in any entry level economic class, and is thrown around loosely in any low level conversation concerning economics or business.
 

raven24

Well-Known Member
HHmm..I think there is a little more of a science and economic motivation for a price increase than "This one is more superior now...slap an insane price increase on it..."

Exactly what you said. A little more. But people are talking as if crowd control is the main reason why the prices skyrocketed.

They're rededicating DCA. It's an entirely new park. Not to mention everything going on at Disneyland. The prices were raised for a reason, guys. I wouldn't doubt a tiny portion has to do with crowd control, but the main reason is because of everything that's about to go down at the DLR in a few weeks. Something this huge hasn't taken place at the resort in years.
 

menamechris

Well-Known Member
Exactly what you said. A little more. But people are talking as if crowd is the main reason why the prices skyrocketed.

They're rededicating DCA. It's an entire new park. Not to mention everything going on at Disneyland. The prices were raised for a reason, guys. I wouldn't doubt a tiny portion has to do with crowd control, but the main reason is because of everything that's about to go down at the DLR in a few weeks. Something this huge hasn't taken place at the resort in years.

It is definetly a combination of things. Disney needs to try to recapture the billion dollar investment it just completed. But also, it is absolutely no secret that they have had problems with having too many passholders. This will certainly thin out the herd and make space for the additional number of tourists they will be expecting the next few years...

Just looking at the numbers, passholders took the biggest hit on price increases. In fact it may be the largest price increases Disney has implemented ever in a single increase - and it definetly seems to target those 1 Million+ passholders...
 

raven24

Well-Known Member
It is definetly a combination of things. Disney needs to try to recapture the billion dollar investment it just completed. But also, it is absolutely no secret that they have had problems with having too many passholders. This will certainly thin out the herd and make space for the additional number of tourists they will be expecting the next few years...

Just looking at the numbers, passholders took the biggest hit on price increases. In fact it may be the largest price increases Disney has implemented ever in a single increase - and it definetly seems to target those 1 Million+ passholders...

True. Some will definitely have to cut back, but that's the beauty of the payment plan! At least for those in SoCal. I'm positive the number of AP's will dwindle but not to a humongous extent. I wonder how many of those with AP's are actual residents of SoCal? That would be interesting to know.

I find it interesting how Disneyland and California Adventure, according to the company, are worth the same price as WDW's four parks, plus the water parks. Hhhmmm...
 

misterID

Well-Known Member
They'll make back their investment and then some. That's not THE reason for a price increase. Really, the last year of insane attendance and having to shut down the parks because of the crowds, they're really trying to drive down the APers attendance to rake in the tourist dollars they'd lose out on, especially all the tourists that Carsland is going to attract. I just don't know how long that will last. DLR has never been the tourist destination WDW is, but you never know if that's going to change. From what I understand, DLR will be getting more attractions here soon. Big attractions.

A big part for the increase came from Iger himself, he still feels they can increase ticket prices and people will still pay them. It's as simple as that. The thing is, DLR is much, much different than WDW. Where as in Orlando they really don't care if FL residents or APers stop going, they know the tourists will mke up for any lost "local" (or regional) revenue. It's the exact opposite over at DLR. If Apers did stop going, they would take a hit. A big hit. Right now they don't have the tourists to make that difference up. Will they in the long run? Hard to tell.
 

raven24

Well-Known Member
A big part for the increase came from Iger himself, he still feels they can increase ticket prices and people will still pay them. It's as simple as that.

This is so very true. I've already read comments from guests stating the price increase sucks, but it wasn't stopping them from going. One of those people was me.
 

Carebee21

Member
Exactly what you said. A little more. But people are talking as if crowd control is the main reason why the prices skyrocketed.

They're rededicating DCA. It's an entirely new park. Not to mention everything going on at Disneyland. The prices were raised for a reason, guys. I wouldn't doubt a tiny portion has to do with crowd control, but the main reason is because of everything that's about to go down at the DLR in a few weeks. Something this huge hasn't taken place at the resort in years.

Personally, I think there's more to it than that. Disneyland relies very heavily on their passholders. So you will never convince me that someone thought that the way to reward, please and retain these loyal passholders for dealing with the mess at DCA for the past two years was to significantly increase their passholder costs right before unveiling. Nor will you convince me that Carsland is worth this significant price hype (yes I know there's more to it, but Carsland seems to be the majority of the hype...)

They are dealing with crowding issues and were just looking for some reason or way to increase AP's while possibly justifying it. This was their opportunity. They were very close to capacity a few times in October, they ran news stories and articles warning people they could be close to or at capacity from Dec 15- Jan 2 (not just christmas and new years, the whole time period.) They're trying to outprice or push some of their AP'ers out.
 

menamechris

Well-Known Member
I find it interesting how Disneyland and California Adventure, according to the company, are worth the same price as WDW's four parks, plus the water parks. Hhhmmm...

