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Why are so many adults are obsessed with WDW?

Efirefly

New Member
We came for the first time on spring break in college. The next time we came was for our honeymoon. Our next few trips were with friends from college.

Then we had a little girl. While she was small, she stayed with my parents and we still went with friends. Each trip after she was born, we thought of the things we would like to do with her when she was old enough to go.

Once she was old enough, we went at least every other year, never waiting in lines, because we knew we were coming back. When she was a teenager, we brought her and her friends. Now we bring her, her husband and our granddaughter. We never rush. We do separate things (sometimes I go to different rides/events by myself). We always meet together for dinner.

On the off years, we have often cruises on Disney Cruise Lines. I feel the service is great, there’s always something going on, transport is available, and it’s (transport, the parks and cruises) generally safe (although you always have to be aware of your surroundings these days). We don’t neglect our responsibilities for the child/children along so they aren’t brats. We don’t get overtired. As we’ve gotten older and had surgeries, we have used the various forms of rental help when we couldn’t walk as well.

It was a joy to take my mother when she didn’t want to walk a lot, but she did want to stay and see her granddaughter and great granddaughter.
The flexibility of accommodations allowed us to have a villa for that. We use a studio or room when just 2-3 of us go or a 2 bedroom when 5 or so go.

It meets all of the different passions of individuals in the group (wildlife, rides, food, special events, crafts, cultures, spa, science, agriculture, gardens, etc.). We done a lot of the special items there (Keys to the Kingdom, garden tours, dinner shows, first haircuts, princess dresses, private fireworks tours - and so many more). It’s a place to make memories with all ages.

So yes, I love it. Everywhere I go there I remember another memory - and they are all happy or funny. Now I want to go again (and right now - lol)!
 

mdcpr

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
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I agree it’s absolutely unhealthy. Any obsession or blind loyalty to any brand or company is unhealthy. I’m not a fan of Disney per say, but rather a fan of themed entertainment, just like certain people love and follow video games, music, sports, economics, ecology, astronomy, etc. And that’s not healthy, especially if your career is in the field.
Well, I don't agree is 'unhealthy.' There many other things that are truly unhealthy. Now, if spending all your hard earned dollars at Disney and not providing for your family and/or yourself is an issue, then I do see how something can become and unhealthy obsession.
 

Shouldigo12

Well-Known Member
I agree it’s absolutely unhealthy. Any obsession or blind loyalty to any brand or company is unhealthy. I’m not a fan of Disney per say, but rather a fan of themed entertainment, just like certain people love and follow video games, music, sports, economics, ecology, astronomy, etc. And that’s not healthy, especially if your career is in the field.
I agree obsession and blind loyalty isn't good, but I would hardly say adults enjoying Disney vacations sans kids are either of those things automatically. And I think it's important to remind you that you're on here posting with the rest of us, regardless of whether you're here because you like theme parks or Disney specifically.
 

tenstars

New Member
  • I’m on vacation from the moment I get on the plane to the moment I get back due to magical express and airline check in at the resort.
  • On-site transportation is awesome. I drive a lot at home to get to work and run errands. DW gives me a break from that.
  • Two people in my group have disabilities. DW is so friendly for them. It could be a struggle elsewhere.
  • Adults can ride the kids rides too :)
  • Planning is part of the fun.
  • There’s so much to do and there’s always new attractions, restaurants, etc. Each vacation can be different.
 

skimbob

Well-Known Member
I go alone because I enjoy every minute of it. I have run into so many couples that have said they didn't know how much fun it was without the kids. Walt is an idol of mine. It amazes me all that he had accomplished with a single idea. He found some of the best talent to make his dream a reality. Even though he never got to see some of his work come to fruition like POTC in DL or WDW he knew it would be in good hands.
 

deeevo

Well-Known Member
I know I might get flamed, so here's my disclaimer: No, I'm not a troll. No, I don't have any preconceived views on this. Yes, I'm just honestly curious.

This board is amazing. I've learned more about planning the first WDW family trip than I ever thought possible. I even know the acronyms! But I am curious about the fascination with all things Disney from adults. If it wasn't for my kids, I know I wouldn't be going, and I did go to WDW 4 times from the ages 5-15. So, what draws people to it? It is definitely not a value vacation, so is it pure fandom, escapism?

Would live some views on this.
I am so confused by this because my friends say the same thing. " If wasn't for my kids we wouldn't go to Disney " but here you are on a WDW message board. That makes absolutely no sense. If you really want to know why... even though I have kids and I did go before my kids were born. For kids growing up in Florida.. it's kind of been a part of our lives since birth.
 

mdcpr

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
I am so confused by this because my friends say the same thing. " If wasn't for my kids we wouldn't go to Disney " but here you are on a WDW message board. That makes absolutely no sense. If you really want to know why... even though I have kids and I did go before my kids were born. For kids growing up in Florida.. it's kind of been a part of our lives since birth.
I am indeed on the board, so I can learn all I can to have a great trip when I take my family for the first time. Last time I went to WDW it was in 2000 and I was hanging out at Pleasure Island and by the pool. I think it was my version of 'Vegas in Orlando.' Many things have changed, and that's why I'm here.
 

Isramom

New Member
"just enjoying the break from life for a while and stepping into a reality of simple magic, far away lands on earth, dream of being in the stars, its all a ton of good clean fun."

I run a large and happening household. The solo Disney trip I'm planning means a total vacation that's easy because once I arrive, everything is immediately available and at my fingertips and feet. I'm not looking for thrill rides or alcohol. Just for some time to myself to enjoy clean entertainment in a pleasant atmposhere.
 

Isramom

New Member
"the service is great, there’s always something going on, transport is available, and it’s (transport, the parks and cruises) generally safe" - Agree. This is part of why I choose Disney.

As far as obsession, well, we're all on this board together! So we're all interested in Disney. For me it's just a hobby, an innocent, light distraction from my numerous responsibilities. I enjoy planning the vacations as much as going on them.

It does seem to me that certain other people are obsessed and like their whole existence is about Disney, but maybe I come across that way to them too. ;)
 

ed fisher

New Member
I know I might get flamed, so here's my disclaimer: No, I'm not a troll. No, I don't have any preconceived views on this. Yes, I'm just honestly curious.

This board is amazing. I've learned more about planning the first WDW family trip than I ever thought possible. I even know the acronyms! But I am curious about the fascination with all things Disney from adults. If it wasn't for my kids, I know I wouldn't be going, and I did go to WDW 4 times from the ages 5-15. So, what draws people to it? It is definitely not a value vacation, so is it pure fandom, escapism?

Would live some views on this.
For me, I also enjoy watching others experience the magic of Disney.
 

Whippet Mom

Member
Simple answer, I am almost 65 & have been raised since I was a baby to love all things Disney.. My husband of 45 years also loved Disney & when dating back in Huntington Beach CA we spent many dates going to Disneyland. We continued our love for Disney through the years & purchased DVC many years ago. BTW we never had kids so we are "those people" LOL The pic is from 1955 I am in the stroller that's my sister & Dad ❤❤❤❤ That's Mom waving from the castle..
 

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Baums101

Member
I know I might get flamed, so here's my disclaimer: No, I'm not a troll. No, I don't have any preconceived views on this. Yes, I'm just honestly curious.

This board is amazing. I've learned more about planning the first WDW family trip than I ever thought possible. I even know the acronyms! But I am curious about the fascination with all things Disney from adults. If it wasn't for my kids, I know I wouldn't be going, and I did go to WDW 4 times from the ages 5-15. So, what draws people to it? It is definitely not a value vacation, so is it pure fandom, escapism?

Would live some views on this.
You could receive a million responses to this question and all of them may be different. My family has been going since I could barely walk and each time we visit we always come back talking about how much of a great time we had. The whole experience may not be as "perfect" now compared to when I was younger since I am more aware of certain things(rude people and a matured perception of how things work) but that doesn't soil the fun since those small things are far outnumbered by the fun/nostalgia I have both now and from when I was younger.
 

Toodycat

New Member
I would say three factors contribute to my Disney dedication: 1. Some romantic and relaxation associations 2. The positive impact it had on my son. 3. The way the essential parks stay the same, but there are always amazing updates and new attractions, so you’re watching this constant evolution.