Given the current states of HS and AK - I can understand how they could come to that conclusion. Those 2 parks especially have been neglected terribly... In a perfect world, HS would get the same treatment DCA had... But then again, I don't want a 30% increase on my annual pass, so maybe I would just settle for a couple new attractions...
 

raven24

Well-Known Member
Personally, I think there's more to it than that. Disneyland relies very heavily on their passholders. So you will never convince me that someone thought that the way to reward, please and retain these loyal passholders for dealing with the mess at DCA for the past two years was to significantly increase their passholder costs right before unveiling. Nor will you convince me that Carsland is worth this significant price hype (yes I know there's more to it, but Carsland seems to be the majority of the hype...)

They are dealing with crowding issues and were just looking for some reason or way to increase AP's while possibly justifying it. This was their opportunity. They were very close to capacity a few times in October, they ran news stories and articles warning people they could be close to or at capacity from Dec 15- Jan 2 (not just christmas and new years, the whole time period.) They're trying to outprice or push some of their AP'ers out.

I never said crowd control and the removal of AP's have absolutely nothing to do with the price increase.

You don't need to be convinced. Everything will speak for itself from June 15th and beyond.
 

raven24

Well-Known Member
Given the current states of HS and AK - I can understand how they could come to that conclusion. Those 2 parks especially have been neglected terribly... In a perfect world, HS would get the same treatment DCA had... But then again, I don't want a 30% increase on my annual pass, so maybe I would just settle for a couple new attractions...

I don't blame you.
 

Carebee21

Member
True. Some will definitely have to cut back, but that's the beauty of the payment plan! At least for those in SoCal. I'm positive the number of AP's will dwindle but not to a humongous extent. I wonder how many of those with AP's are actual residents of SoCal? That would be interesting to know.

For a family of four buying a premium AP, their month payment plan will increase by about $70ish dollars, with their monthly payment hovering just under the $200 mark. That's a lot to devote to one form of entertainment every single month, and doesn't include drinks, food, snacks, etc. I'm sure the monthly payment plan allows a significant amount of people to "afford it" but there's still a whole lot of people that probably can't afford that increase, even if they are making monthly payments. I'm sure they'll be looking at downgrading their AP's, rather than eliminating them altogether, but I do think quite a few people will have to cut back one way or the other.

I find it interesting how Disneyland and California Adventure, according to the company, are worth the same price as WDW's four parks, plus the water parks. Hhhmmm...

I'm sure the price of land really helps Disneyland's price.
 

loveofamouse

Well-Known Member
For me, the prices are a deal breaker sometimes. For example, I am going home for Memorial wknd. I would love to drop into WDW for just a day but the single day prices are too high. If they go higher at WDW, it wouldn't even be a question
 

TP2000

Well-Known Member
I wouldn't doubt a tiny portion has to do with crowd control, but the main reason is because of everything that's about to go down at the DLR in a few weeks. Something this huge hasn't taken place at the resort in years.

Years? I think the correct word would be "decades". :lol:

Not since 1967 when New Tomorrowland and Pirates of the Caribbean opened the same summer, right on the heels of It's A Small World opening in 1966 has something this huge happened in Anaheim.

You could argue that the Resort expansion of DCA, the Grand Californian and Downtown Disney opening in 2001 surpasses this, but since most of the theme park stuff included there wasn't that great (trying to be nice here), the happenings of June, 2012 and their superior quality and stunning aesthetics trump what opened in 2001.

We shall see in about four weeks. :lookaroun
 

raven24

Well-Known Member
:ROFLOL:You're right TP, I should have used "decades" instead of "years"! I wonder what it would be like for the resort if we were to get a third park? Chaos, I'm sure.
 

MichWolv

Born Modest. Wore Off.
Premium Member
I was going to post something similar because the supply/demand post bothered me a bit. Although you explained it better than I would have. I bothers me when someone provides such a condisending statement while trying to sound educated. Especially when they seem to lose sight of a bigger picture. For some reason it especially bothers me when someone devolves any and every conversation about economics to simply being supply and demand. Supply and demand is just one of many economic influences. However, it is typically the easiest to understand because of its simple logic and inverse relationship. As a result, supply and demand is widely taught in any entry level economic class, and is thrown around loosely in any low level conversation concerning economics or business.

Precisely the reason I responded. I recall my first two Econ courses, where everything seemed so simple. It was in courses 3 through 10 that the layers of reality were added that made things a whole lot more complex.
 

MadMax11

Well-Known Member
I won't whine about it...just dealing with it in light of a trip in August.

Usually I wait to buy my tickets when I check in at OKW. I've never bought them ahead of time, but I'm considering it now.

Is there anything about buying them ahead of time (not connected to my hotel room on WDW property) that affects my use of the park? I know there are EMH for people staying on property...do I just show them my hotel key?
 

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