I never went to WDW as a child. My younger sister was obsessed, but I was more of a museum or Broadway show kind of kid. My dad took my sister twice, but usually took me to the type of cultural events that I preferred. However, when I was 19, my boyfriend, now husband, gave me a trip to Florida for Christmas, so that i could meet his dad and visit WDW. At the time, my college roommate was being stalked by a murderous ex-boyfriend, so I was under a lot of stress. That trip was such a relaxing escape from all the drama back at school. WDW was so much fun, so imaginative and so perfectly manicured. It felt like a worry free place At the time, the GF was under construction, and we said to each other, “When we visit Disneyworld with our kids some day, we’ll stay there.”
We were married and when our son turned 7, we went to WDW and stayed at the GF. Our son has autism, so our days were very carefully scheduled with midday pool and nap time. I felt very happy at Disneyworld because everything there is designed to keep children happy, and my and my husband’s usual chores at home like cooking and cleaning were handled by CMs. Better yet, when we came home, our son showed marked progress in speech. WDW is a very sensory place, and apparently it agreed with him and caused him to come out of his shell a bit. After that, we went to WDW almost every year and/or took a Disney cruise. We discussed Walt Disney World at home and kept track of the innovations in each park. We viewed the new movies and looked forward to the tie-ins that we would see in the parks. On our second visit, my son introduced me to Minnie Mouse, saying, “Mom, Minnie’s going to love you.” For a kid with autism and mega speech delay, that was huge! We also took him on other—-mostly domestic—-vacations (California, Mexico, Alaska, the Caribbean, Washington DC, Pennsylvania, Cape Cod, Las Vegas, Vermont, Maine, London, Atlanta), but our little family always had a great time at Walt Disney World. We varied the resorts, but the GF remained our favorite. Our activities changed as we got older. For my husband’s 50th birthday, we stayed at AKL and did the Sunrise Safari with the his new camera. Other times, the focus is Epcot Food and Wine Festival as my husband and son try to “eat around the world.” Disney has become the place that feels familiar to our family, yet also has something new to offer every time. Our son has measured his own progress over the years. For quite a while, Fantasmic was too loud for him; now, he looks forward to it. For a quite a while, he was afraid of roller coasters. Now he’ll take the plunge. He’s 25 now and grown up to be a pretty capable and self-sufficient man and a college graduate. We just returned from our second family vacation to London, and while it’s great to watch him walk around an unfamiliar city with confidence, I know all of us would have been just as happy walking down Main Street USA while looking forward to Mickey’s Philharmagic or Buzz Lightyear’s Space Ranger Spin. Last summer, we visited WDW with my niece and grand-niece. It was wonderful to watch him see the parks through his little cousin’s eyes and ask her questions about her favorite attractions. So are we obsessed? Yes. Our family has too many positive Disney memories to ever feel that we’ve outgrown it.
 

lindawdw

Active Member
It's definitely an escapism for "real life" for me but it's also a place that's fairly easy to plan since it's contained in a "bubble". :) I like that you can be entertained in the parks but also enjoy top notch hotels along with dining at some incredible restaurants without having to step off property.
 

Jedi Stitch

Well-Known Member
The Disney Bubble. At WDW, you can go into a bubble that suspended reality, check your brain at the gate, be a kid again with your kids. My WDW trip, we stayed on property, used the dining plan, and just lost ourselves in Disney. It was fantastic to eat under the sea at Epcot. Have a meal at Beasts castle, If I ever could get an ADR, Cinderellas castle. Had a Polynesian meal. The possibles were endless, to what you can do and see in a week to 10 day vacation, and you still haven't seen everything. To me I think that is the appeal. I would go again once I can pay off the last one.
 

HonoraMary

New Member
Thank you. I did not think about it because that was no my case, but my youngers cousins and siblings are still WDW fans.
Two years ago I finally got to Disneyland at 65 years old. I had watched the Mickey Mouse Club every day when it was first broadcast and every time it ran in syndication. I watched the weekly prime time Disney program, Disneyland on ABC and The Wonderful World of Color on NBC, and had soaked in every program that showed how Disneyland was being built, the Grand Opening, and the Haunted Mansion and Pirates because Walt showed us what they were working on. So I had wanted to go to Disneyland since it opened, when I was 3. Because we lived in NJ and didn't have the money to spend on a trip to California we couldn't go.

I went to WDW which was closer when I was 35. The first characters I saw were Mickey & Goofy in EPCOT. I ran right over and hugged Mickey. Suddenly I wasn't 35, I was 5 again. (Then I had to apologize to Goofy for going to Mickey first. He's a little sensitive. I also apologized to him for not wanting to go over to him at the NY World's Fair when I was 12, and thought I was too old for that stuff.) Later I cried during the fireworks in the Magic Kingdom. We went back a couple of times over the years and it was always the same. The years dropped off.

So, when I had a trip to LA, that I wasn't paying for, I couldn't pass up the chance to go to Disneyland if only for a couple of hours.

That is why I have a separate bank account for my Disney Fund. I'm a 67 year old Disney child. I'm going back because I just love it there. That's my reason.
 

mdcpr

Well-Known Member
Original Poster
I would say three factors contribute to my Disney dedication: 1. Some romantic and relaxation associations 2. The positive impact it had on my son. 3. The way the essential parks stay the same, but there are always amazing updates and new attractions, so you’re watching this constant evolution.

I never went to WDW as a child. My younger sister was obsessed, but I was more of a museum or Broadway show kind of kid. My dad took my sister twice, but usually took me to the type of cultural events that I preferred. However, when I was 19, my boyfriend, now husband, gave me a trip to Florida for Christmas, so that i could meet his dad and visit WDW. At the time, my college roommate was being stalked by a murderous ex-boyfriend, so I was under a lot of stress. That trip was such a relaxing escape from all the drama back at school. WDW was so much fun, so imaginative and so perfectly manicured. It felt like a worry free place At the time, the GF was under construction, and we said to each other, “When we visit Disneyworld with our kids some day, we’ll stay there.”
We were married and when our son turned 7, we went to WDW and stayed at the GF. Our son has autism, so our days were very carefully scheduled with midday pool and nap time. I felt very happy at Disneyworld because everything there is designed to keep children happy, and my and my husband’s usual chores at home like cooking and cleaning were handled by CMs. Better yet, when we came home, our son showed marked progress in speech. WDW is a very sensory place, and apparently it agreed with him and caused him to come out of his shell a bit. After that, we went to WDW almost every year and/or took a Disney cruise. We discussed Walt Disney World at home and kept track of the innovations in each park. We viewed the new movies and looked forward to the tie-ins that we would see in the parks. On our second visit, my son introduced me to Minnie Mouse, saying, “Mom, Minnie’s going to love you.” For a kid with autism and mega speech delay, that was huge! We also took him on other—-mostly domestic—-vacations (California, Mexico, Alaska, the Caribbean, Washington DC, Pennsylvania, Cape Cod, Las Vegas, Vermont, Maine, London, Atlanta), but our little family always had a great time at Walt Disney World. We varied the resorts, but the GF remained our favorite. Our activities changed as we got older. For my husband’s 50th birthday, we stayed at AKL and did the Sunrise Safari with the his new camera. Other times, the focus is Epcot Food and Wine Festival as my husband and son try to “eat around the world.” Disney has become the place that feels familiar to our family, yet also has something new to offer every time. Our son has measured his own progress over the years. For quite a while, Fantasmic was too loud for him; now, he looks forward to it. For a quite a while, he was afraid of roller coasters. Now he’ll take the plunge. He’s 25 now and grown up to be a pretty capable and self-sufficient man and a college graduate. We just returned from our second family vacation to London, and while it’s great to watch him walk around an unfamiliar city with confidence, I know all of us would have been just as happy walking down Main Street USA while looking forward to Mickey’s Philharmagic or Buzz Lightyear’s Space Ranger Spin. Last summer, we visited WDW with my niece and grand-niece. It was wonderful to watch him see the parks through his little cousin’s eyes and ask her questions about her favorite attractions. So are we obsessed? Yes. Our family has too many positive Disney memories to ever feel that we’ve outgrown it.
Wow! You just made me cry a little. My 12 year old has autism, and I've been wanting to take him since he was 5, but I was waiting for him to mature a little bit and be less sensory seeking. I keep saying that WDW is a one and I'm out trip for us, but if my son shows a lot of progress by being there, I'll become a WDW lifer. Thank you for sharing.
 

HonoraMary

New Member
There could be some sensory overload for your son, but I have read that there are ways to manage. Go to AllEars.net. I know they have some advice for you. If you can take your son out of school for a few days, try to go when school is in session. It tends to be less crowded then, and that should help. My favorite trip was the one we took in the weeks between Thanksgiving and Christmas. The Christmas decorations are up then. Don't go during school holidays! Wall to wall people. If you live in the North where school starts in September, try going sometime during the last two weeks of August. The Southern kids go back to school early for some reason, so it cuts down on the crowds a bit.
 
I am going to try to explain it in the words of Walt Disney himself. He said, he made Disneyland so there could be a place where parents and their children could go and have fun together. Right there is a huge reason why many adults enjoy Disney so much. There isn't very many things or places where they can share laughter, enjoyment, and a smile with their kids. I know I sure have many happy memories because of Disney World with my parents.
 

HouCuseChickie

Well-Known Member
I also tend to think it's how you were presented the concept of Disney as a child. Those who are brought up to see it as strictly a place for kids tend to think it's meant to be something you outgrow (or are supposed to). The more that inaccurate mindset is pushed, the more you're likely to shun it until you have kids of your own. Some people go even farther with this... I used to work with a girl who had always been told that all Disney parks were only for young children and when it came time to take her kids, she had become so tainted by this mindset that she couldn't even allow her kids to enjoy it. She called them the baby parks and consequently, even her 5 year old bashed them and hated her time there because she wanted to be a "big girl."

I never remember my parents classifying it as something I'd outgrow where we'd stop going, I remember marketing targeted to a variety of ages and I remember us going back as kids after our 'once in a lifetime' visit because my dad really liked it much more than he planned. Heck, my dad is in his 70s and is back to debating about becoming AP holders again. I also remember old videos from Walt and the early days of DL and it never seemed like something just for kids. So, I never thought this was a place that you just stopped going after childhood and before your own children come along. I guess it helped that I lived in FL for a while during my college years and it was very normal for people of all ages to frequent the parks (minus the group of Floridians who hate all things Disney). It was also the first vacation DH and I took together when we started dating.
 
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